Pres.Putin proposes mr.Medvedev as as presidential candidate

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7136347.stm

Russian President Vladimir Putin has backed First Deputy PM Dmitry Medvedev as presidential candidate to replace him next year, Russian media report.
"I fully support this candidacy," Mr Putin was quoted as saying.


The servant is waiting for orders from the master.
 
#2
Too True,

Do you like your master's style of democracy too, Sergey?
 
#3
so now we know who Putin sees as the weakest and most pliable candidate who is least likely to turn on him after he steps down.
Look on the bright side though - at least it isn't Sergei "Darth Vader" Ivanov.
 
#4
in_the_cheapseats said:
Too True,

Do you like your master's style of democracy too, Sergey?
Mate, I travel across Russia. Just yesturday I returned for the city of Rybinsk (350 km to North from Moscow). Tomorrow I will fly to Bashkortostan. Two weeks ago I have been to Siberia.

People across Russia mainly think about their every day problems and not super politically active. Meanwhile life goes better and better. Many Russian think that it happened thanks to Putin. I don't think that Putin is an ideal political leader, not at all. He is not from my point of view one of the best. But the majority of the Russians disagrees with me. And I must accept it (it is one of corner-stones of democracy) that the majority wish to see Putin and his crew as power-keepers.

It is a big success of mr.Putin, his polit-technologists, his aides that they managed to create attractive image of a national leader, that economy is booming, that living standards are improving.

Returning to your question I should say that really there is practically no difference between Western and Russian styles of democracy.
 
#5
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
Too True,

Do you like your master's style of democracy too, Sergey?
Mate, I travel across Russia. Just yesturday I returned for the city of Rybinsk (350 km to North from Moscow). Tomorrow I will fly to Bashkortostan. Two weeks ago I have been to Siberia.

People across Russia mainly think about their every day problems and not super politically active. Meanwhile life goes better and better. Many Russian think that it happened thanks to Putin. I don't think that Putin is an ideal political leader, not at all. He is not from my point of view one of the best. But the majority of the Russians disagrees with me. And I must accept it (it is one of corner-stones of democracy) that the majority wish to see Putin and his crew as power-keepers.

It is a big success of mr.Putin, his polit-technologists, his aides that they managed to create attractive image of a national leader, that economy is booming, that living standards are improving.

Returning to your question I should say that really there is practically no difference between Western and Russian styles of democracy.
That may be your perception, Sergey. It is far from the truth.
 
#6
in_the_cheapseats said:
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
Too True,

Do you like your master's style of democracy too, Sergey?
Mate, I travel across Russia. Just yesturday I returned for the city of Rybinsk (350 km to North from Moscow). Tomorrow I will fly to Bashkortostan. Two weeks ago I have been to Siberia.

People across Russia mainly think about their every day problems and not super politically active. Meanwhile life goes better and better. Many Russian think that it happened thanks to Putin. I don't think that Putin is an ideal political leader, not at all. He is not from my point of view one of the best. But the majority of the Russians disagrees with me. And I must accept it (it is one of corner-stones of democracy) that the majority wish to see Putin and his crew as power-keepers.

It is a big success of mr.Putin, his polit-technologists, his aides that they managed to create attractive image of a national leader, that economy is booming, that living standards are improving.

Returning to your question I should say that really there is practically no difference between Western and Russian styles of democracy.
That may be your perception, Sergey. It is far from the truth.
So Western democracy is even worse than Russian one?
 
#7
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
Too True,

Do you like your master's style of democracy too, Sergey?
Mate, I travel across Russia. Just yesturday I returned for the city of Rybinsk (350 km to North from Moscow). Tomorrow I will fly to Bashkortostan. Two weeks ago I have been to Siberia.

People across Russia mainly think about their every day problems and not super politically active. Meanwhile life goes better and better. Many Russian think that it happened thanks to Putin. I don't think that Putin is an ideal political leader, not at all. He is not from my point of view one of the best. But the majority of the Russians disagrees with me. And I must accept it (it is one of corner-stones of democracy) that the majority wish to see Putin and his crew as power-keepers.

It is a big success of mr.Putin, his polit-technologists, his aides that they managed to create attractive image of a national leader, that economy is booming, that living standards are improving.

Returning to your question I should say that really there is practically no difference between Western and Russian styles of democracy.
That may be your perception, Sergey. It is far from the truth.
So Western democracy is even worse than Russian one?
We at least do not fall willingly into the arms of one who is, de facto, a dictator.
 
#8
Indeed no. We just sleepwalk into their arms.
 
#9
in_the_cheapseats said:
We at least do not fall willingly into the arms of one who is, de facto, a dictator.
Mate, what is the difference between mr.Putin and mr.Blair? If Putin is 'de facto a dictator' then why mssrs Blair and Brown are not dictators?
 
#10
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
We at least do not fall willingly into the arms of one who is, de facto, a dictator.
Mate, what is the difference between mr.Putin and mr.Blair? If Putin is 'de facto a dictator' then why mssrs Blair and Brown are not dictators?
Our journalists can- and do- criticise them, without being double-tapped in the forehead outside their front doors.
 
