Potential female joining infantry

it seems like the majority of people on here are really advising me to pursue my education which is very understandable. As young adults we often think short sighted and don’t consider the various ups and downs in life that could arise in later years - like a previous poster made a point if I am injured as an infanteer I’ll be in quite a tricky position without any qualifications -

That genuinely does seem like a good option and avenue to pursue and since I didn’t know much about it before reading these forums I will have to do some more looking into it, the fact that I would get a degree to back me up incase the military doesn’t work out somehow and even for if I don’t choose it as a lifelong career, whilst simultaneously getting an idea of military life and ofcourse the benefits such as the travel And experiences is very attractive
I wish I’d had half your common sense when I was your age.
























Or even now, to be fair.
 
Sounds like you had an awful time out there.

Sending hugs x x x
Who doesnt have an awful time when they go to Wales at any time of the year?
 
Here is a guide to social life in the British Army and what you might look forwards to
Nineteenth century ARRSE :)
“Tommy likes to raise his voice whenever airing his opinions, yet there is no disorder, any tendency to which would be soon suppressed by the smart corporal on canteen duty, who is pacing up and down, occasionally offering a remark on the subject under discussion.”

A bit like here really then...
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
“Tommy likes to raise his voice whenever airing his opinions, yet there is no disorder, any tendency to which would be soon suppressed by the smart corporal on canteen duty, who is pacing up and down, occasionally offering a remark on the subject under discussion.”

A bit like here really then...
How about this .

... the life of the young man in the Guards who is blessed with good private means is pleasant enough ; his mornings, and occasionally the greater part of his day, are taken up with, the drills and routine duties of his profession, which are no great tax on his intelligence or on his physique, and his spare time is devoted to those amusements common to young men of his class and education....

...In this matter of leave the Guardsman is fortunate above his brethren in the cavalry and infantry of the line the subaltern of the Guards rarely finds any difficulty in getting away for four months out of the twelve, and his captain is even more fortunate, as he can generally count on six months' leave in the year.
though it also says

... the summer will probably find him with his regiment getting through musketry and field- training at Pirbright, a healthy spot not far from Aldershot,
 

Truxx

LE
Normally, at this point, it is an arrse tradition to ask the original poster if the thread is going as they hoped it would. But actually it has been quite good, and apart from a bit of "ooo join my capbadge" it has all been quite sensible stuff.

You bunch of softies you.

PS don't bother with the RLC. Very little left that is genuinely cool and exciting. No ships big or small, no amphibious trucks, no equestrian training for officers, no motorcycle training for officers, no beaver flight (!) no tank transporter regiment, no chunkies, no big F off transport regiments no railways, no hovercraft, no vehicle trials unit, we even let the infantry drive their own armoured personnel carriers.

There are still the airborners, the box droppers, ATs and port ops I suppose. So it's not all doom and gloom.

I think there are still movers too.
 

Dwarf

LE
From that, I would suggest the Int Corps. Technologies change, but there will always be a need for language skills and in particular for the next 20 years or so, the Middle Eastern languages.

One area where the UK has lead the world has been Weapons Intelligence, by combining the skills of the Ammo Techs, RMP and MI we have made massive gains in Theatres. The roles are both physical and mentally challenging (whilst on ops) and leads nicely into SRR and other shadowy organisations.
This is a very good point, especially as things like SRR etc. need language ability. You mention you speak more than one language so it is easier for a multi-lingual person to pick up other languages. (My daughter grew up tri-lingual, English, Catalan and Spanish and she tacked on fluent French, good ability in Arabic and a smatter of Japanese and is now learning Australian.) So you will have an advantage over others there if you decide to go down that route.

Also as you are coming round to the idea of commissioning then while doing Uni I would suggest an option is to join the AR rather than the OTC. I did that, (TA) and you get an interesting mix of people which you won't get nearly as much in the OTC and this will help you relate to or better understand the people you will have to command later on. As the lowest link on the food chain you get an insight into how the junior soldiers feel and the tasks they have to do from their perspective. Also, and this I found extremely valuable when I got comissioned, is that you get a chance to observe the officers from the lad's point of view. You can see who are respected, who are liked, who are considered total idiots, who gets the best out of the lads and why, and what you should be avoiding doing.
There has been this debate on Arrse before and there are solid reasons for doing both OTC and AR, it will be up to you to decide though I think it may come down to the quality of the OTC and AR unit.
If you choose a decent university and a fair sized town then you could pick your type of AR unit which may help you in your final Army choice.
Newcastle for example has Infantry, has (had) Para and a wide range of other arm units, Durham has easy access to Newcastle so you would have choice.
Just another factor for you to mull over.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
The Army turned me into a Russian and German interpreter. I was an Infantry officer for 22 years. Linguists are essential in all parts of the Army. Being a linguist gets you into some very interesting jobs.
Ah those are some interesting languages.. German is so complex isn't it, but it's very structural and theoretical - there are rules for everything and everything is there for a reason.... Russian seems extremely hard to me! Congrats for understanding and being able to speak it! Even as an infantry officer the fact that you got to use your linguistic abilities is great! I guess you played a crucial part in many operations in terms of building bridges
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Here is a guide to social life in the British Army and what you might look forwards to
Nineteenth century ARRSE :)
Just had a little read through that and it seems like such a good read! Thanks for posting it will definitely read it fully as soon as i can - you can definitely tell it was written by someone with a true military background and who understands how everything actually works experience wise - not just formally
 

