Presentable Watches

But you appear to have it strapped to the leg of a very old tortoise.
Is that wise ?
Not a very old tortoise just a somewhat old guy. You have to expect that someone with a 52 year old watch would be at least somewhat old. ;P

@Banker - I am not a watch collector and know nothing about different crystals. I do know that after 52 years it has no scratches. Also know that like the old Timex ads "it takes a licking and keeps on ticking" When I go it will be my son's and it should last him a while.
 
When I was young and happily divorced (hence some spare pennies) I put my Rolex in for a service. The first quote was just plain stupid - replace this, replace that. I went for just clean and make it work again and that was expensive enough.

Subsequently, it went into a local watchmaker's shop and he did sterling work for virtually nothing. He did sign it on the inside of the rear case each time, as they do.

I have a guy here in Spain who seems quite good, but also a guy on Gib who is brilliant and will also seek out 'interesting' watches for you.

As an aside, if you have a Rolex and want it repaired or bits for it done MUCH cheaper than the UK, then a holiday to GIb and a visit to 'The Red House' (Rolex agent). How's about £105 for a Submariner (blue face) face and hands replacement?
 
Nice to see an old-school plexiglass dome rather than glass face. Mine's very similar, and has also done it's service.....diving, surfing etc etc.

I think you might be surprised at how much it's worth, particularly with the original receipt. More so if you have the box and tags. It'll be somewhere between $12k and $15k retail, if not more. Weirdly, early Subs are disporportionately expensive given their relative standing in the range.....but that's fashion.

Here's my "keeper" from the year before yours was made.

I have a Submariner Triple 0 (zero), the wife bought it for me xmas '87 from the JHQ PX, the little shed like building down the end of Queens Drive. It was on display in the shiny things cabinet and she asked the manager, he told her it had been ordered, with a deposit but, a month later the bloke had not come back to pick it up.....so if she wanted it, it was her's and he would refund the bloke his deposit.

I believe I still have the original receipt for just over $1100.00, I do have absolutely everything else that came with it: Box, anchor, booklets, red seal, everything.

Over the years it has been shot at, EOD duties, patrolled, jumped out of planes, scuba dived, yomped, surfed, arrested people, fixed and test driven race cars, been covered in wall plaster more times than I care to remember and had a generally pretty good life.

A few years ago I found out it was a triple zero and what that meant, a happy accident that has seen me receive some offers. Though my 16 year old has already placed dib's on it and to be honest I am happy in the knowledge that it will go to him and he might remember his pain in the arrse old man occasionally.
 
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It's probably about time to tell a little story about watches both Swiss and Japanese.

There used to be a chronometer competition run in Switzerland at Neuchatel and Geneva. These were competitions entered by all the major Swiss watchmakers like Girard-Perreguax, Omega and Longines.

Seiko entered their first watch into the contest in 1964. It was sh1t. In 1967 they took 2nd and 3rd place to Omega.

In 1968 the Neuchatel Observatory cancelled chronometer tests for good...
 
It's probably about time to tell a little story about watches both Swiss and Japanese.

There used to be a chronometer competition run in Switzerland at Neuchatel and Geneva. These were competitions entered by all the major Swiss watchmakers like Girard-Perreguax, Omega and Longines.

Seiko entered their first watch into the contest in 1964. It was sh1t. In 1967 they took 2nd and 3rd place to Omega.

In 1968 the Neuchatel Observatory cancelled chronometer tests for good...
A bit like California wine in that little wine tasting competition in Paris back in 1976, The Judgement of Paris as it was called. That all caused a bit of an upset for the French.

Bottles of each of the winning wines are held at the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian.

That Revolutionary May Day in 1976 When California Wines Bested France's Finest | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian
 
You should see what 60's Submariners have done......the price increase is insane. I found two at deceased estate auctions a couple of decades ago, bought them both for not much and sold them a few years ago. One had red writing on the dial, issued by an oil company to its divers, and it went for insane money.
One of the fabled Red Sea Sub's, should have kept that one..........I know, I know, hindsight and all that. The Red Sea's are a good second place to the SBS issued Sub's,..........the one's that they all luckily took out kit insurance for, fortunate really as most, if not all, of them were 'lost' by those issued with them.
 
View attachment 399079

My watch - Bought in December of 1966. It cost US$235. (I still have the receipt) I have been told that it is worth a few thousand now. I don't care about investment, it keeps time well, is easy to read at night and has proven durable through sailing, swimming and scuba diving. Back when I still played old guy, pickup, no hit (allegedly) ice hockey I wore it but of course it was under the cuff of the hockey glove. (I gave up hockey at 50).
It has held up well. The original bracelet was not like current one and was made up of many much smaller links. That bracelet bit the dust around 1975 and I replaced it with the sturdier standard bracelet. I once had the bezel get knocked off and lost back in the early 80's and had the watch go through the clean, lube adjust service then. IIRC the cost back then was around $850. I think the same servicing now would be over $1000. I am putting that off as I hate the thought of paying 4 times the purchase price to service it.

They really do hold up. The father of a friend had one. He was a MG in command of a division in Vietnam in 1970. When his helo crashed in Cambodia he was identified by his teeth and the watch. Watch was working but the bracelet was broken. His son was then newly commissioned in the Army and his mother had the bracelet replaced. He wore it throughout his 41 year career in the US Army. When his son , a reservist, deployed to a nasty sandy place my friend gave him the watch. It still works.

