Potential female joining infantry

Dalef65

Old-Salt
Haha just trying to be polite. There are merits to every service of course and the British military as a whole is stronger by having an individual aviation based branch, and an amphibious branch. I know there is a lot of well-meaning banter between respective regiments and branches and i'm sure that whatever regiment i join will always hold a place in my heart as being 'the one' - i'll be sure to defend it with the strongest of loyalty ;)
Yes I know you were trying to be polite, and you've been very articulate throughout this thread.

I was pointing to your inadvertent reference to RN personnel as "soldiers". That might ruffle a few feathers with the seafarers.. :)
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Oh no! I completely forgot about that - constantly researching the army has made me think of all military personnel as soldiers :blush: what is the technical term that is most used for navy personnel? So i don't make the same mistake in the future - sailors? Seamen?
 
Listen very carefully, I shall say this only once. - Michelle Dubois ('Allo 'Allo Quotes)


There are three services:
Royal Navy
Army
Royal Air Force

They have, respectively:
Branches
Regiments & Corps
Trades

Populated with:
Sailors (Ratings & Officers)
Soldiers ( with 99 different words for Private)
Officers Airmen & Airwomen

Happy to help.
Oh and I think Marines Cadets is a fab plan, a little of everything there.
 

Dwarf

LE
Yes I know you were trying to be polite, and you've been very articulate throughout this thread.

I was pointing to your inadvertent reference to RN personnel as "soldiers". That might ruffle a few feathers with the seafarers.. :)
And with us soldiers as well.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Listen very carefully, I shall say this only once. - Michelle Dubois ('Allo 'Allo Quotes)'Allo 'Allo Quotes)


There are three services:
Royal Navy
Army
Royal Air Force

They have, respectively:
Branches
Regiments & Corps
Trades

Populated with:
Sailors (Ratings & Officers)
Soldiers ( with 99 different words for Private)
Officers Airmen & Airwomen

Happy to help.
Oh and I think Marines Cadets is a fab plan, a little of everything there.
Oh so i totally messed up my technical terms on that post :-o Well at least I know now so I won't make the same mistake again! Thanks for explaining it all so well... I'm aware that there is a lot of military colloquialisms too that if I join i'm going to have to learn and pick up -I should probably have a look on the ARRSEpedia for a bit of help!

Yeah the Marine cadets really appeals to me as it seems like they do such a diverse range of things.... the potential to go to do CATSEA and the Gibraltar cup is also great and i have to admit the uniform doesn't hurt!
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Ah those are some interesting languages.. German is so complex isn't it, but it's very structural and theoretical - there are rules for everything and everything is there for a reason.... Russian seems extremely hard to me! Congrats for understanding and being able to speak it! Even as an infantry officer the fact that you got to use your linguistic abilities is great! I guess you played a crucial part in many operations in terms of building bridges
I found German very easy, being from Yorkshire. Russian is an entirely different beast.

In terms of building bridges, I found my German extremely useful in Bosnia in 1993 because there were still many former Gastarbeiter (guest worker) who had done their time in Germany in the 1960s and 1970s. The ability to speak other languages and have a feel for the local culture and religion is crucial on operations. It saves an awful lot of misunderstanding and dangerous chaos. You quickly learn that most people are good folk.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Oh okay that makes sense. Yes it seems like languages such as russian and those that have a completely different script would be hardest to pick up - say arabic or mandarin or something like that.... whilst the romantic languages and germanic languages are easier for english speakers

That's very good to hear your linguistic capabilities paid off and were of much use - at present so many people travel either for work opportunities or a multitude of other factors and so you end up with many different languages being present in communities all around the world - large cities in particular.....
it makes a lot of sense and is wise what you are saying about the importance of language on operations - it is effectively a key differentiating factor from humans to animals and we have evolved language for a reason - to help forge connections and bond to our fellow human.... If i ever go on an operation I shall be sure to bear in mind what you have mentioned about the power of language.
 

Truxx

LE
There's something wrong with my laptop.
This thread has not loaded properly - I read that somebody wants to:
a) Join an infantry Regiment
b) Read a book
This has always been considered an oxy-moron where I come from.

Serious hat on:
@Northerngal May I say how erudite and polite you come across? A certain asset wherever you end up, military or otherwise. My incorrectly uniformed colleagues of ARRSE have given loads of exceptionally good information (very rare on here :) ) and I am impressed as to how you have considered it all and, and this is rare, responded.

I was not going to post on this thread, as I have no knowledge of what you asked - I was learning too!

But, as It has been mentioned and you referred to "the other branches" (ahem) I will leave three thoughts with you on behalf of the Royal Navy.

