PQO limited in that trade?

That is surprising.
The point is they are Doctors with an intimate understanding of the environment their patients are likely to work in. Their SQEP comes from that, not being combat ready pilots.
As you say, the RAF and RN used to do it, and then decided it was “too expensive”. So the two main flying Services are unique amongst nearly all other Navies and Air Forces in not having fully qualified Flight Surgeons.
 
The point is they are Doctors with an intimate understanding of the environment their patients are likely to work in. Their SQEP comes from that, not being combat ready pilots.
As you say, the RAF and RN used to do it, and then decided it was “too expensive”. So the two main flying Services are unique amongst nearly all other Navies and Air Forces in not having fully qualified Flight Surgeons.
Going back 30 years, there was a female RAMC doctor Gazelle pilot around who did a tour in Belize. Wouldn’t there be a major medical ethics issue with a doctor flying an aircraft armed for anything but self defence?
 
Going back 30 years, there was a female RAMC doctor Gazelle pilot around who did a tour in Belize. Wouldn’t there be a major medical ethics issue with a doctor flying an aircraft armed for anything but self defence?

The perks of being a CO is you sit in the capacity seat, plus you know enough people in the bazaars. I enjoy taking on knotty N1 issues whilst letting the team get on with stuff (and it keeps me out their hair).

In the past (cf recent posts in the Ally thread) it was acceptable to mix your status as a non-combatant MO and combatant Military Officer. However in the HERRICK era (probably because it was the first sustained war for quite the while) the GMC got very rigid about a clear dividing line between the two.

I know this because one of my GDMOs wanted to go for selection, and after a couple of months of J1 bollocks, I got the full policy statement and provenance from a nice Col in the AMS.

I also had a GDMO who wanted to do flying training - because an RAMC peer of hers was doing exactly that. Again, interesting conversations with the Aviation Medical team in both the FAA and RAMC. She’s still mulling over a inter-service transfer request.

For me, stuff like this is the best part of Command; plus you get to learn interesting bits of random policy*.

*Your definition of “interesting” may vary.
 

enpointe

Clanker
There have, in the past, been MO(P) specialisations in the RAF and USAF.

I know of one, mid-to-late-90s, who was a qualified Jag pilot was well as an Av Med Dr (so he'll be a bit of a thickie then). I've also met an F3 pilot* who had studied medicine at Uni and learnt to fly on the UAS.

Maybe the legislation has changed in recent times, but I can say with certainty that we (the RAF) wouldn't put someone through FJ pilot trg with a caveat that they weren't allowed to deploy weaponry.

* - to be fair, as an F3 pilot, the only thing he'd risk killing in is people's goodwill due to his (likely) stinking chat and personality defects.


my understanding, based on recollections of my AMS TA service , a good few years ago

the problem with HCPs being part of 'teeth arm' deployment except when badged and armbanded as medicla personnel is related to issues under the Geneva Convention and the whole being seen to not put none combatants into combat roles

the stuff with MOs and flying - their 'war role' would be Av Med
 

enpointe

Clanker
Going back 30 years, there was a female RAMC doctor Gazelle pilot around who did a tour in Belize. Wouldn’t there be a major medical ethics issue with a doctor flying an aircraft armed for anything but self defence?
yes if Badged and armband / TRF as a medic

i think the whole scenario wit hthe various sandpits changed that but equally that was not a regualr war against formed army fightin under the GCs
 
yes if Badged and armband / TRF as a medic

i think the whole scenario wit hthe various sandpits changed that but equally that was not a regualr war against formed army fightin under the GCs
There’s a fundamental difference between a soldier medic who is “badged and armband / TRF” as a medic and a doctor who has taken the Hippocratic Oath. The former’s behaviour is governed by the law of armed contract, the latter by professional ethics.
 
The perks of being a CO is you sit in the capacity seat, plus you know enough people in the bazaars. I enjoy taking on knotty N1 issues whilst letting the team get on with stuff (and it keeps me out their hair).

In the past (cf recent posts in the Ally thread) it was acceptable to mix your status as a non-combatant MO and combatant Military Officer. However in the HERRICK era (probably because it was the first sustained war for quite the while) the GMC got very rigid about a clear dividing line between the two.

I know this because one of my GDMOs wanted to go for selection, and after a couple of months of J1 bollocks, I got the full policy statement and provenance from a nice Col in the AMS.

I also had a GDMO who wanted to do flying training - because an RAMC peer of hers was doing exactly that. Again, interesting conversations with the Aviation Medical team in both the FAA and RAMC. She’s still mulling over a inter-service transfer request.

For me, stuff like this is the best part of Command; plus you get to learn interesting bits of random policy*.

*Your definition of “interesting” may vary.

So further to that, if you wanted to go for selection as a PQO Nurse or Doctor, you’d have to cancel your registration with the NMC/GMC and on successful completion of badging, you’d be a badged officer?
 
So further to that, if you wanted to go for selection as a PQO Nurse or Doctor, you’d have to cancel your registration with the NMC/GMC and on successful completion of badging, you’d be a badged officer?
I would presume.

But why you wouldnt just become a badged UKSF Medical Officer?
 
Do you mean do the SFM course as an MO?

Yes.

I know a couple who did it back in the day, but am aware of a couple who are doing it now.

The change is massive, and from the outside looks like the “bleeding edge” of a certain type of medicine.
 
Yes.

I know a couple who did it back in the day, but am aware of a couple who are doing it now.

The change is massive, and from the outside looks like the “bleeding edge” of a certain type of medicine.

Apparently (in the Black Serpent days), it was a bit of an attendance course for the Doctors (who are generally a lot older than the MAs and CMTs that do it). However, they’ve supposedly clamped down on that now.

Whilst they now have their new pink belts, I don’t think we can say that become a qualified SFM is the same as ‘badging’ - at least not until they make SFMs it’s own trade, complete with command structure like SFCs.
 
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