Power in FOBs

#2
All good sh!t for the REMFs but i think you will find new ideas on advanced CBA and Vehicle protection will create more interest here.
 
#4
Oh dear, it must be the season, is Looney thinking about joining up? Giving alternative power sources to FOBs can only be good for soldiers.

Low on everything, at least we have comms.
 
#8
Oh dear, it must be the season, is Looney thinking about joining up? Giving alternative power sources to FOBs can only be good for soldiers.

Low on everything, at least we have comms.
Not slating what's on offer isn't going to help the troops, the guys and girls out there doing the shit might want to hear about other ways to help them out maybe.
 
#9
Not having to carry as many batteries on patrol
Not having to Force Protect as many fuel convoys
Less specialists moving in to service/repair gennies that are running 24/7
Silent overwatch for recce
No battery changing for remote sensors etc
Looney, you are just that...
 

Bowmore_Assassin

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#10
Hate to say it but energy efficiency is 'green' and more importantly it means less expenditure on power in FOBs which means more money elsewhere...

Also, I am no expert but I assume this means less pax to maintain and fix stuff which means more pax on the ground or less people deployed.

All in all, it's all good. IMHO.


Sent from my iPhone using ARRSE app
 
#12
Good thread and thanks for the link to the video. It is a no brainer we will be using solar and wind in the future. Not just for hot and sandy places. Solar works well in all hemispheres and the technology is getting more efficient/smaller.
 
#13
The US Marines have two dedicated units to making FOBs completely self sufficient in as many areas as possible. Not just energy but the whole gamut of green initiatives - composting/food growth/energy conservation/water recycling etc.

Interesting stuff. I am impressed at the idea of a teeth arms unit landing in a remote location and essentially living off the land rather than living in the land with a resupply.
 
#14
If our price per Kwh is so small in UK but we are putting solar thermal on the swimming pool in Catterick (http://www.sol2o.co.uk/media/casestudies/catterickbarrackssoltherm.pdf), suntubes in bunkers in Instow (pg 50 http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/F7C3...969B22C/0/1107215SanctuaryMagNo402011_web.pdf) and Heat pumps in Sennybridge (Pg 44 same link). We sure as hell should be putting it in where our PPKwh is vastly more expensive at point of use in the most remote/hard/costly to resup FOBs and PBs.
 
#15
Interesting stuff, of course we could save fuel by refusing to let soldier recharge their ipods etc etc. :p

I wonder if the same tests would have worked in the uk though, or the arctic , or the jungle ?
 
#16
I am ex STRE but an Eng.Svyr so have little knowledge of electrical thingys.
Serious question - what size in sq.m array of photo-electric cells would it take to keep a 1 cu.m chest freezer powered.
I know there are variables - just 'ish will do for now.
I may have a cunning plan ...............
 
#19
Some useful technology here at the prototype stage, but they will have to solve the usual problems with membranes clogging up with crap. If they can get it to work, it will help with water treatment and power, but I suspect the electrical output will be quite low. However, even reducing the bulk of water required will ease the logistic chain.

BBC News - US researchers build 'waste water generator'

Researchers in the US have built a prototype device which they say can generate electricity from waste water.

The team at Pennsylvania State University says the technology would simultaneously treat the water.

They suggest the process could be adopted in developing countries, providing clean water and power for homes.


Details are published in the journal Science.

Scientists in the Netherlands have for some years been exploring the idea of generating renewable power along the country's coastline, where fresh water from rivers meets the salt water of the sea.

Using a process called reverse electrodialysis (RED), fresh water and seawater are placed in intermittent chambers separated by membranes, and an electrochemical charge is created.

A Norwegian company is developing a similar technology using saline and fresh water.

The Penn State team says RED technology is problematic because of the large number of membranes required, and because power plants have to be located by the sea.

They claim the number of membranes can be reduced and the power output boosted by combining the technology with what are called microbial fuel cells (MFCs). These use organic matter in solution to create an electric current - in this instance waste water.

The prototype technology also bypasses the need for salt water by using ammonium bicarbonate solution as a substitute, meaning the system could work in communities far from the sea.

The ammonium bicarbonate solution would be constantly recycled, using waste heat from local industry.

"If we treat waste water in just a microbial fuel cell, we don't create much power and it takes a long time," lead researcher Professor Bruce Logan told BBC News.

"In our process, we have the MFC part which is treating waste water and creating energy, and we have the RED stack which is just boosting that process, it's making it happen more efficiently."

He says the process could potentially be used anywhere, but could provide both clean water and power to communities in developing countries.

"The main application right now is in waste water treatment where you could effectively treat the water, but also gain some extra energy from waste heat.

"Instead of having a net drain, we have a net gain."

Professor Logan and colleagues have previously reported on how the combination of microbial fuel cells and electrodialysis could generate hydrogen supplies.
 
#20
I am ex STRE but an Eng.Svyr so have little knowledge of electrical thingys.
Serious question - what size in sq.m array of photo-electric cells would it take to keep a 1 cu.m chest freezer powered.
I know there are variables - just 'ish will do for now.
I may have a cunning plan ...............
Look on the back of the freezer for the information plate which will tell you the voltage (250V AC) and the power required (usually in Watts).

That figure should be a maximum of the power required for the duration of the freezing cycle, which could be 15 minutes or 15 hours, if you left the door open. I will assume 1000W or 1kW.

You will need an inverter which takes the DC power from the solar panel and converts it into 250V AC. The efficiency of that will vary but 50-80% is a good target depending on how much you pay. Reckon on 50% which means that you need a panel capable of providing 2000W.

However, most of that power will go to waste because the freezer won't necessarily be on when the sun is shining. And what happens at night when the freezer needs a burst of cold?

So, now put a set of lead acid batteries in between and a small regulator to manage the voltage. And you are now sorted...

Alternatively, buy a longer extension lead and plug the freezer into the mains! ;)

Lits
 

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