Potential Cavalry Officer

#1
Hello everyone,

I’m a 23 year old graduate and have started to think seriously about trying to join as a regular officer. I come from a very army family, my father served for nearly 40 years and I was at a military school (DoYRMS). Although I don’t think I’m the usual army ‘type’ a lot of people I know seem to think that I’d be a fool not to give it a go, so I’m starting to look into it.

Initially I've been thinking about the Household Div, the KRH (my local cavalry) and the Scots Dragoon Guards. I feel I'd get on in a regiment with a very traditional ethos and I hear the cavalry are still like that, and I always enjoyed the ceremonial side of the army. However, I don't really have any links with any of these regiments and I'm just wondering where I should go from here.

It's still very early days, any advice or recommendations would be appreciated.
 
#2
I feel I'd get on in a regiment with a very traditional ethos and I hear the cavalry are still like that,
'Traditional ethos' - Translates to: Out-of-touch Pompous arse's living in an era 150 yrs ago, with ridiculous rules, sayings and habits

. . . and I always enjoyed the ceremonial side of the army.
That's nice. However, best not to forget the 99% of the time doing real work, looking after the guys (a chunk of whom are admin nightmares), personal development and sucking up to the Adj, OC & CO.
 
#3
Okay, okay, I realise what I originally posted makes me sound like a twat. My father joined up at 17 and retired last year at 55 as a Lt. Col. the reason I don't think of myself as the army 'type' is because I'm not like my dad or his mates and as some people here have noticed I can sometimes sound like a pompous arse. All this put me off thinking about the army before but recently people (including my dad) have been saying it might be a good thing for me to consider.

The reason I started this thread is because I know these regiments have/had a reputation for being snobby about who can join them and also its a world away from my own experience.
 
#4
Okay, okay, I realise what I originally posted makes me sound like a twat. My father joined up at 17 and retired last year at 55 as a Lt. Col. the reason I don't think of myself as the army 'type' is because I'm not like my dad or his mates and as some people here have noticed I can sometimes sound like a pompous arse. All this put me off thinking about the army before but recently people (including my dad) have been saying it might be a good thing for me to consider.

The reason I started this thread is because I know these regiments have/had a reputation for being snobby about who can join them and also its a world away from my own experience.
Playing nicely for a minute, assuming your dad is a Lt Col (whether or not LE) then I suggest that he's either going to have that sort of information in his head, or know someone who does.

Him and a ring round of his mates/connections, or randoms off teh interwebz? Your call. If it was me I'd have a serious chat with Dad. That's a "link" that the average bloke in the street hasn't got when they start their thinking process on unit.
 

Medic_Cop22

On ROPS
On ROPs
#5
I'm with @kinross_special. You should never feel guilty about using connections when it comes to your career.

Nothing will ever be more helpful in your job search than the people you know.

The connections you’ve made and the relationships you’ve formed are often your best resource for finding your way in to a new job.

What appeals to you about a career as an officer?
 
#6
Okay, okay, I realise what I originally posted makes me sound like a twat. My father joined up at 17 and retired last year at 55 as a Lt. Col. the reason I don't think of myself as the army 'type' is because I'm not like my dad or his mates and as some people here have noticed I can sometimes sound like a pompous arse. All this put me off thinking about the army before but recently people (including my dad) have been saying it might be a good thing for me to consider.

The reason I started this thread is because I know these regiments have/had a reputation for being snobby about who can join them and also its a world away from my own experience.
Maybe, and I know I'm going to sound craaaaaaaaaazy, ask your Dad. Who knows more about the army than a 40 year Lt Col AND will not bluff you or try to coerce you.......?
 
#7
Action plan:
Talk to your dad - and having gone to The Duke of Yorks which is a military school you should have all the connections you need to answer the questions.
Did you not join the OTC, if so follow your connections and talk to the permanent staff.
Get regimental visits set up and see what the Regiments are like that you are interested in, remember it's the young officers you will need to get on with as you could be sharing a barracks with them for years.
You don't need us, you have more than enough connections - just ask them!
 
#8
I'm with @kinross_special. You should never feel guilty about using connections when it comes to your career.

Nothing will ever be more helpful in your job search than the people you know.

The connections you’ve made and the relationships you’ve formed are often your best resource for finding your way in to a new job.