1. Your ability as a linguist would be of great interest to the Senior Service. I accept that we spend very little time digging holes and living in them, and I have nothing but respect for those that do. But the RN would stretch you evident academic ability. Have a look at Cryptographic Technician. The RN is on deployment all day, every day - the drawdown of Iraq and Afgan won't impact here.

2. The RN actively encourage promotion from the lower deck to commissioned levels. I'm even going to stick my neck out and say that it is a much greater trodden path than in the army.

3. I note that you are still sixth form, rather than university as yet. Many posters have said to look at OTC, and I would not argue with that. However, as you are at what appears to be a not very supportive school, I'd recommend the cadets. Which service won't really make much difference, but go Army if that's what takes your eye currently.

I'm trying to help, but I suspect I've just thrown more data into the heap!
Whatever you choose, I wish you well.
R3
An alternative view of the Royal Navy is that it is an expensive way of moving young officers genitalia across the globe.

not one that I would subscribe to though..........
 

Truxx

LE
I found German very easy, being from Yorkshire. Russian is an entirely different beast.

In terms of building bridges, I found my German extremely useful in Bosnia in 1993 because there were still many former Gastarbeiter (guest worker) who had done their time in Germany in the 1960s and 1970s. The ability to speak other languages and have a feel for the local culture and religion is crucial on operations. It saves an awful lot of misunderstanding and dangerous chaos. You quickly learn that most people are good folk.
Who just want to get on with their lives...
 

JackSofty

War Hero
Like a daft bugger, to spite my father and to prove otherwise to the WO1 at the recruitment office (Dad said get a trade, WO1 said eff off, get some A levels and come back) I decided to join the Infantry. Best decision ever.
Did many jobs, got shoved around all over the place doing many things that I could do but was not 'qualified' to do and had a brilliant time.
Best decision ever but largely got lucky.

ETA often got mistaken for being an orrfficer (rupert or brass 'at) which had its advantages which were always exploited when booze was involved...

Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 
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Who doesnt have an awful time when they go to Wales at any time of the year?
It's fcuking snapped me a few times mukka. Fcuking morale hoover of a place.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Like a daft bugger, to spite my father and to prove otherwise to the WO1 at the recruitment office (Dad said get a trade, WO1 said eff off, get some A levels and come back) I decided to join the Infantry. Best decision ever.
Did many jobs, got shoved around all over the place doing many things that I could do but was not 'qualified' to do and had a brilliant time.
Best decision ever but largely got lucky.

ETA often got mistaken for being an orrfficer (rupert or brass 'at) which had its advantages which were always exploited when booze was involved...

Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
It’s really great to hear that the infantry worked out for you well! Some people jump into decisions at an early stage in their life when they’ve not got it all figured out yet and don’t even know what they want themselves - sometimes that turns out well for them and sadly other times it must lead to a life full of regrets and lost chances...

it seems like you belong to the first category and had some amazing experiences whilst being an infantryman...to a young lad especially it must have been quite cool to be able to do all the stuff you mentioned despite not having the qualifications and it seemed like you experienced a lot more than most young people do nowadays

Can’t blame you for taking advantage of that! :-D
 
I will add another consideration; the Royal Signals has a long history of female soldiers and officers, and I've work for and with some outstanding female RSMs and Officers, and had some astoundingly competent female soldiers, and astoundingly awkward ones too. Just like the males.

What the signals does have is an SF regiment, 18 sigs, if you want to do 'combat' then SF is likely the most likely route, and a tour or 2 with 18 Sigs would do future career no harm at all. They would appreciate the language skills also.

If you are a speaker of a language to any significant degree and join any reserve (I still recommend the OTC route), you should be able to go to the defence school of languages, do a test to establish language level and get paid more.

And as I side note, I found learning Japanese easier than French, because the notation was different my brain didn't try to read it as English. Learning mandarin afterwards was more difficult as my brain tried to do Japanese. But my ability in most languages (including English!) Is rudimentary at best.
 

Hollz2412

Swinger
Yeah the Marine cadets really appeals to me as it seems like they do such a diverse range of things.... the potential to go to do CATSEA and the Gibraltar cup is also great and i have to admit the uniform doesn't hurt!
If you’re looking to join the marine cadets as an ex sea cadet it’s a great thing to do. Seeing that you show an interest in all the branches with the marine cadets it will offer you an insite into the navy and marines if you wanted. The cadets offer week long experiences down at Raleigh which give you basically a week doing most of the things a sailor would do in training. You get to talk to the training team there and they give you loads of background and advice for if you are wanting to join. I personally did it myself and found it incredibly interesting and informative. Just ask your CO at your local unit try and get onto them ASAP even with lockdown cuz they can get you loaded onto Westminster which means you can access courses quicker.
If you’re lucky depending on how north you are you might end up northern area who are well known to have the best marine cadets.
If you want anymore info let me know.
 