Truxx

LE
Ah those are some interesting languages.. German is so complex isn't it, but it's very structural and theoretical - there are rules for everything and everything is there for a reason.... Russian seems extremely hard to me! Congrats for understanding and being able to speak it! Even as an infantry officer the fact that you got to use your linguistic abilities is great! I guess you played a crucial part in many operations in terms of building bridges
He did. Now he just acts as the site mystic meg.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
With your flare for languages, your obvious intelligence and apparent determination I would strongly suggest the Int Corps and maybe as a "taster", look at joining the Int Corps Reserves?

Good luck
Thank you for the suggestion, i'm frankly flattered that you think I could make it and am glad my determination has shown through my words... yes that could definitely be something to do at university and as a previous poster said at Sandhurst you get to visit lots of units before making a capbadge decision so any experience in the reserves will only add to this and benefit me
 
There's something wrong with my laptop.
This thread has not loaded properly - I read that somebody wants to:
a) Join an infantry Regiment
b) Read a book
This has always been considered an oxy-moron where I come from.

Serious hat on:
@Northerngal May I say how erudite and polite you come across? A certain asset wherever you end up, military or otherwise. My incorrectly uniformed colleagues of ARRSE have given loads of exceptionally good information (very rare on here :) ) and I am impressed as to how you have considered it all and, and this is rare, responded.

I was not going to post on this thread, as I have no knowledge of what you asked - I was learning too!

But, as It has been mentioned and you referred to "the other branches" (ahem) I will leave three thoughts with you on behalf of the Royal Navy.

1. Your ability as a linguist would be of great interest to the Senior Service. I accept that we spend very little time digging holes and living in them, and I have nothing but respect for those that do. But the RN would stretch you evident academic ability. Have a look at Cryptographic Technician. The RN is on deployment all day, every day - the drawdown of Iraq and Afgan won't impact here.

2. The RN actively encourage promotion from the lower deck to commissioned levels. I'm even going to stick my neck out and say that it is a much greater trodden path than in the army.

3. I note that you are still sixth form, rather than university as yet. Many posters have said to look at OTC, and I would not argue with that. However, as you are at what appears to be a not very supportive school, I'd recommend the cadets. Which service won't really make much difference, but go Army if that's what takes your eye currently.

I'm trying to help, but I suspect I've just thrown more data into the heap!
Whatever you choose, I wish you well.
R3
 

Northerngal

Clanker
This is a very good point, especially as things like SRR etc. need language ability. You mention you speak more than one language so it is easier for a multi-lingual person to pick up other languages. (My daughter grew up tri-lingual, English, Catalan and Spanish and she tacked on fluent French, good ability in Arabic and a smatter of Japanese and is now learning Australian.) So you will have an advantage over others there if you decide to go down that route.

Also as you are coming round to the idea of commissioning then while doing Uni I would suggest an option is to join the AR rather than the OTC. I did that, (TA) and you get an interesting mix of people which you won't get nearly as much in the OTC and this will help you relate to or better understand the people you will have to command later on. As the lowest link on the food chain you get an insight into how the junior soldiers feel and the tasks they have to do from their perspective. Also, and this I found extremely valuable when I got comissioned, is that you get a chance to observe the officers from the lad's point of view. You can see who are respected, who are liked, who are considered total idiots, who gets the best out of the lads and why, and what you should be avoiding doing.
There has been this debate on Arrse before and there are solid reasons for doing both OTC and AR, it will be up to you to decide though I think it may come down to the quality of the OTC and AR unit.
If you choose a decent university and a fair sized town then you could pick your type of AR unit which may help you in your final Army choice.
Newcastle for example has Infantry, has (had) Para and a wide range of other arm units, Durham has easy access to Newcastle so you would have choice.
Just another factor for you to mull over.
This is a very good point, especially as things like SRR etc. need language ability. You mention you speak more than one language so it is easier for a multi-lingual person to pick up other languages. (My daughter grew up tri-lingual, English, Catalan and Spanish and she tacked on fluent French, good ability in Arabic and a smatter of Japanese and is now learning Australian.) So you will have an advantage over others there if you decide to go down that route.

Also as you are coming round to the idea of commissioning then while doing Uni I would suggest an option is to join the AR rather than the OTC. I did that, (TA) and you get an interesting mix of people which you won't get nearly as much in the OTC and this will help you relate to or better understand the people you will have to command later on. As the lowest link on the food chain you get an insight into how the junior soldiers feel and the tasks they have to do from their perspective. Also, and this I found extremely valuable when I got comissioned, is that you get a chance to observe the officers from the lad's point of view. You can see who are respected, who are liked, who are considered total idiots, who gets the best out of the lads and why, and what you should be avoiding doing.
There has been this debate on Arrse before and there are solid reasons for doing both OTC and AR, it will be up to you to decide though I think it may come down to the quality of the OTC and AR unit.
If you choose a decent university and a fair sized town then you could pick your type of AR unit which may help you in your final Army choice.
Newcastle for example has Infantry, has (had) Para and a wide range of other arm units, Durham has easy access to Newcastle so you would have choice.
Just another factor for you to mull over.
Yes i have certainly heard that early exposure to languages enhances some part of the mind to make it easier to pick up other languages. Apparantly playing a musical instrument helps somewhat with that too - but that's just a speculation. Your daughter sounds like a true linguist! Does she have a job that allows her to put those impressive skills to use hopefully? But I guess no matter what you do languages will always be useful skills...

