(Potentially) dodgy solicitor robbing an elderly

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Actions on encountering a fraudulent solicitor; See The Life and Times of Colonel Wintle.

Frederick Nye was a solicitor practising in Brighton. He had a somewhat eccentric client, a Mrs Wells, whose will he drew. That will appointed him as her sole executor and, after a few small specific legacies, the residue of her estate was left to him. When Wells died in 1947, Nye inherited in the region of £44,000 - a tidy sum in those days.

She had one extraordinary relative, Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Wintle MC. He led an extraordinary life.

Wintle commenced his campaign against Nye through correspondence. In this he made plain his opinion that Nye had taken advantage of Wells' eccentricity and had acted unprofessionally and in an ungentlemanly manner in drawing her will as he did and without her having the benefit of independent legal advice. However Wintle did not pull his punches. In the correspondence he accused Nye of stealing Wells’ money and of being a cad, a liar, a thief and an embezzler. Nye was unmoved. Thus as this was not getting Wintle anywhere, he decided on more direct measures.

In 1955 Wintle lured Nye to a flat in Hove. He did so by pretending to be Lord Norbury, a business acquaintance who Nye had not seen for many years. On entering the flat, Wintle set upon Nye. The urban myth is that Wintle debagged (i.e. removed the trousers of) Nye. However it is far more likely that, in the circumstances, when Wintle told Nye to remove his trousers, Nye did not demur - although had he done so, undoubtedly he would have been debagged! Wintle then required Nye to sign a document admitting to dishonest behaviour and to write a cheque for £1000 in favour of him. Nye was then photographed by Wintle, sans culottes and with a paper hat on his head, before being locked in a cupboard in the flat. Thereafter Wintle turned the trouserless Nye out into the street, before going to his London club where Nye’s trousers were displayed as a trophy!
 

robbo833

Clanker
Actions on encountering a fraudulent solicitor; See The Life and Times of Colonel Wintle.

Frederick Nye was a solicitor practising in Brighton. He had a somewhat eccentric client, a Mrs Wells, whose will he drew. That will appointed him as her sole executor and, after a few small specific legacies, the residue of her estate was left to him. When Wells died in 1947, Nye inherited in the region of £44,000 - a tidy sum in those days.

She had one extraordinary relative, Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Wintle MC. He led an extraordinary life.

Wintle commenced his campaign against Nye through correspondence. In this he made plain his opinion that Nye had taken advantage of Wells' eccentricity and had acted unprofessionally and in an ungentlemanly manner in drawing her will as he did and without her having the benefit of independent legal advice. However Wintle did not pull his punches. In the correspondence he accused Nye of stealing Wells’ money and of being a cad, a liar, a thief and an embezzler. Nye was unmoved. Thus as this was not getting Wintle anywhere, he decided on more direct measures.

In 1955 Wintle lured Nye to a flat in Hove. He did so by pretending to be Lord Norbury, a business acquaintance who Nye had not seen for many years. On entering the flat, Wintle set upon Nye. The urban myth is that Wintle debagged (i.e. removed the trousers of) Nye. However it is far more likely that, in the circumstances, when Wintle told Nye to remove his trousers, Nye did not demur - although had he done so, undoubtedly he would have been debagged! Wintle then required Nye to sign a document admitting to dishonest behaviour and to write a cheque for £1000 in favour of him. Nye was then photographed by Wintle, sans culottes and with a paper hat on his head, before being locked in a cupboard in the flat. Thereafter Wintle turned the trouserless Nye out into the street, before going to his London club where Nye’s trousers were displayed as a trophy!

I’m not sure that’s going to work in this case..
 

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