Potential female joining infantry

Remember if you go to university it is worth looking at sponsorship, you will be expected to join the OTC/OTR (location dependant) but they will give you a grant per year in return for years of service and you get lay on top from the OTC/OTR work you do.

If you are keen on boxing then you can also enter army competitions via OTC/R.
 
Only you can determine the best body weight for you. the only way to get used to carrying weight is to get out there and carry weight. Get yourself a decent bergan and boots and get out the hills. It may be worth taking up the Duke of Edinburgh scheme. If you can make map reading, navigation and ground appreciation second nature it will stand you in good stead.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Thank you. I certainly am aiming for Sandhurst and think I would love to take ownership and be a leader if I can get in. It seems like RMAS makes the most of people and honestly teaches you how to become a proficient soldier and leader in so many ways.

It is hard for me to truly understand all these roles and so as soon as this lockdown is eased further I will take the opportunity to visit some army reserve units, attend recruiting events, contact the cadets and more.. it is such a shame my family have no military contacts but you guys have all helped enormously in filling me in on info.

I think i'll see how these two college years pan out and how I do in my A levels. After that i should have a better idea of what I want from life and at the moment I agree that I think I would want to go full in as a regular if I did join.
Currently Sandhurst runs at about 12% female. They come from interesting places, for example in recent years, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Colombia, Paraguay, Belgium, Germany and the Palestinian Authority. There are even some from the north of England.
 
Currently Sandhurst runs at about 12% female. They come from interesting places, for example in recent years, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Colombia, Paraguay and the Palestinian Authority. There are even some from the north of England.
And they tend to be the toughest...
 

Colonel Blimp

War Hero
So sorry everyone, amid the lockdown and my own personal experiences I entirely forgot about making this thread! I honestly am so grateful for all of your advice on here and it gave me an opportunity to think deeply about what I want from life and what I want to give to society. I didn’t actually mention a key aspect of myself in my initial post, perhaps because I was struggling mentally with it at the time and looking into the future (and a potential career) gave me some hope. At the time I made this post I never would have gotten into the military due to a medical issue. I was unintentionally severely underweight due to me being foolish and having spent a year doing a huge amount of sports but not adequately fuelling myself for all this activity. At one point I weighed 38 kilos at 5’5 and had a series of health issues such as anemia and potential organ failure. Ever since I gained the weight I actually grew an inch! I used medical support and now weigh about 50 kilos and had a blood test done and it all came back clear thankfully. The tough experiences I had forced me to mature and grow up and taught me valuable lessons. For instance I now know the importance of rest and recovery and good nutrition, as well as the importance of building strength and weightlifting as well as cardio. I always have been interested in the military and my weight issue was a huge setback that I am so grateful to have overcome in time for college in September. I will let you all know how I get on and what I pursue but first for 2 years of Biology, English lit, and History A levels! I look forward to the future.
Please keep us informed. Given what you've just told us, the infantry is not the place for you. It's very much a team game and you don't want to stand out in the way that you've told us. Intelligence is a good fit, but only you know what you can and cannot do.

38 kg, huh? I probably could have stuffed you in my bergen back in the day.
 
One question before I forget :-D fitness wise should I focus on my running or weightlifting or pay equal attention to both. Hopefully boxing training will start up soon but in the meantime I have been using an app and doing roadwork. Starting off with 5k and running 4 days a week and gradually increasing the distance. I am now up to 7k however a few months ago did no running whatsoever except for 10-20 mins of hill sprints at boxing. What would be a good running schedule? Also with the stronglifts I am training 3 times a week in the major compound exercises. So far after a couple of weeks starting With the empty bar I am at squat - 40kg, bench press 25kg, overhead press 25kg, deadlift 50 kg , barbell row 30kg however have not struggled yet as the weight is increasing. My boxing coach says I should continue to bulk up a bit from 50 kilos and aim for 51 as an initial target. For joining the military in a potential combat role I am aware more mass would help tremendously for rucking/lifting heavy equipment and so what do you reckon I should aim for in terms of weight?
As a lady you will want to be paying attention to both. Weight bearing, whilst paying attention to getting enough of the proper minerals, will be key to building the bone density you will need to survive successfully.
 
One of the major attractions for me about the infantry is of course the lifestyle. I would hate to have a 9-5 job sitting at a desk and the infantry seems like it would provide the mental and physical challenges i seek and desire. Everyday is a new task and you are doing something different. I also want to see as much combat as possible and be deployed frequently and I feel that the infantry regiments would be best in terms of this.
I've been out of the Army since 2003, but served 30 years, and was infantry (commissioned officer since age 19 in 1974).