What appeals to you about a career as an officer?
I can see that army is a good way of life and a very fulfilling job. I'd say I have a high sense of self sacrifice and a willingness to be at the service of others and the army seems to offer this where a 'normal' job wouldn't. I know a lot of it can just be sitting at a computer doing admin, but it seems like that would be more fun in a regiment than an insurance office.

What I've been told is that there's no harm in trying and if I were lucky enough to get a commission I'd be kicked out in 6 years if I were awful or hated it but hopefully knowing a lot more about myself
 

Caecilius

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#9
If this isn't a wind up then PM me for some cavalry-specific advice about units.
 
#10
Hello everyone,

I’m a 23 year old graduate and have started to think seriously about trying to join as a regular officer. I come from a very army family, my father served for nearly 40 years and I was at a military school (DoYRMS). Although I don’t think I’m the usual army ‘type’ a lot of people I know seem to think that I’d be a fool not to give it a go, so I’m starting to look into it.

Initially I've been thinking about the Household Div, the KRH (my local cavalry) and the Scots Dragoon Guards. I feel I'd get on in a regiment with a very traditional ethos and I hear the cavalry are still like that, and I always enjoyed the ceremonial side of the army. However, I don't really have any links with any of these regiments and I'm just wondering where I should go from here.

It's still very early days, any advice or recommendations would be appreciated.
I went to the same school as you, but I'm of your father's generation.

Things have changed in many ways but I expect that you may still have to be sponsored by a regiment to start the officer selection process: certainly in my day all of the higher-end capbadges liked to at least be involved in the process, although formal allocation to regiments/corps didn't happen until about half way through my course. You probably need to be talking to the regiment of your choice asap. The unaffiliated end up being shuffled off into the jobs nobody else wants (insert name of usual suspects here).

Three things about your background that might be worth reflecting on:

1. You made no mention of having been to an OTC. You are bound to be asked about this.

2. Unless you are from a moneyed family (which I doubt otherwise you'd have probably gone to another school) then - although this may well have mellowed over the years - the more fashionable regiments can be difficult places for a young officer. It was common in my day for a subaltern's mess bill* to be greater than his salary. If you don't have a private income you won't survive under such circumstances. I understand some effort's gone into making this situation more egalitarian but old habits die hard. If everyone else's family own half a county it will be difficult to fit in. Polo, anyone?

3. Finally, IF you DO make it to Sandhurst, it's a hard course, and it's not a certainty you will pass. My time at DYRMS (no 'o' in those days) helped me with the basics: I knew how to make bed blocks, bull boots and march, and I already had a basic grounding in map reading. I knew how to shoot (albeit with a different rifle) and knew basic radio voice procedures. Now, all this was a big help to me personally in the first few weeks but it does NOT give you bragging rights. I tell you now, that if it sounds like you're mouthing off in a know-it-all fashion it will go very badly for you. Bear in mind that some 10% of your course will be commissioned from the ranks. Many of them will be wearing various bits of tin on parade and THEY are the ones who will have some idea about what is going on. Better for you by far to be the grey man, if you get there.

* a monthly 'bar' bill and other additional charges for things like housekeeping and additional food beyond that supplied by the normal catering system.
 
#11
@twentyfirstoffoot Ouch!

@Tietjens - There's a kernel of good advice in his post, though. In terms of type of officer and unit culture the distinction between the RTR and Cavalry is far smaller than you might imagine. They're also in tanks, which is a better role than Light Cavalry, which many Cav regiments have found themselves in.

You have much more sound opinion to hand than you think. Your Dad will be flattered to be asked and have more knowledge and contacts than you think such a hairy outdated old fart could possibly have accumulated.

Good luck.
 
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Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
#12
I can see that army is a good way of life and a very fulfilling job. I'd say I have a high sense of self sacrifice and a willingness to be at the service of others and the army seems to offer this where a 'normal' job wouldn't. I know a lot of it can just be sitting at a computer doing admin, but it seems like that would be more fun in a regiment than an insurance office.

What I've been told is that there's no harm in trying and if I were lucky enough to get a commission I'd be kicked out in 6 years if I were awful or hated it but hopefully knowing a lot more about myself

You are quite right that there is no harm in trying. Good luck.

'Commissioned from Sandhurst' does have significance.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#13
MOD comment - a reminder to the “comedians”. The recruiting boards are tightly moderated. If your post has been removed, you got it wrong. Do it again and you get to take a break.
 

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