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Princess Diana Death 20 Years On: Character of UK

#1
I found this article today which largely reflects how I feel about it now:

The Transfiguration of Diana

Whilst I am no royalist, I was to some extent caught up in the general grief and sadness at the time. However, looking back on those days, I think the national grief-fest was either the cause or effect of some deep-seated change in our national psyche. I'm currently reading GMF's 'Quartered Safe Out Here', and he has some trenchant comments on the emotional incontinence of media and society in modern times. Put it this way, 'feelings' are not something they had much time to dwell on in Burma in mid-1945!

Anyway, my thought is that this is very much NOT the nation some on here seem to think it is. The stiff upper lip is long gone, any sense of duty has long been replaced by a sense of entitlement in the general populace, the upper echelons of society care little for public service or indeed for this country at all , many being either foreign or at least internationalist in outlook.

Where does this end? No civilisation long outlasts the willingness of its citizens to defend it.

Anyway there's a lot more to be said on this subject, but that's rant over for now.
 
#2
The UK is no longer what it was or even what it thought and hoped it was.

I always wonder what the Romans did when Rome fell and is it akin to what is happening to the UK?

People all over the world took their cue as to civilised behavior from the Brits, not any more.
 
#4
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FFS. People in the UK are living longer than they ever have done. The 'stiff upper lip' has not long gone - it was a nonsense in the first place. The only people who promoted the concept were the middle classes who it didn't affect anyway. Like Peter Hitchens you're pining for an era that never actually existed.
 
#6
This thread is about what the grief-fest at the time of Diana's death says about the UK as it is now, rather than about Diana's death per se. But happy to see it merged or deleted as the mods see fit.
 
#7
That whole thing was a national embarrassment; fortunately one which yours truly never took part in. I remember saying at work on the Tuesday afterwards:

ulape - "well, it wasn't true then"
workies - "what wasn't true?"
ulape - "It's the third day, and she hasn't risen yet"

Not widely appreciated at the time.

But, subsequently, the whole Diana wailfest is now recognised as something that, really, we shouldn't have done.

So the only people still banging on about her failure to listen to fellow "icon" Jimmy Savile are metrownakers in the newspapers and TV. To our credit, I think.
 
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#8
This thread is about what the grief-fest at the time of Diana's death says about the UK as it is now, rather than about Diana's death per se. But happy to see it merged or deleted as the mods see fit.
The grief-fest was a simple case of mass hysteria whipped up by the Press, wasn't the first time it has happened and won't be the last. That really has no relevance in things once you realise WHY we have the annual BS fest, and it's all thanks to the media, much as most hysterics since have also been whipped up by the same.

And the "stiff upper lip" was always a myth, a perception, and bears as much resemblance to reality as the infamous "Blitz Spirit" where "Londoners all mucked in together to help each other, yoomanitee at it's best" which was, as we know, utter hoop.
 
#9
It was pretty cringeworthy at the time. In my experience us Brits just extract the urine whenever the going gets tough and all I really remember are the jokes being cracked while us lads sat in the Naafi to the background sobs of the Waaf's greeting. The only way it ever affected me was the way I would stand bemused at people crying over someone they only really knew from a TV screen. Still don't get it.

I still maintain Diana was bumped off by Interflora though. They made a mint out of the ensuing grief fest.
 
#10
It was pretty cringeworthy at the time. In my experience us Brits just extract the urine whenever the going gets tough and all I really remember are the jokes being cracked while us lads sat in the Naafi to the background sobs of the Waaf's greeting. The only way it ever affected me was the way I would stand bemused at people crying over someone they only really knew from a TV screen. Still don't get it.

I still maintain Diana was bumped off by Interflora though. They made a mint out of the ensuing grief fest.
Don't forget Clintons and Hallmark, selling expensive cards and cuddly toys to wuckfits every year since
 
#12
So they weren't acting alone ?? .. The plot thickens.
@Mods, I think this may be a good time to move this thread because I'm kinda wondering how many times we have to say "Clintons involved in death of Diana" before it appears high up the list on google and we set the loonspudosphere alight ...
 
#17
Something which came out a year or so afterwards was that the bbc's switchboard was inundated with calls to get the worthless guff binned. It was whipped up hysteria.
I bought the relevant copy of Punch and listened to my News Quiz tapes.
 
#19
People have changed. I thought of that when I came across a report on the great Napier Earthquake of February 1931. I enclose an extract from the Record Of Proceedings of HM Sloop Veronica, with the Captain accounting for her time alongside in Napier, when a devastating earthquake struck and with the ensuring fire, destroyed the city and nearby towns, with a huge loss of life:

Many women and children now commenced to come onboard and were accommodated as best we could, they continued to come onboard during the remainder of the day and by night time a large number had arrived, all more or less destitute. We fed them as well as we could I would pay a high tribute to the courage of the women who never made a murmur and were pathetically grateful for the little we could do for them...

...The night which followed was rather trying as shocks kept recurring and the wharf to which the ship was secured showed signs of collapsing on top of us, however the women and children were extraordinarily good and to our intense relief day broke without anything further having happened.
.
I give you the Grenfell Tower Grief-fest.
 

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