Be careful about your assumptions of what deployed life is like. Somebody a long time ago wrote that soldiering mostly comprises long periods of utter boredom, punctuated by moments of abject terror (or words very similar).

It isn't a life for everybody, and in barracks it was an exceptional battalion that managed to beat the mundane into submission in favour of exciting innovative training. I doubt that has changed much, and I dunno how often these days you might expect an operational tour. Iraq and Afghanistan seem to have quenched the enthusiasm for expeditionary ops that erupted when the Soviet Union collapsed.

Good on you though

Just be careful what you wish for.
 
1. If you can, go to RMAS. Downside - after Pl Comd, strap yourself in to your desk until Coy Comd.
There is a lot of desk time after platoon command at every level...

2. Totally disagree about CMT. It has nothing at all to do with the Infantry.
She is already has medico tendencies. Have you been infantry, or a medic? We Grunts love our embedded Docs and take care of them as much as they take care of us. Why do you think I would have steered her toward 16?

3. Couldn't disagree more about joining the Reserves. The girl wants the full time adventure of joining the Infantry. Being a TA Medic is the polar opposite of that. I've said it on other threads, but entering a glacial recruiting system to spend 2+ years to reach trained soldier standard is not a good recruiting tool for someone who is considering the Regular Army.
She obviously needs a ramp up to standard. Again, different jobs, but Grunts and Docs belong together. And her wish for adventure is again why I steered her toward the reserve Airborne medical units. Best chance for her to ease in, and get stuck in with the grunts, whilst growing into a combat oriented job, with less chance of damaging herself.
 

Dwarf

LE
Ah thank you so much for the advice Dwarf. In terms of weight I was actually meaning my bodyweight since I know there is no weight limit for women in the army but a heavier bodyweight might help with strength aspects. But at the same time I don't want to compromise my fitness and good cardio by packing on the fat. :mrgreen:. Initially I had to gain weight pretty fast for my health and was gaining about 0.7 kilos a week, even a kilo some weeks, but now i'm at an average bmi I'm just wondering should I aim for a higher weight than 50 kilos and try to get some more muscle mass. Unfortunately since i lost all that weight so quick i also lost lots of strength and muscle as it was the first to go.

I will definitely prioritise running and focus on my next goal - a 10k without stopping! I'll do some sprints, long recovery runs, fartlek ect ... to try to vary it up as you said.
Thank you. I agree and that was huge concern for me. What weight do you think is the most I could push it on a 5'5 frame and not end up overweight? I think slowly and steadily focusing on muscle gain is the ticket but it would be great to have an end goal in sight.
I am a Cold War Warrior, there are people on here that are far more up to date on standards and training than I am. But if you will take a bit of gentle advice from a teacher who has worked with all ages since I stopped carrying a rifle 33 years ago then there is one thing that stands out in all your posts. Your obsession with targets and numbers and weights. Possibly this comes from talking to your uncles who are weight lifters, which is fine for them but not an army orientated fitness regime.
You were down to 38 kilos at one point which tells me you were obsessing about hitting targets and not about general health and fitness. (I'm your height and after my first marathon I weighed myself at 56 kilos, -then I had breakfast- but that's a full 18 kilo difference between you and me.)

You have an end goal, - getting into the Army, which you won't if you preoccupy yourself with numbers and details and ignore the most important details of being fit AND healthy. Obsession is bad for mental health.
The Army doesn't care if you lift a kilo more or less and neither should you. Concentrate on army orientated training, running, walking like @dingerr suggested, with weights as an adjunct. Carry on boxing by all means.
But above all stop obsessing about it all and how many kilos this or that. Like your last question about how many kilos could you stick on a 5' 5" frame which actually can't be answered precisely with an exact number which is what you appear to want. The modern Infantryman's basic load is 35 kilos, plus what you put in your bergen which is partly up to you. Some carry more some less and it's often a case of mind over matter.* Look at photos of the lads in the Falklands, massive bergens, they were all carrying around 60kg and height didn't matter.
I carried the heaviest bergen in the Platoon because if the shortarse boss can do it they had to keep up, it's more mental effort than physical.
When it's cold, pissing down, you haven't eaten for a while, the Rambos fold, the racing snakes keep on going.

Remember you have to pass the BFT (or modern equivalent,) CFT, and get yourself over assault courses not win weight-lifting competitions. Design your training round that, enjoy your training and go in the right direction. Results, not numbers.

Good luck and relax more about it, you aren't in a hurry or you shouldn't be, you'll get there.

* When the Sergeant loads you up with even more stuff to carry, he doesn't mind and your opinion doesn't matter.
 
