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Pre-Training Fitness

Merry Christmas All,


Just a quick overview of my situation -

- Started completely motivated and looking forward to getting well stuck into training
- Before I approached the army I ran at 15 mins - 2.4km trained on treadmill to get myself down to 12.5 min - 2.4 km
- Been in the system for well over 7 months now
- Passed all my fitness tests at the ADSC
- Now awaiting first phases of training
- Have taken a massive step back from running/training due to the long drawn out current process of joining the reserves and other things distracting me from training
- Don't want to let myself down or the section I'm hopefully joining
- Starting to worry that I'm not going to be fit enough to keep up with all the other fella's at the barracks.

I'm looking to get some advice on how to create a beneficial fitness routine to help increase both my run time and also looking for people who have been in similar situations and how the got their arse into gear.

I'm currently a member at a local gym but without a proper routine I'm seriously starting to fall behind on what I should be doing.

ADSC run time - 12 min 15 sec
Passed all strength tests.

Would really appreciate some advice, tips or an overview on what I should be doing, when and how many times a week.

Tried speaking to the barracks but they keep telling me not to worry and that they will advise what I should be doing when I join them. I'm fearful that when I do join that I'll be at a level of fitness that I've actually gone back on myself.

Not looking for somebody to wipe my arse, just need some positive and constructive advise please.

Like I say would really appreciate any positive input or pointers.

Many thanks indeed!
 
Last edited:

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
There's a ton of it already in the recruiting forum.. but for what it's worth -

Start with your eating. You want to train like a monster, you have to eat like one. Eat four meals a day and suppliment it with fruit. You won't be able to sit still after a fortnight of that. Go on youtube and see what the bodybuilders eat (not powerlifters, they eat pies and chocolate ice cream)

Treadmill is good for precision work, but be aware that 1.5 on a treadmill isn't the same as 1.5 on tarmac.

Get circuit training - it's brill.
 
There's a ton of it already in the recruiting forum.. but for what it's worth -

Start with your eating. You want to train like a monster, you have to eat like one. Eat four meals a day and suppliment it with fruit. You won't be able to sit still after a fortnight of that. Go on youtube and see what the bodybuilders eat (not powerlifters, they eat pies and chocolate ice cream)

Treadmill is good for precision work, but be aware that 1.5 on a treadmill isn't the same as 1.5 on tarmac.

Get circuit training - it's brill.

Nothing wrong with most of your post but the army dosn't need body builders.

Remember an under 30 male should be able to run 1.5 miles in less than 10:30.

A lot of blokes I know, many over 40 can run it in under 9:30 after doing 75 press ups and 75 sit ups.
 
There's a ton of it already in the recruiting forum.. but for what it's worth -

Start with your eating. You want to train like a monster, you have to eat like one. Eat four meals a day and suppliment it with fruit. You won't be able to sit still after a fortnight of that. Go on youtube and see what the bodybuilders eat (not powerlifters, they eat pies and chocolate ice cream)

Treadmill is good for precision work, but be aware that 1.5 on a treadmill isn't the same as 1.5 on tarmac.

Get circuit training - it's brill.
Yet another reason people should never ask advice on an internet. In this case, getting shit advice from civvies.



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Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
Nothing wrong with most of your post but the army dosn't need body builders.

Remember an under 30 male should be able to run 1.5 miles in less than 10:30.

A lot of blokes I know, many over 40 can run it in under 9:30 after doing 75 press ups and 75 sit ups.

Doesn't matter. Any kind of training regime needs to be supported by top quality eating. You're not going to become a body builder if you're not lifting, are you? If you try to eat as much as one of those guys who've been steadfastly eating as much as possible for years, you probably won't manage it, but you'll be eating the right stuff - which is going to equate to a spot on training diet isn't it?

The reason I tend to think of lifters when diet comes up is because youtube is full of guys who just love to talk about lifting and all around it.
 
Doesn't matter. Any kind of training regime needs to be supported by top quality eating. You're not going to become a body builder if you're not lifting, are you? If you try to eat as much as one of those guys who've been steadfastly eating as much as possible for years, you probably won't manage it, but you'll be eating the right stuff - which is going to equate to a spot on training diet isn't it?

The reason I tend to think of lifters when diet comes up is because youtube is full of guys who just love to talk about lifting and all around it.

So, you thought offering the advice to eat like bodybuilders do, to someone who clearly has limited common-sense, would have no down-side to it?


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
Last edited:
D-eng94, have you already been adopted by your parent unit, or are you awaiting attestation and uniform issue ?
Your unit will have physical training instructors and recruiters who should be able to assist you with fitness, since it's one of the major failure points at phase one training the Army even published a poster for recruits outlining various exercises for you.