Ah okay I don't know much of course about the differences between the OTC and AR so I appreciate you explaining them for me. I can imagine it can only be a benefit to be surrounded by a mix of people so you learn what works with certain people and are exposed to more people to potentially command and lead

I feel like every officer should consider things from their soldier's point of view in order to relate better and form good connections with their soldiers. Therefore, it certainly would be a benefit if the AR is better for this than the OTC...
like i guess by being a student and having a variety of teachers you learn yourself what you should do and what not to do whilst teaching based on the teachers who have made the biggest impression on you - they lead by example

I hopefully will get into a larger university, especially as i'm keen to go to one with a sporting history and lots of opportunities there so that sounds hopeful...

Thanks for the in-depth answer!
 

Northerngal

Clanker
There's something wrong with my laptop.
This thread has not loaded properly - I read that somebody wants to:
a) Join an infantry Regiment
b) Read a book
This has always been considered an oxy-moron where I come from.

Serious hat on:
@Northerngal May I say how erudite and polite you come across? A certain asset wherever you end up, military or otherwise. My incorrectly uniformed colleagues of ARRSE have given loads of exceptionally good information (very rare on here :) ) and I am impressed as to how you have considered it all and, and this is rare, responded.

I was not going to post on this thread, as I have no knowledge of what you asked - I was learning too!

But, as It has been mentioned and you referred to "the other branches" (ahem) I will leave three thoughts with you on behalf of the Royal Navy.

1. Your ability as a linguist would be of great interest to the Senior Service. I accept that we spend very little time digging holes and living in them, and I have nothing but respect for those that do. But the RN would stretch you evident academic ability. Have a look at Cryptographic Technician. The RN is on deployment all day, every day - the drawdown of Iraq and Afgan won't impact here.

2. The RN actively encourage promotion from the lower deck to commissioned levels. I'm even going to stick my neck out and say that it is a much greater trodden path than in the army.

3. I note that you are still sixth form, rather than university as yet. Many posters have said to look at OTC, and I would not argue with that. However, as you are at what appears to be a not very supportive school, I'd recommend the cadets. Which service won't really make much difference, but go Army if that's what takes your eye currently.

I'm trying to help, but I suspect I've just thrown more data into the heap!
Whatever you choose, I wish you well.
R3
Haha I'm sure there are some very intelligent people in the infantry, although I admit it does not require as much on the academic side of things in terms of qualifications....

Ah I appreciate you saying that you know.... I was initially a bit scared to post on here admittedly as I thought my aspirations would instantly get shut down and everyone would say I was not cut out for it. I've been so pleasantly suprised and grateful for all the help everyone has given me.

Oh you are from the Royal Navy! Thank you so much for deciding to post and giving me an insight into another branch. I know there is a forum called Navy-Net but it is great to see you on here....

I will definitely look into that role - since I haven't really looked at other branches yet there is so much potential for knowledge and roles for me to explore there - thanks for directing me to one you think might suit me...
Once I understand that role i'll post and tell you what I make of it as right now the name alludes me as to what it could entail! =-D Yes the RN does seem like it is constantly active - well Britain once had the greatest navy in the world and i'm sure a lot of that has remained.. i'm just glad i'm not sea-sick so there is still the option for me of that branch

That sounds really good! The fact that there are many opportunities for soldiers to exceed on merit and rise through the ranks can only show the good morals and values of the RN as a whole...

Thank you for the suggestion of cadets. I actually was an army cadet for several years however had to give it up as the training nights eventually conflicted with my boxing training. However I am aware that the royal marine cadets train on different nights and so that may be a good option? As there is a sea cadet unit near me... i really enjoyed the practical and theoretical side of the cadets and got a basic insight into the military world... as soon as this lockdown is over I will be sure to get in touch with my local unit and perhaps try and get booked on some camps for the summer!
 
Oh you are from the Royal Navy! Thank you so much for deciding to post and giving me an insight into another branch. I know there is a forum called Navy-Net but it is great to see you on here....
Somebody tell her; somebody bloody tell her, PLEASE!
:rolleyes:
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Lol, and the paragraph that begins with "That sounds really good......". is a bit noteworthy as well..
Haha just trying to be polite. There are merits to every service of course and the British military as a whole is stronger by having an individual aviation based branch, and an amphibious branch. I know there is a lot of well-meaning banter between respective regiments and branches and i'm sure that whatever regiment i join will always hold a place in my heart as being 'the one' - i'll be sure to defend it with the strongest of loyalty ;)
 

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