#11
Rumpelstiltskin said:
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
We at least do not fall willingly into the arms of one who is, de facto, a dictator.
Mate, what is the difference between mr.Putin and mr.Blair? If Putin is 'de facto a dictator' then why mssrs Blair and Brown are not dictators?
Our journalists can- and do- criticise them, without being double-tapped in the forehead outside their front doors.
Russian journalists (and anybody) have absolutely the same right. If you have a lot of money you are free to buy (or establish) a newspaper or TV channel and criticise anybody including mr.Putin.

Late ms.Politkovskaya was not the only journalist in Novaya gazeta newspaper. Other journalists in this edition are Putin's critics as well

http://en.novayagazeta.ru/

http://www.novayagazeta.ru/

It is a fresh cartoon from the newspaper



In Russian 'Medved' means 'a bear'. So the cartoon refers to Putin's candidate Medvedev as a puppet of 'the big bear'.
 
#12
KGB_resident said:
Rumpelstiltskin said:
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
We at least do not fall willingly into the arms of one who is, de facto, a dictator.
Mate, what is the difference between mr.Putin and mr.Blair? If Putin is 'de facto a dictator' then why mssrs Blair and Brown are not dictators?
Our journalists can- and do- criticise them, without being double-tapped in the forehead outside their front doors.
Russian journalists (and anybody) have absolutely the same right. If you have a lot of money you are free to buy (or establish) a newspaper or TV channel and criticise anybody including mr.Putin.

Late ms.Politkovskaya was not the only journalist in Novaya gazeta newspaper. Other journalists in this edition are Putin's critics as well
European election monitors today accused the Kremlin of manipulating the Russian parliamentary elections in which Vladimir Putin's party secured a landslide victory.
Luc van den Brande, who headed the delegation from the Council of Europe's parliamentary assembly, said officials had brought the "overwhelming influence of the president's office and the president" to bear on the campaign, and that "administrative resources" had been used to influence the outcome.

Goran Lennmarker, of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, said it was "not a fair election".
A spokesman for the German government, Thomas Steg, said there was "no doubt" the elections were "neither free, fair nor democratic" by western European standards

Your opinion or mine don't matter - international perception is that you don't know what you are talking about, Sergey. :roll:
 
#13
KGB_resident said:
It is a fresh cartoon from the newspaper

That is actually a rather good cartoon.
 
#14
Interesting, not so much a "changing of the guard" as a "rotation of the chair". Russia's new Tzars.

http://www.gazprom.com/

Russia's increasing prosperity is closely attributed to that blue squiggle on the right.

It's probably for the best, I don't know if a Chess Champion would have really cut the mustard, though i'm sure he'd have made a shrewd tactican. Perhaps an appointment in the Navy?
 
#15
in_the_cheapseats said:
KGB_resident said:
Rumpelstiltskin said:
KGB_resident said:
in_the_cheapseats said:
We at least do not fall willingly into the arms of one who is, de facto, a dictator.
Mate, what is the difference between mr.Putin and mr.Blair? If Putin is 'de facto a dictator' then why mssrs Blair and Brown are not dictators?
Our journalists can- and do- criticise them, without being double-tapped in the forehead outside their front doors.
Russian journalists (and anybody) have absolutely the same right. If you have a lot of money you are free to buy (or establish) a newspaper or TV channel and criticise anybody including mr.Putin.

Late ms.Politkovskaya was not the only journalist in Novaya gazeta newspaper. Other journalists in this edition are Putin's critics as well
European election monitors today accused the Kremlin of manipulating the Russian parliamentary elections in which Vladimir Putin's party secured a landslide victory.
Luc van den Brande, who headed the delegation from the Council of Europe's parliamentary assembly, said officials had brought the "overwhelming influence of the president's office and the president" to bear on the campaign, and that "administrative resources" had been used to influence the outcome.

Goran Lennmarker, of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, said it was "not a fair election".
A spokesman for the German government, Thomas Steg, said there was "no doubt" the elections were "neither free, fair nor democratic" by western European standards

Your opinion or mine don't matter - international perception is that you don't know what you are talking about, Sergey. :roll:
The officials are apparently biased. And they failed to mention what actually was made wrong (except the Russians voted wrongly from their point of view).
 
#16
Your link answers you:

It was important to prove that it’s not only province who loves the President and the Party for the necessary 70% - the depressed province who lives below subsistence level and has access to only two TV channels. It was important to prove that Moscow and St Petersburg – with their Marches of the Discordant - support the President too. It was the principal task: to oppress the protest at its cradle and to convince all those who have doubts that the capitals vote for Putin. After that it would be possible to make strategic progress towards presidential election in March.
This was the main objective of the election that was announced impudently to be the referendum of confidence to the President. But preliminary situation was that according to special and unpublished polls, the rating by United Russia hardly reached 40% and in Moscow it was even lower. That was going to be a failure
http://en.novayagazeta.ru/

lack of easy access to free and fair information erodes an election's credability. The only way to gain such information in Russia is to either live in one of the two major population centres, or trawl the web. Many have neither option.
 

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