Posted from the limits of sight and sound (iOS or Android)
 
D-eng94, have you already been adopted by your parent unit, or are you awaiting attestation and uniform issue ?
Your unit will have physical training instructors and recruiters who should be able to assist you with fitness, since it's one of the major failure points at phase one training the Army even published a poster for recruits outlining various exercises for you.


Posted from the limits of sight and sound (iOS or Android)

Now, THAT is a sensible post!


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
Okay first things first, you do need to sort out a proper diet plan - healthy living is 70% diet, 30% fitness. However as I ain't a nutritionist, I shall refrain from offering dietary advice.
Lack of motivation is one of the signs of over training - but you have also clearly lost sight of your ultimate goal. So maybe you need to have a think about that. You need to set yourself small goals that will all combine to form your ultimate goal. Even if it's; I WILL go out for a walk today.
Fitness wise, you need to start building up a baseline of fitness, before moving onto other forms of training. Google "beginner triathlon training programmes". Training, as if you will be competing in a triathlon, is the best way that I know, apart from boxing training to get someone fit enough for the Army. Both are excellent forms of cross training as well, so that will help prevent over use injuries and to stave off boredom.
Also, if you are a member of a gym, then make use of the classes that they may offer. If you have any specific questions on anything, then feel free to pm me. Good luck.


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Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
So, you thought offering the advice to eat like bodybuilders do, to someone who clearly has limited common-sense, would have no down-side to it?


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)

Nowt wrong with eating like a lifter. I eat like one and have energy coming out of my ears. Eating good is without doubt the secret to training good and it gets overlooked pretty much every time when people ask about getting fit. Squaddies don't get taught it (not sure if PTI's do?...Ho?) and gyms would rather promote good working out than good eating because they can sell working out, can't they?

Proper eating is absolutely fundamental to proper fitness. I heard a belter the other day -

You can't outrun a shit diet.

How true that is.
 
The best advice I can give you is to join British Military Fitness, BMF will help you establish core fitness which is the key to any stamina training of which you will require to pass phase 1.
BMF will cost you £35 a month for unlimited sessions, I recommend 3-4 sessions a week, each session is 1hour long and taken by current or ex PTI's and is based on actual military fitness sessions, they will assess your fitness, grade you on your fitness level and advise you on diet and training, so worth the money.
At 47 and 22 years service under my belt I went to BMF to loose some excess pounds and to re-establish my fitness after 3 years away from the green machine
 
Nowt wrong with eating like a lifter. I eat like one and have energy coming out of my ears. Eating good is without doubt the secret to training good and it gets overlooked pretty much every time when people ask about getting fit. Squaddies don't get taught it (not sure if PTI's do?...Ho?) and gyms would rather promote good working out than good eating because they can sell working out, can't they?

Proper eating is absolutely fundamental to proper fitness. I heard a belter the other day -

You can't outrun a shit diet.

How true that is.
The problem is DL is that the subject of nutrition is a very complex one believe it or not. "Eating your five a day", maybe fine for most civvies, but for anyone who needs to train to the standards of the British Army is something else. So much depends on an individual's age body shape, metabolism, etc - hence why sportsmen have tailor made diet plans. And it's for this reason that soldiers aren't taught the subject more in depth. Because it is a specialist subject.



Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
The problem is DL is that the subject of nutrition is a very complex one believe it or not. "Eating your five a day", maybe fine for most civvies, but for anyone who needs to train to the standards of the British Army is something else. So much depends on an individual's age body shape, metabolism, etc - hence why sportsmen have tailor made diet plans. And it's for this reason that soldiers aren't taught the subject more in depth. Because it is a specialist subject.



Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)

The person who needs to do the diet plan though, is yourself. You can get a pretty good generic one which is much better than a simple 'five a day'

Looking back, the diet in basic was ******* shocking considering the way we were pushed each day. Train like an athlete, eat like a tramp - if you got time to eat at all, that is. Then wonder why everyone finishes basic about two stone lighter than they started.

The basics of a good diet is the same for everyone - excluding certain specialist requirements.

Plenty clean protein, plenty brown carbs, plenty veg. No processed foods and no empty calories like bread or beer. As you get fitter, your body tells you what to do, so the process is entirely symbiotic. So I'd always say this. Find out what's good and eat lots and lots of it. Over a fair bit of time, listening to your body and swotting up (I listen to the lifters because they put their money where their mouth is and have something to show for it) you'll get a feel for what you're doing and can tweak it accordingly.
 
To be honest, my pre-joining diet was a normal northern one of whatever Mum cooked, or you starved. I just ran more and followed the fitness guide the acio gave me and went judo twice a week.