Thank you. I agree and that was huge concern for me. What weight do you think is the most I could push it on a 5'5 frame and not end up overweight? I think slowly and steadily focusing on muscle gain is the ticket but it would be great to have an end goal in sight.
I'm not a doctor, a nutritionist or a physio, so I'm the wrong person to ask. As a layman, all I can say is that 25kg for 8 miles in 2 hrs is a very different prospect to a 6' tall, 90kg person than it is to someone 40kg lighter. You can be as fit as you like, but a smaller person will find it harder to move with the same weight as a larger person. It's just physics.

I also note that a female recently passed P Coy, and she wasn't exactly a monster. She was, however, ridiculously fit and determined.

I suppose the only way to find out is to try it and see what happens. As others have said, University and UOTC?
 
The modern Infantryman's basic load is 35 kilos, plus what you put in your bergen which is partly up to you.
News to me.

44kg, from memory, basic combat load in your webbing with weapon (circa 1991), then the body armour (INIBA - ergonomic NOT and certainly in excess of 10kg) then the Bergan. With batteries for comms, night sights and EW countermeasures, spare ammo (it was S Armagh, after all) water and rations (for 2 to 3 days).

That was before you got to loading the bivvi kit and dossbag. Then, if you could be arrsed, you might pack a few personal preferences (I dunno - a jetboil mebbe).

I felt like a combat donkey, or a tooled up snail, moving very slowly, with my house on my back.

Plenty evidence on these boards that every time you lighten an item of the infantryman's combat load, somebody finds a new bit of kit the grunt can't do without beyond the perimeter wire of his op base .
 

Dwarf

LE
News to me.

44kg, from memory, basic combat load in your webbing with weapon (circa 1991), then the body armour (INIBA - ergonomic NOT and certainly in excess of 10kg) then the Bergan. With batteries for comms, night sights and EW countermeasures, spare ammo (it was S Armagh, after all) water and rations (for 2 to 3 days).

That was before you got to loading the bivvi kit and dossbag. Then, if you could be arrsed, you might pack a few personal preferences (I dunno - a jetboil mebbe).

I felt like a combat donkey, or a tooled up snail, moving very slowly, with my house on my back.

Plenty evidence on these boards that every time you lighten an item of the infantryman's combat load, somebody finds a new bit of kit the grunt can't do without beyond the perimeter wire of his op base .
I quoted from these pages, so it's either someone got it wrong or my memory is slightly deficient. The joys of being in your 60's

Anyway bloody heavy whatever we carried, but then it hasn't changed since before Roman times and the Roman Infantrymen called themselves Marius' Mules.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
Giving a modern slant with weight carried, Body armour with helmet is around 20kgs, by the time you added weapon, 6 Mags and water you are getting near the 35kg mark. Then you need to put on the kit for your task. In my team I carried 60-65Kg all up and that was the lightest load, I’d still get pissed off though if the loady didn’t put the ramp down on the chinook.
 

Colonel Blimp

War Hero
As a lady you will want to be paying attention to both. Weight bearing, whilst paying attention to getting enough of the proper minerals, will be key to building the bone density you will need to survive successfully.
And she doesn't just want to survive, but thrive. I don't happen to agree with having women in the infantry, but this lady has grit. The trouble with being a trailblazer, or on point in this instance; is that he, or she, is likely to be taken out first.
 
And she doesn't just want to survive, but thrive. I don't happen to agree with having women in the infantry, but this lady has grit. The trouble with being a trailblazer, or on point in this instance; is that he, or she, is likely to be taken out first.
At this point due to her updates, it should be pointed out that self-induced malnutrition during a critical period of physical development is not exactly conducive to producing the requisite bone density to survive the parade square undamaged, let alone heavily laden forced marches.

The best way forward would definitely be the slow build-up.
 
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And she doesn't just want to survive, but thrive. I don't happen to agree with having women in the infantry, but this lady has grit. The trouble with being a trailblazer, or on point in this instance; is that he, or she, is likely to be taken out first.
Haven't the Canadians and New Zealanders allowed females to join the Infantry since about 2001, although I don't think they had many joining or transfering across. Although there appears to be quite a few in the Canadian Militia and New Zealand TF.
 

Northerngal

Clanker
Remember if you go to university it is worth looking at sponsorship, you will be expected to join the OTC/OTR (location dependant) but they will give you a grant per year in return for years of service and you get lay on top from the OTC/OTR work you do.

If you are keen on boxing then you can also enter army competitions via OTC/R.
thank you. I think that would definitely be a good option to experience the military and earn a bit of money as a student. I’ll do some more research into it and i’m sure college might be useful for contacts. Like i mentioned previously my old school was very anti-military and didn’t offer much but this new college is so diverse and more free-thinking in terms of careers.
 

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