Potential female joining infantry

There's a great deal of research done on bone density (and also stress hormones in hair) at Sandhurst. The Cadets receive extra rations in terms of calcium and protein to help with regards to bone density.
Yes. But will she be getting a scan to see if there has been any loss of density or other issues brought about by her earlier self-imposed malnutrition period at a critical stage in development? Probably not.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
If you are 18 now and do a degree (with a bit of UOTC obviously), then Sandhurst, then capbadge-specific training then it will be 5 years before you are posted to a unit. Noone can say what operations may or may not be on at the time. It's good to know what the current operational tempo is, but it shouldn't be a factor that influences your decision.
I am actually only 16 now but 17 in August and so I do see when you think about it long term, there will be many years before I actually am considered to go on operations. I think too, situations can arise surprisingly fast and many wouldn’t have anticipated some major conflicts occurring. I will certainly take that advice on board
 

Northerngal

Clanker
You might want to give these two elements a bit of thought.

A torn up Fido would be distressing for you but you are seeking “close combat experience”.

You need to understand that close combat leads to lots of blood and distressing casualties - human and animal.
Thank you for your advice. I certainly think I came across as a bit ignorant or perhaps a hypocrite by saying this. If I am to be honest I am the sort of person who gets more upset by animals than my fellow human. Perhaps it is due to the idea that they are all innocent and have no knowledge of what is going on in a situation. Kind of like those with severe disabilities. Whereas I consider humans to have moral decision making skills due to our superior intellect and so believe we can either be morally good or bad. We are all born innocent but some people can turn into monsters depending on their decisions. Therefore, I would have no problem engaging in combat if it was turning on someone who would have no problem killing me, and of course to help my fellow soldiers.

I also think there is a difference in my entire job as a vet revolving around these casualties and seeing these animals at their worst in terms of health, whereas in other roles working alongside them in terms of working dogs and ceremonial horses and only seeing a certain number of casualties though I must anticipate high if deployed.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
I think the time is right for you to now visit cap-badges (post covid) to get an impression of where you think you'll fit in.

Visit as many as you can, and remember its a two way street, they're looking at you to see if you're suitable; you look at them to see if you would fit in with their ethos and mentality.
Thank you. Upon reading this I emailed a few reserve units in my area and am waiting for them to get back. I’ll let you know how I get on.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
All the answers you'll ever need:
to those questions, and more besides can be found in the 55 pages of one of the best threads ever on Arrse, much of it written by young folk with recent experience of kill or get killed, Afghanistan stylee.

This is Post #001:
Ah thanks. Definitely sounds interesting... i’ll check it out .... been browsing Arrse a lot but not come across it yet.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Yes. But will she be getting a scan to see if there has been any loss of density or other issues brought about by her earlier self-imposed malnutrition period at a critical stage in development? Probably not.
Thanks for bringing up a critical concern for me. I mentioned this before but it probably got lost on here. Before I undertook any exercise regime after my weight problem many months ago I got a dexa scan done through the nhs which thankfully came back clear. It was only then that I started running and weightlifting in an attempt to keep up my bone density and build it up well as I grow. I also make sure to get enough protein and calcium in the day and whilst I don’t track macros i keep a rough eye on it after learning about nutrition and stuff like that.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Thank you for your advice. I certainly think I came across as a bit ignorant or perhaps a hypocrite by saying this. If I am to be honest I am the sort of person who gets more upset by animals than my fellow human. Perhaps it is due to the idea that they are all innocent and have no knowledge of what is going on in a situation. Kind of like those with severe disabilities. Whereas I consider humans to have moral decision making skills due to our superior intellect and so believe we can either be morally good or bad. We are all born innocent but some people can turn into monsters depending on their decisions. Therefore, I would have no problem engaging in combat if it was turning on someone who would have no problem killing me, and of course to help my fellow soldiers.

I also think there is a difference in my entire job as a vet revolving around these casualties and seeing these animals at their worst in terms of health, whereas in other roles working alongside them in terms of working dogs and ceremonial horses and only seeing a certain number of casualties though I must anticipate high if deployed.
Again, more thought required. Close combat isn’t “clean”. It isn’t just two opposing forces fighting an honest fight.

Collateral damage is something we try to avoid, but it isn’t always possible. Our opponents are often far less concerned about it than we are. People coerced into fighting - adults and children. Innocent victims. Some very tough call to make as a commander.

