Preparation for Morning Jogs

#1
Hi everybody,

Due to a currently busy time at work, whilst training for my selection course in September, I am going to start doing runs in the morning, hopefully 4-6 miles at 7a.m. 5 days a week. Getting to the point, I was wondering if any one had any suggestions about when/ what to eat with this programme.

The reason I ask is last time I did this I used to get a stitch quite quickly if I ate breakfast before the run and often felt a lack of energy if I didn't eat and went for the run as soon as I got up.

Any help will be much appreciated.
 
#3
I hate running in the morning before brekkers, and often have the same running on empty feeling that you mention. I'm usually okay for up to about 5k though. Have you tried running shorter distances?

Failing that, just eat a light breakfast, for example a banana and a piece of toast, and see how it goes. If that doesn't work you could try those energy gel things. I've used them on longer runs (1/2 marathons) and found them very good.

T_T
 
#4
paulored said:
The reason I ask is last time I did this I used to get a stitch quite quickly if I ate breakfast before the run and often felt a lack of energy if I didn't eat and went for the run as soon as I got up.

Any help will be much appreciated.
Eat something easy to digest and easy on your stomach such as refined porridge oats. Usually I stick my nose up at disgust refined/processed oats (like ready-brek type stuff), but it is a great source of quick energy before things like running and cycling, and a glass of orange juice.

You should also learn to prevent stitches as well. The first thing you need to do is change your breathing. Most people will breathe in when their left foot strikes, and breathe out when their right foot strikes. If you do this. Stop it. The right side of your body has more to bash of your Diaphragm than your left side. So breathing our on your right strike will cause a stitch much more. Breath in on your right strike, and out on your left. You will find it hard to get used to at first but you will find your stitches almost vanishing. You may still get the occasional slight, but no where near as much. :)
 
#5
just get on with it!

a coffee will be fine, i run into the office on that most days (45min) i know its not the best thing in the world but just get on with it
 
#6
Eeeeh when I were a lad, it was a fag, finish off the dreggs of the beer bottle, bit of cold gyros if lucky, and off to trot, trying to be at the front of the squad to avoid the driffting smells that just made one gag!

This morning after a cup of tea the hound and I went for a few miles, nice steady jog, felt good, and nashed a couple of French Pate butties when I got into the office, very civilised.

How one changes with age!
 
#9
I would agree with the coffee, just don't drink too much or go too far, as the last mile or two might become a sprint to the bogs (my old daily ritual).
 
#11
JonnoJonno said:
Ian1983 said:
I would agree with the coffee, just don't drink too much or go too far, as the last mile or two might become a sprint to the bogs (my old daily ritual).
Hence waking up earlier to go before you go :wink:
Unforunately you may not need to go until you have ha a large dose of caffeine on a empty stomach and then start mixing it all around
 
#12
You're body will get used to it either way and personally I favour the latter for a morning run. Although the former might involve some vomiting, as my dear sister once said, "No one ever died from a stitch".
 
#13
Before my morning run I usually grab a handful of dried fruit, a big spoonful of peanut butter and a glass of juice, then I'm out the door.
By the time I get back, I'm invariably ready for a mahoosive dump, which is nice.
Then I fire up the kettle and microwave for coffee and porridge (with more dried fruit) which I leave to cool while I jump in the shower.
 
#14
I have a banana when I get up, wait 15-20 mins, then set off.

If you want to vary your routine have a cup of coffee. This means you will have to stop for a dump about half way round which turns the whole experience into a white knuckle ride.
Where will you get the turtles' head?
Will you have the fortune to have an accepting bush to jump into?
or will you have to suffer the indignity of a telephone box.

I once managed the same spot, by a lake, 5 days on the trot. It added an extra dimension to the run as I could see my last few bowel actions 'biodegrading' as the days went by.
Not just a run, but a chemistry experiment at the same time.

Best of luck with your faeces examinations.
 
#16
dont have anything in my opinion, or a banana at most with some fluids.

have a big meal with lots of carbs of an evening, the glycogen in your muscles will be more then enough to see you through, unless you knock out over about 13 miles. have a good amount of carbs and fat in your diet, your body will have the energy to see you through.

dont do the old 'up, into running kit, out the door' mistake. give your body time to wake up, walk round the house a bit, get stuff ready for when you get back etc.

anybody who has ever been bugged out on an exercise should be aware that going from asleep to mach 10 in a short space of time is not a pleasant experience.

after a while, you will get used to either way. i see it like this though:

im going to be hungry when i get back, even if i have a bowl of cereal before. so i might as well save 10 minutes by only eating after, rather then a bit before and a bit after. plus it means i dont have a bowl of shreddies bouncing around the whole way.
 
#17
Thanks to everyone that replied.

I have fond that a banana in the morning is a great help, whether the energy it gives can be used in the run half an hour after I eat it and leave for the run I don’t know, but psychologically it gives a great boost a 6:30 a.m.

With the weather how it is at the moment in the South of England it is great to smash out 5 miles before breakfast. The best bit of advice I think was letting you body wake up, I used to roll out of bed and shoot out the door but getting up 20-30 minutes earlier to just walk around the house getting things ready before going makes a great deal of difference. The only difficulty about the runs is getting out of the bed but after that, your up it is a great way to start the day.

Thanks
 
#18
2-300Kcal (I prefer dried fruit / fruit myself) 30-60min before your run & ensure you are properly hydrated (pint of tea for me). Managing a dump pre-run is a good omen for me too, I'm one of those poor sods that always needs the toilet mid-run :roll:
 
#19
Milesy said:
paulored said:
The reason I ask is last time I did this I used to get a stitch quite quickly if I ate breakfast before the run and often felt a lack of energy if I didn't eat and went for the run as soon as I got up.

Any help will be much appreciated.
Eat something easy to digest and easy on your stomach such as refined porridge oats. Usually I stick my nose up at disgust refined/processed oats (like ready-brek type stuff), but it is a great source of quick energy before things like running and cycling, and a glass of orange juice.

You should also learn to prevent stitches as well. The first thing you need to do is change your breathing. Most people will breathe in when their left foot strikes, and breathe out when their right foot strikes. If you do this. Stop it. The right side of your body has more to bash of your Diaphragm than your left side. So breathing our on your right strike will cause a stitch much more. Breath in on your right strike, and out on your left. You will find it hard to get used to at first but you will find your stitches almost vanishing. You may still get the occasional slight, but no where near as much. :)
Where did you hear that from?

Sounds like a load of BS to me...... :x
 
#20
Ok I take that back...just done some research...

Who would have thought there was more to it than just putting one foot in front of the other!!
 

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