PQO limited in that trade?

Happy Easter all

I have a potential opportunity to proceed as a PQO, but I have reservations this may close the door on other avenues.

If I become a PQO, will I be able to join another trade in the future of my career? I.e. commission as captain through PQO then after 2 to 4 years later move across to say logistics as my rank?

Is there a conversion course?
Or am I stuck in that specific PQ role?

Thanks in advance.
 

green_slime

War Hero
if you commission as a PQO and wanted to serve as a regular officer then you would need to complete the appropriate commissioning course, and move to the appropriate pay band. There are opportunities to serve in many different roles and units (including SF) if you want variety including staff jobs.
 
You remain as a PQO. If you wanted to transfer you would have to return to RMAS, do the year, then start again at 2Lt, by which point you would have likely gone over the maximum age limit.
 
If you are in a medical profession, you will also have to give up your professional registration.
 
This is all helpful, thank you.

To clarify, if I was a medical prof. and wanted to be a section officer of a logistic corp. I'd need to redo the entire RMAS course?

Even though I would be the same rank, and as far as I'm aware there is no specific trade logistic course?

There is no conversion course?

Would this be up to the CO of said unit or an army wide policy?

Same for reg and res?

Apologies for all the questions, its quite important and want to ensure I've been thorough in all avenues.
 
To clarify, if I was a medical prof. and wanted to be a section officer of a logistic corp. I'd need to redo the entire RMAS course?

Even though I would be the same rank, and as far as I'm aware there is no specific trade logistic course?

Yes, you are commissioned as a Captain as a PQO Medical Professional (sometimes a Lt) due to your professional qualifications and SME skills/knowledge/training.

There are specific Officer Trade Training courses for every capbadge.

There is no conversion course?

Correct, there is no conversion course.

if you were a Regular PQO, the 8 week course at RMAS is not equivalent to the 44 week course the Regulars undertake - hence you would have to complete the Regular course and commission as a 2Lt.

Would this be up to the CO of said unit or an army wide policy?
Same for reg and res?

It is an Army wide policy, for the Regulars.

Reserve is different as the Commissioning Course that you complete - CCS - is the same for both Army Reservists and Regular PQOs (8 weeks, 4 modules which are each 2 weeks).

It will also depend on what AOSB you have completed. If the PQO AOSB, you may also have to complete and pass the generic AOSB Main Board to be allowed to transfer over to another Reserve Unit.

Such a transfer would result in you becoming a 2Lt.
 
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If however you became a Reserve PQO (a 4 week course) you would have to complete the full 8 week CCS to become a Reserve Officer in a non PQO role - and you would be a 2Lt.
 
Broad principle - and this is tri-Service, all ranks.

Do not join up in one role with a latent intent / desire to achieve another role - join and go for your original desired job from the outset.

And whyever you'd want to go from being a medic to the RLC - just, why?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
May be a few years out of date but PQO used to have ability to do more than just qualified profession but still within their own Corps.

Thinking along lines of OC and COs of various Field Ambulances, their component squadrons, medical regiments.

PQO could do Staff College.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
If you are in a medical profession, you will also have to give up your professional registration.

Are you sure?

Known a couple over the years who were TA in a non medical unit in a non medical role.

However would agree that full time, maintaining one's registration would be difficult due to maintaining skills and completing statutory annual CPD.

Would also be a waste of money staying on register.
 
May be a few years out of date but PQO used to have ability to do more than just qualified profession but still within their own Corps.

Thinking along lines of OC and COs of various Field Ambulances, their component squadrons, medical regiments.

PQO could do Staff College.

This is still true. They can elect to do Officer Education courses (JOTAC, JCSC, ICSC etc)
And PQOs can still be OC's/CO's.
AMS MSOs aren't taking all those roles (yet)
 
Are you sure?

Known a couple over the years who were TA in a non medical unit in a non medical role.

However would agree that full time, maintaining one's registration would be difficult due to maintaining skills and completing statutory annual CPD.

Would also be a waste of money staying on register.
Certainly for MOs/NOs - their professional bodies are very hot on “not killing people (unless through fûck up)”.
 
Certainly for MOs/NOs - their professional bodies are very hot on “not killing people (unless through fûck up)”.

There have, in the past, been MO(P) specialisations in the RAF and USAF.

I know of one, mid-to-late-90s, who was a qualified Jag pilot was well as an Av Med Dr (so he'll be a bit of a thickie then). I've also met an F3 pilot* who had studied medicine at Uni and learnt to fly on the UAS.

Maybe the legislation has changed in recent times, but I can say with certainty that we (the RAF) wouldn't put someone through FJ pilot trg with a caveat that they weren't allowed to deploy weaponry.

* - to be fair, as an F3 pilot, the only thing he'd risk killing in is people's goodwill due to his (likely) stinking chat and personality defects.
 
There have, in the past, been MO(P) specialisations in the RAF and USAF.

I know of one, mid-to-late-90s, who was a qualified Jag pilot was well as an Av Med Dr (so he'll be a bit of a thickie then). I've also met an F3 pilot* who had studied medicine at Uni and learnt to fly on the UAS.

Maybe the legislation has changed in recent times, but I can say with certainty that we (the RAF) wouldn't put someone through FJ pilot trg with a caveat that they weren't allowed to deploy weaponry.

* - to be fair, as an F3 pilot, the only thing he'd risk killing in is people's goodwill due to his (likely) stinking chat and personality defects.
The RAMC still go through flying training - even AH-64, but none have deployed on the front line.
 

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