What I am saying is that a Rolex is durable and holds its value. Plus you will never need to worry about replacing batteries or finding out that the battery you need is no longer available. You can't go wrong.
Think it depends on the model of the Rolex watch. My fathers went for an unexpected swim at Westkapelle in 1944. By the end of hostilities it was totally junked and apparently unrepairable.
 
I have a Submariner Triple 0 (zero), the wife bought it for me xmas '87 from the JHQ PX, the little shed like building down the end of Queens Drive. It was on display in the shiny things cabinet and she asked the manager, he told her it had been ordered, with a deposit but, a month later the bloke had not come back to pick it up.....so if she wanted it, it was her's and he would refund the bloke his deposit.

I believe I still have the original receipt for just over $1100.00, I do have absolutely everything else that came with it: Box, anchor, booklets, red seal, everything.

Over the years it has been shot at, EOD duties, patrolled, jumped out of planes, scuba dived, yomped, surfed, arrested people, fixed and test driven race cars, been covered in wall plaster more times than I care to remember and had a generally pretty good life.

A few years ago I found out it was a triple zero and what that meant, a happy accident that has seen me receive some offers. Though my 16 year old has already placed dib's on it and to be honest I am happy in the knowledge that it will go to him and he might remember his pain in the arrse old man occasionally.
As I said above, I don't collect the things, just wear it 24/7/365. What is a triple zero and what does that mean??
 
It's probably about time to tell a little story about watches both Swiss and Japanese.

There used to be a chronometer competition run in Switzerland at Neuchatel and Geneva. These were competitions entered by all the major Swiss watchmakers like Girard-Perreguax, Omega and Longines.

Seiko entered their first watch into the contest in 1964. It was sh1t. In 1967 they took 2nd and 3rd place to Omega.

In 1968 the Neuchatel Observatory cancelled chronometer tests for good...
Looks like Seiko are after another bite of the cherry with there Grand Seiko range. Nice watches but they don't get my blood pumping like a Rolex Sub from the 90's (or earlier), or an Omega, or even a Swatch for that matter.
 
Looks like Seiko are after another bite of the cherry with there Grand Seiko range. Nice watches but they don't get my blood pumping like a Rolex Sub from the 90's (or earlier), or an Omega, or even a Swatch for that matter.

Grand Seiko have been available in Japan for years. It's only recently that they've started selling them officially in the west.

Seiko's top of the range watches are called Credor. The Credor Sonnerie costs around 400,000 US dollars.

credor.jpg



Edited to add a movie

 
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Over the years it has been shot at, EOD duties, patrolled, jumped out of planes, scuba dived, yomped, surfed, arrested people, fixed and test driven race cars, been covered in wall plaster more times than I care to remember and had a generally pretty good life.
I'm starting to realise the error of my ways. That's the kind of reliability I was looking for. Mine has pulled a few g's, wrangled horses, been through sandy places and a few other adventures but hasn't demonstrated the longevity of some of the examples posted here.
 
A bit like California wine in that little wine tasting competition in Paris back in 1976, The Judgement of Paris as it was called. That all caused a bit of an upset for the French.

Bottles of each of the winning wines are held at the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian.

That Revolutionary May Day in 1976 When California Wines Bested France's Finest | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian

I went to Majestic to buy some booze last week. Looking at the 'fine wine' rack the most expensive bottle in there was a Californian Merlot at 70 quid.
 
Grand Seiko have been available in Japan for years. It's only recently that they've started selling them officially in the west.

Seiko's top of the range watches are called Credor. The Credor Sonnerie costs around 400,000 US dollars.

View attachment 399358


Edited to add a movie

I am not denying they are good watches, just that GS does not do it for me.
One of my favourite watches is an ordinary Seiko from '83. It is a Seiko H556-5029, Digi analogue with a two tone alarm.
It gives me great joy wearing it but is worth a fraction of the price of GS.
Watches are like women.
 
As I said above, I don't collect the things, just wear it 24/7/365. What is a triple zero and what does that mean??
Rolex Sub's went through a design change in the mid to late 80's - they basically went through a design, materials and movement change. Some of the watches produced for a very short period of some months had a mish mash of the old and the new making them the rarest standard retail production model of Submariner ever*. The model designation given to the mish mash watches was 168000, hence the triple zero.

Note: The are rarer model's of Submariner out there but, they were custom made for clients and never for open retail sale for example: @bankers Red Sea Sub (it actually has a much longer mouthful of a name than that) which were made exclusively for Comex, a diving company; and, then there is the holy grail of Sub's which is the UK issue Milsub ==> Military Issue Rolex Submariner Watches | Bob's Watches
 
I went to Majestic to buy some booze last week. Looking at the 'fine wine' rack the most expensive bottle in there was a Californian Merlot at 70 quid.
People say that the best stuff is always kept at home and the crap is exported. I remember some of the California wine's that I used to accidentally drink in Europe and to me they were little better than a mouthful of petrol. As Euro wine is rare in the US and the one's available here ain't exactly the best anyway I have been trying California wines. TBH for around $12 - $15 a bottle you get some pretty good tasting California wine's, a $15 - $20 bottle is excellent and is probably approaching the 70 quid bottle you get in the UK - factoring in transport, duties and mark up.

Just as a point of interest: China is California wine's biggest market as Americans prefer to drink beer. Trump's trade war with China is slowly killing the California wine industry as their sale's are on a downward trend.
 
New work watch, same as I had 20 years ago. On a watch stand that my daughter bought me. Simple, easy to read and bloody indestructible
image.jpg
 

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