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R

rooster-teeth

Guest
Merry Christmas All,


Just a quick overview of my situation -

- Started completely motivated and looking forward to getting well stuck into training
- Before I approached the army I ran at 15 mins - 2.4km trained on treadmill to get myself down to 12.5 min - 2.4 km
- Been in the system for well over 7 months now
- Passed all my fitness tests at the ADSC
- Now awaiting first phases of training
- Have taken a massive step back from running/training due to the long drawn out current process of joining the reserves and other things distracting me from training
- Don't want to let myself down or the section I'm hopefully joining
- Starting to worry that I'm not going to be fit enough to keep up with all the other fella's at the barracks.

I'm looking to get some advice on how to create a beneficial fitness routine to help increase both my run time and also looking for people who have been in similar situations and how the got their arse into gear.

I'm currently a member at a local gym but without a proper routine I'm seriously starting to fall behind on what I should be doing.

ADSC run time - 12 min 15 sec
Passed all strength tests.

Would really appreciate some advice, tips or an overview on what I should be doing, when and how many times a week.

Tried speaking to the barracks but they keep telling me not to worry and that they will advise what I should be doing when I join them. I'm fearful that when I do join that I'll be at a level of fitness that I've actually gone back on myself.

Not looking for somebody to wipe my arse, just need some positive and constructive advise please.

Like I say would really appreciate any positive input or pointers.

Many thanks indeed!


Mate keep in mind you are not training to be an Astronaut.

Don't over complicate things, you are joining the reserves, getting fit/fitter should be enjoyable and its not hard to eat well and to have a varied and rewarding training regime.

Find a few decent routes with a few hills thrown in and get amongst it 3-4 days a week with a couple of targetted gym sessions and a decent swim every week. I would personally swerve running machines but again thats my personal choice, decent footwear is a must too.

You've said you are at a good level of strength so you are halfway there, remember that at most, in a support arm or Corps, you'll carry out mandatory fitness tests every year and unless your intended lot are really keen a few decent fraggings on exercise or a march and shoot type affair will be your required ceiling limit. However thats not to say you shouldn't aim to make life easier for you by being as fit as possible, that can be achieved in a couple of months.

Try this for some ideas.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0752805894/?tag=armrumser-21
 
The person who needs to do the diet plan though, is yourself. You can get a pretty good generic one which is much better than a simple 'five a day'

Looking back, the diet in basic was ******* shocking considering the way we were pushed each day. Train like an athlete, eat like a tramp - if you got time to eat at all, that is. Then wonder why everyone finishes basic about two stone lighter than they started.

The basics of a good diet is the same for everyone - excluding certain specialist requirements.

Plenty clean protein, plenty brown carbs, plenty veg. No processed foods and no empty calories like bread or beer. As you get fitter, your body tells you what to do, so the process is entirely symbiotic. So I'd always say this. Find out what's good and eat lots and lots of it. Over a fair bit of time, listening to your body and swotting up (I listen to the lifters because they put their money where their mouth is and have something to show for it) you'll get a feel for what you're doing and can tweak it accordingly.

All you need is a reasonable diet.

You just need the motivation to go out and do fitness training, particularly running.

There is so much information about these days, people waste far too much time, searching for the ideal which even so-called experts can't all agree about, trawling through the interent, asking random ARSSERS etc etc, rather than actually going out and doing something.
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
There is so much information about these days, people waste far too much time, searching for the ideal which even so-called experts can't all agree about, trawling through the interent, asking random ARSSERS etc etc, rather than actually going out and doing something.

Couldn't agree more - but it's like this... proper eating is the difference between a good job and half a job, so why knock **** out of yourself for less than the result than you deserve, when a bit of swotting and a few good diet choices will bring you the best results for your efforts? It's going to hurt just as much whatever you eat, so may as well get all the bang for your buck, no?
 
Couldn't agree more - but it's like this... proper eating is the difference between a good job and half a job, so why knock **** out of yourself for less than the result than you deserve, when a bit of swotting and a few good diet choices will bring you the best results for your efforts? It's going to hurt just as much whatever you eat, so may as well get all the bang for your buck, no?
The analogy that I use for my clients is this: You can fuel the engine with any old fuel that gets it running, but for optimal performance you need high grade fuel.
Again, its alright to eat crap all day, and then train really hard, when you're in your twenties, its a bit different to when you try and do the same thing in your late thirties and forties though.
So I would definitely agree with you that eating the correct diet is very important. Even if its just cutting out processed crap for four or five days a week. Especially as we get older as well.
 

Banshee123

Swinger
Eating paleo worked pretty good for me. Got me lean as hell and my energy levels were pretty good. But I always balanced it out with a cheat day every week plus I drank pints upon pints of milk.
 

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