You have plenty of time yet. Concentrate on your studies, don’t over analyse ever single thing. Try to enjoy your youth, and revisit this when you are nearer to making some decisions. Your feelings may well have changed.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
I am also extremely glad about the announcement yesterday because it means my boxing club is starting back up. It has really helped develop my physical and mental strength and so hopefully will continue to do so for the next two years of college. I’ll definitely try to keep it up at university too though, no reason why not....

a few Questions that have just come to mind

- many of you must have been on this forum for a long time... as of yet have any women mentioned an interest in joining a combat arm on here?

- Do you think if I focus on something combat related I should also consider the Royal Marines? Potentially as an officer..

- I imagine it has toned down quite a bit since previous decades but how hard honestly is basic training and even combat capbadge specific training in terms of ‘breaking you down and building you back up’ - i imagine it is not as Full metal jacket displays it but I imagine to encourage mental resilience and determination it must be psychologically challenging. For instance lack of sleep, drills to instil discipline... to be a bit frank will the drill instructors take the mick out of the recruits in a way some would call ‘bullying’.... I am prepared to put up with that but seeing the military adverts they seem to depict it to be a lot softer...

- What would you say is or was the worst aspect of your job? So i can mentally just consider and weigh up the negatives.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Again, more thought required. Close combat isn’t “clean”. It isn’t just two opposing forces fighting an honest fight.

Collateral damage is something we try to avoid, but it isn’t always possible. Our opponents are often far less concerned about it than we are. People coerced into fighting - adults and children. Innocent victims. Some very tough call to make as a commander.

You have plenty of time yet. Concentrate on your studies, don’t over analyse ever single thing. Try to enjoy your youth, and revisit this when you are nearer to making some decisions. Your feelings may well have changed.
Extremely important point you have made. It is something I have been philosophising about and thinking about deeply. It seems now days especially there isn’t such a thing as a ‘clean’ fight with chemical weapons used, torture ect...

I imagine there would be so many tough calls as a person in charge. For instance I have heard of children being forced to carry explosives and old women being handed guns by their husbands and told to shoot on sight. I like to think I would make the right decision in the moment But sometimes maybe there truly isn’t a ‘right’ decision... you could live to regret something..

there is also the aspect of discipline... you can’t ignore an order or refuse it but what if the superior makes a decision that they later regret - and you have the burden of carrying it out...

thank you i’ve saved my login on here and can always come back to it. Currently extremely bored with lockdown but to make sure when I start college I don’t forget about this thread i’ll save it to my phone and write it down on my calendar.

i have changed a Lot in the last few years and am interested (perhaps even more than my family!) to see the sort of person I will turn out to be.. hopefully a good one.
 

CrestedViper

Swinger
Extremely important point you have made. It is something I have been philosophising about and thinking about deeply. It seems now days especially there isn’t such a thing as a ‘clean’ fight with chemical weapons used, torture ect...

I imagine there would be so many tough calls as a person in charge. For instance I have heard of children being forced to carry explosives and old women being handed guns by their husbands and told to shoot on sight. I like to think I would make the right decision in the moment But sometimes maybe there truly isn’t a ‘right’ decision... you could live to regret something..

there is also the aspect of discipline... you can’t ignore an order or refuse it but what if the superior makes a decision that they later regret - and you have the burden of carrying it out...

thank you i’ve saved my login on here and can always come back to it. Currently extremely bored with lockdown but to make sure when I start college I don’t forget about this thread i’ll save it to my phone and write it down on my calendar.

i have changed a Lot in the last few years and am interested (perhaps even more than my family!) to see the sort of person I will turn out to be.. hopefully a good one.
Hi, I am a long term female lurker of this site and thought I’d chip in here. I am currently in process to join the Army as an Officer and have recently passed AOSB. It is my very clear ambition to join the Infantry, my unit preferences will be Parachute Regiment and RIFLES. The goal being to join the Parachute Regiment. This has been clear throughout my recruitment journey.
For context and to relate; I am 23 years old. Both parents served and met in the Royal Air Force and my brother is serving in the Army. My family are hugely supportive of my application and I can hand on heart say I have not been treated as anything other than equal to my fellow candidates, regardless of gender. Thus far, my treatment has been exemplary. If you are worried about voicing Infantry aspirations to career advisors please don’t be. They are there to guide you through the process and support you.
All I will say to is keep researching and keep positive. There will be a small amount of people who will dismiss you but this is not reflective of the recruitment process at all. Don’t forget these same people will dismiss many males who wish to join the infantry!
There are relatively few people out there who willingly want to take on a job that involves living and working in often very uncomfortable situations, doing a lot of physical work and potentially being exposed to significant risk such as a Para Officer.
The British Army has struggled to fill its infantry units for years, yet in an era of a recruiting crisis, a very small group of people seem to be obsessed with the idea that people who haven’t got a dick and can’t possibly do the job and its dangerous to let them in.
As I mentioned on my board, I feel one of the great strengths of the British Armed Forces has been their willingness and adaptability to embrace changed circumstances. In fact the Army, in my limited experience, has gone out of its way to make clear to me that the same physical fitness standards for the Parachute Regiment apply now to everyone. If I meet them then
I can do the job – if not then I am not up to standard. It’s that simple.
Stay focused, ignore the haters and push through. People will support you. My gut feeling, with regards to your worry about killing in the course of your duty,is to advise you that if you consider this to be a deal-breaker, is to maybe reconsider your specific career aspirations within the Army. Drop me a PM if you want.
 
