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Post Work Out Blues

#1
Since a couple of months after particularly intense, prolonged bouts of exercise and exertion, I've noticed that I feel a bit low for a week or so and then I pick myself up again. It's enough that work and home notice.

I'm pretty sure it's the exercise as there is no other source of the feeling of being low and knackered.

Whats the solution? Better nutrition? Better way of doing fiz and rest?
 
#3
I found that vitamin d tablets had some effect on reducing some of the symptoms of exhaustion. Might be worth investigating further.
 
#4
I found that vitamin d tablets had some effect on reducing some of the symptoms of exhaustion. Might be worth investigating further.
The doc told my Mrs to take 5000 IU vitamin D3 tablets a few weeks ago to get back some of that get up and go that got up and fceked off.

Edit to add: Just as an FYI to consider:

The owner of a tactical kit company I met recently is in his early 50's, still looks fit'ish. His 32 year old girlfriend is in the police and has the look of a triathlete about her, fit, in both respects - why she is hanging around with a millionaire I have no idea. He say's to me, "Effendi, the best thing I've had done recently is to get testosterone supplement implanted - if I did'nt she'd **** me to death".

He showed me the implant area, just around near the kidney, they slip a needle in with the testosterone tab's and slide them under the skin where they increase your testosterone for around 6 months. He reckoned his had gone up by about 500% back to the level of a rampant 18 year old. Cost about 500 quid.
 
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#6
Since a couple of months after particularly intense, prolonged bouts of exercise and exertion, I've noticed that I feel a bit low for a week or so and then I pick myself up again. It's enough that work and home notice.
Intense and prolonged bouts of endurance will play up your hormones; cortisol in particular, which is a stress hormone.

I suspect that's what's happening here.

What's your training aims? Is it really necessary to do 'particularly intense and prolonged bouts of exercise'? If done too regularly that will lead to burn-out, depression and injury.
 
#7
Intense and prolonged bouts of endurance will play up your hormones; cortisol in particular, which is a stress hormone.

I suspect that's what's happening here.

What's your training aims? Is it really necessary to do 'particularly intense and prolonged bouts of exercise'? If done too regularly that will lead to burn-out, depression and injury.
I trained for and had a fight. I really increased the amount of training to get fit enough, continued training hard after the fight and then burned out, felt low and got injured.

Any way to avoid that cortisol business?
 
#9
I trained for and had a fight. I really increased the amount of training to get fit enough, continued training hard after the fight and then burned out, felt low and got injured.

Any way to avoid that cortisol business?
Train a bit more sensibly, really. Stress and rest. There's nothing wrong with training mega hard, as long as you rest after. Don't do back-to-back hard days. Have a complete rest day at least once-a-week.

Listen to your body (though I know that's confusing at times). That means taking it easy when it feels tired, but it also means thrashing yourself when you're feeling great. Don't be OCD with your training.

And no-more than 20 percent of your training should be intense (probably about 5 to 10 percent); the rest should be easy to moderate.
 
#11
"Effendi, the best thing I've had done recently is to get testosterone supplement implanted - if I did'nt she'd **** me to death".
I'm fairly sure there's some negative side-effects to getting testosterone implants.

One healthy way to increase -naturally - is by heavy lifting with your legs; squats and deadlifts kind of thing.

I think regular wanking helps with it too.
 
#13
I'm fairly sure there's some negative side-effects to getting testosterone implants.

One healthy way to increase -naturally - is by heavy lifting with your legs; squats and deadlifts kind of thing.

I think regular wanking helps with it too.
I had a read up on it after he told me. Hairy palms, bad attitude, man tits, increased probability of a heart attack.........all sorts of negatives.

................but, if you'd seen his girlfriend. She is around 6'1", lumps in all the right places and a serious looker to go with it.................I can understand why he is committing slow suicide.

Seriously, this testosterone thing is not all negative you just have to monitor it carefully, take the right supplements and make sure you do not get carried away with the stuff. Along with boob jobs and hormone replacement for wimmin the testosterone for men is apparently a big thing here. Doctors here advertise their specialist services and I had a card through recently for a local clinic specialising in T for men and H for wimmin.

Southlake Testosterone Doctors, Testosterone Injections & HGH Clinics | Low T Treatment | Male Hormone Therapy, Anti-Aging Clinics in TX

Low T Therapy | LT Men’s Clinic in Colleyville and Fort Worth, Serving Arlington, Bedford, Coppell, Euless, Grapevine, Haslet, Hurst, Keller, North Richland Hills, Southlake, Watauga, and Westlake

Low vs. Normal Testosterone Levels | BodyLogicMD
 
#14
I've a mate from the gym who suffers with low testosterone due to steroid abuse from when he was younger (quite common apparently). Proper low testosterone, not naturally declining t-levels due to age.

It caused him all kinds of problems (like depression), but he didn't want the testosterone supplements either because that also came with a set of long term problems.

It seemed he was in between a rock and a hard place.
 

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