Prince Philip death announced

On a lighter side, junior daughter said she was watching with her two young boys and was explaining to her youngest (5 years old) that the Queen's husband had died, it was his funeral when he is laid to rest and was in the box - called a coffin - that was being carried by the soldiers. Youngest, in all innocence, asked "Do they let him out afterwards?" Kids!! Don't you just love them?
My five year old watched the flag draped coffin brought out to be put on the Landy and said 'now they are bringing a big table out'......
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Having carried my friend to the graveside, the practices before hand ensured that my foot drill was instep. You ignore the weight as you’re carrying a friend.

On that tour I didn't have to carry any casualties or bodies of those who I knew. The majority of the deceased I moved were insurgents/civilians.
Boxed are much easier to deal with.
 
That,ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, is how to do things and why this nation has the word "great" in its title. A fitting tribute to a fine man that was diminished not one iota by current restrictions. Instead we were given ringside seats by our nation broadcaster, who are to be commended.

I cannot wait for the Republican fcuktards to start on fizzogbook.
PETA or Extinction Rebellion have a tremendous sense of timing, don't they.

Have the mind bleach handy.

I watched the comment-free stream of the funeral on the Globe and Mail's account on youtube today. It was a top-notch ceremony all around, but the piper (looking at the tartan on his uniform, I'm assuming he's 4 SCOTS) sounded spectacular, as I found the acoustics perfect for his instrument, and he played the lament with a lot of expression.
 
In all fairness to the Archbishop of Canterbury he was playing second fiddle to the Dean of Westminster, who was running the show and whose Chapel the funeral was taking place in.
Apparently 'Hugh - ( who I thought was very good until he started blue sky thinking over the future of the Royal Family!)' - said that Windsor and the other Royal Chapels do not come under the Church of England.
Windsor Chapel is a "Royal Peculiar", a church under the direct jurisdiction of the monarch and not under the jurisdiction of the ABoC. The ABoC was invited, out of correctness, to give a blessing.
 

philc

LE
Pleased I watched, did not plan to. Glad the Armed Forces including crabfats put on a good show.

Oddly the Queen on her own, paying her respects in her own way with no outsiders was a masterstroke, it put her above the common crowd.

A great loss.
 
Good Point - like the Royal Intelligence Corps.
I can't remember the term used, but units on parade were described as those with a particular connection to PtG. Regimental Colonel etc..
 

Yokel

LE
Well since I joined the navy I've played the bosun's call
From Singers down to Mombas, I must have played them all
But I've not heard anything like it in any Junior Rate's dining hall
That three-badge, AB Gunner
Sure plays a mean bosun's call

Hmm! To the Tune of Pinball Wizard!
 

Yokel

LE
On a serious note, even today has been educational in terms of what the Duke of Edinburgh did. Setting up a fund to support bereaved families and injured troops from the Grenadier Guards, setting up a place within Windsor Castle when people can meet to discuss serious issues in privacy, and helping protect playgrounds and sports fields by putting them in trust, not to mention the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme....
 

lextalionis

Old-Salt
On a serious note, even today has been educational in terms of what the Duke of Edinburgh did. Setting up a fund to support bereaved families and injured troops from the Grenadier Guards, setting up a place within Windsor Castle when people can meet to discuss serious issues in privacy, and helping protect playgrounds and sports fields by putting them in trust, not to mention the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme....
The most striking thing about the Royal Family is just how much they are weft into the fabric of this country. You can certainly come across them in your daily life without any additional effort - they are usually out doing something, or visiting someone. They are imperfect, sometimes deeply so, but you cannot deny that, usually, they are concerned for the well-being of this country and the Commonwealth.
 

ipso_facto

War Hero
I have friends in the Anglican clergy and the Church of England seems to be becoming curiously corporate. The loveable, ramshackle institution of "The Vicar of Dibley" is giving way, slowly but surely, to various waves of evangelicalism (of varying strength) and careerist clergy. The CofE, bizarrely, has a "Talent Pool", the members of which undertake a short MBA-style course before being preferred for more managerial roles (such as in a cathedral). Of course, there are ever more chiefs and ever fewer indians to do the day-to-day work...

The CoE is a three-ringed circus.
 

Yokel

LE
The most striking thing about the Royal Family is just how much they are weft into the fabric of this country. You can certainly come across them in your daily life without any additional effort - they are usually out doing something, or visiting someone. They are imperfect, sometimes deeply so, but you cannot deny that, usually, they are concerned for the well-being of this country and the Commonwealth.

I am tempted to say "they are us", but that is a poor use of grammar. I am sure you know what I mean.

Many times Her Majesty has spoken to the nation, or on behalf of the nation, in the way a kindly grandmother or other female relative can offer words of warmth and wisdom and times of uncertainty or loss.

 

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