I am also extremely glad about the announcement yesterday because it means my boxing club is starting back up. It has really helped develop my physical and mental strength and so hopefully will continue to do so for the next two years of college. I’ll definitely try to keep it up at university too though, no reason why not....

a few Questions that have just come to mind

- many of you must have been on this forum for a long time... as of yet have any women mentioned an interest in joining a combat arm on here?

- Do you think if I focus on something combat related I should also consider the Royal Marines? Potentially as an officer..

- I imagine it has toned down quite a bit since previous decades but how hard honestly is basic training and even combat capbadge specific training in terms of ‘breaking you down and building you back up’ - i imagine it is not as Full metal jacket displays it but I imagine to encourage mental resilience and determination it must be psychologically challenging. For instance lack of sleep, drills to instil discipline... to be a bit frank will the drill instructors take the mick out of the recruits in a way some would call ‘bullying’.... I am prepared to put up with that but seeing the military adverts they seem to depict it to be a lot softer...

- What would you say is or was the worst aspect of your job? So i can mentally just consider and weigh up the negatives.
Re: Females in the teeth arms: not on here but out in the real world I helped train the first direct commissioned female officer into the cav. Drive, fitness and determination. We can teach the rest.
 

Bobby_Bert

Old-Salt
On 20th and 27th July the Army Officer Recruiting Team will host two events entitled ‘Army Officer – A Female Perspective’.

To express interest in either of these female perspective events or the weekly online presentations, follow the instructions on RMAS’s career page.
 
introduced me to a program called stronglifts 5x5 that i’m sure many of you know about.
It's a really good novice linear progression programme to get you into strength training. I done the Starting Strength version years ago myself as did my wife. Agreed too many women neglect barbell training for myriad physical and mental wellbeing benefits.
 

Dwarf

LE
Again, more thought required. Close combat isn’t “clean”. It isn’t just two opposing forces fighting an honest fight.

Collateral damage is something we try to avoid, but it isn’t always possible. Our opponents are often far less concerned about it than we are. People coerced into fighting - adults and children. Innocent victims. Some very tough call to make as a commander.

You have plenty of time yet. Concentrate on your studies, don’t over analyse ever single thing. Try to enjoy your youth, and revisit this when you are nearer to making some decisions. Your feelings may well have changed.
Duke has a very good point here. You stress you want to get into combat, why? It isn't like a boxing match and it's not a case of winning a few matches, it's a horrible, dirty job that sometimes has to be done.
You have to bear in mind the collateral damage as he has said and reflect on this.
Don't let this stop you joining the Army by any means but do think about what you may have to do and what it may mean to other people as well as yourself. Too many keen to get into it officers have caused unecessary deaths amongst their troops, so think about that.
Be a good soldier and if you have to go into action do your best but remember soldiers only have to do their job when politicians have failed.

Below is something posted on FB today by a friend of mine from the Battalion. Collateral damage.

Today we said goodbye to Sgt Lisa Brydon who took her own life after struggling with PTSD and depression. Lisa served with a variety of units and completed tours of Iraq and Afghanistan. The Fusiliers were joined by representatives of The Yorkshire Regiment, Royal Tank Corps, Army Air Corps, The Rifles, and The Royal Navy and Special Air Service.
Due to Covid we had to stand outside the chapel and watch the service on a mobile phone. We heard how she had touched many during her time in the army and was highly respected by all who served with her.
I have attended far too many funerals of soldiers who have reached their emotional limits and found no other way but to take their own lives. I don't believe that we know the true figures when it comes to service suicides and I don't think the government are counting. It's a national disgrace!



1594387409081.png
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Bloody hell, that’s a rarity. Any idea how long they’ve had that?

Some WIS are tested periodically as part of the ADVANCE study (DMRC Stanford Hall).
I don't know for how long. What I do know is that serious research has been going on at Sandbags for many years.

Here's an example:

 
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