Truxx

LE
A thought occurred. I wish more young folks, and their parents, and maybe even some employers would read threads like this. Then perhaps they might form a view that serving one's country is not the reserve of the knuckle-dragging underclass, rather a meritocracy like no other.

It is also much more advanced in diversity than anyone would have you believe. Back in the 70s my first troop ssgt and my admin sgt were both afro-carribean. And I had both black and asian soldiers under command. In the 1970s.

By the mid 1990s, when I commanded my regiment, all trades were open to females. Stevedores, Railwaypersons the lot, not just drivers. They were tough, resourceful and, quite simply part of the team.

Equal pay too.

Imagine my surprise therefore when I left the army and as part of my "what do I do next?" quest was shortlisted for a senior production post in a film production company (no names no pack drill)

Over lunch the CEO sidled over and said that he had enjoyed the discussion we had (interview) but he was worried. They had lots of women in the business he said. And they were not sure how I would get on, having been in the army so long.

I finished my sandwich, made my excuses and left.

As an aside that particular company went to the wall.
 
I will add another consideration; the Royal Signals has a long history of female soldiers and officers, and I've work for and with some outstanding female RSMs and Officers, and had some astoundingly competent female soldiers, and astoundingly awkward ones too. Just like the males.

What the signals does have is an SF regiment, 18 sigs, if you want to do 'combat' then SF is likely the most likely route, and a tour or 2 with 18 Sigs would do future career no harm at all. They would appreciate the language skills also.

If you are a speaker of a language to any significant degree and join any reserve (I still recommend the OTC route), you should be able to go to the defence school of languages, do a test to establish language level and get paid more.

And as I side note, I found learning Japanese easier than French, because the notation was different my brain didn't try to read it as English. Learning mandarin afterwards was more difficult as my brain tried to do Japanese. But my ability in most languages (including English!) Is rudimentary at best.
I believe that there's been a serious decline in numbers of females joining R Signals. I suspect that women are finding it easier to succeed elsewhere so the Army is less of an attractive option than it once was. 18 Sigs is a golden opportunity if you're willing to work at a marriage breaking intensity. Worth noting that the med corps has a significant presence there too.
 
Fair play to the OP, and any other young 'un, who has the widest choice of employment in or out of the Services but is still considering joining the infantry, the last or only option for many.

Times change, but the role of the infantry was brought back into stark reality for me whilst reading 'Forward Into Hell', which follows the fortunes of 3 PARA during their Falklands campaign.

The detail of life's privations for the infantryman are timeless.
Enduring the weather, grossly overloaded marches across harsh terrain.
No idea where they are, how far they've walked or how far they have to keep going until they can rest, eat and have a brew.
Trying to keep feet from disintegrating in cold and wet conditions.
Digging in.
Sentry duty.
Load up and march again.

It was 1982, but reads like the Retreat From Moscow.

And the Task Force was the best troops that anyone could muster.

The accounts of the hand to hand fighting on Mt. Longdon leave the reader in no doubt as to how primaeval war for the infantry can become, no matter what the date on the calendar is.

Be careful what you wish for, and good luck.
 
A thought occurred. I wish more young folks, and their parents, and maybe even some employers would read threads like this. Then perhaps they might form a view that serving one's country is not the reserve of the knuckle-dragging underclass, rather a meritocracy like no other.
Being a short arrse with long arms, I resemble that remark.
 
Oh no! I completely forgot about that - constantly researching the army has made me think of all military personnel as soldiers :blush: what is the technical term that is most used for navy personnel? So i don't make the same mistake in the future - sailors? Seamen?
You've had loads of good advice on here, from far more intelligent than myself. Although not a female of the species I am on the short side, nearer 5' than 6'. I've never been bothered about my lack of inches, my ego made up for my height deficiency, but it can have drawbacks on the physical side.

Last tour in Borneo in the mid 60's I'd made the mistake of passing a signals cadre. This entailed me carrying not far off my body weight. I weighed in at 9 stone, 126 lbs, with over 100 on my back. I could manage this for 6-7 hours, but after that I began to struggle. When the officer was there, which was most of the time, this never happened. He ensured myself and the bren gunner were relieved so we carried our equipment alternate hours, thus enabling us to last all the patrol. One sgt didn't see it that way, and that's how I found out my physical limit. He wasn't too happy, had the audacity to say I wasn't fit, totally ignoring that he was built like the proverbial, and was carrying only 35 lbs on his back! I offered to run against the fittest man in his platoon until one of us dropped, on our return to Singers. He declined. This will have a bearing on what you can actually do physically.

You're 16 so you have a few more years to grow and fill out before reaching your final height and weight. Regardless of what the sgt thought that day, I had done my best. That is what you have to do, your best. This includes your chosen field, whateffer that may be. Your choice enjoy, and good luck.
 

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