Post Traumatic Growth

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by napier, Jul 16, 2013.

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  1. napier

    napier LE Moderator Reviewer

    Just to clarify, this is not about getting a chubby on while watching 2 Girls 1 Cup. I'm interested in who feels they have benefited from any traumatic events they have experienced.

    From this article Stephen Joseph: What Doesn't Kill Us: Post-traumatic Growth

    Post-traumatic growth refers to how adversity can often be a springboard to a new and more meaningful life in which people re-evaluate their priorities, deepen their relationships, and find new understandings of who they are. Post-traumatic growth is not simply about coping; it refers to changes that cut to the very core of our way of being in the world. Post-traumatic growth has to do with the way we greet the day as we wake in the morning. The way we brush our teeth and put on our shoes -- it reflects our attitude about life itself and our place in the world.

    Scientific studies have shown that post-traumatic growth is common in survivors not only of life-threatening illnesses but also other various traumatic events, including disasters, accidents, and violence. Typically 30-70 percent of survivors say that they have experienced positive changes of one form or another.

    Post-traumatic growth is an important topic because it is changing how we think about trauma and how to treat it. It challenges the traditional psychiatric view of trauma and moves us away from only looking at its destructive effects to understand that it is in the struggle with suffering that growth may arise.
  2. Brotherton Lad

    Brotherton Lad LE Reviewer

    I'd say there's a lot of sense in that.
  3. I can wholeheartedly agree with the theory. I was diagnosed nearly 5 years ago approx with PTSD 20 years after leaving. In that 20 years I screwed up two very good relationships, my 'issues' I can say were the main reason things went sour especially my second long term relationship.

    Getting help & being able to sort myself out has benefited me in every way. I am more rounded & a much better person because of what I went through over the water. Not because of the treatment i received because in real terms I received very little as I decided to tackle things without any medical help.

    I am now happier than I have ever been, soon to be married for a second time & settled in every way. I have said to my girlfriend I would go through it all again to be where I am now. She is a huge part of that attitude but I was a better & more complete person before we met.
  4. There's an interesting book titled 'The Gift of Fear' by Gavin de Becker which touches on these inner survival mechanisms, worth a read if you enjoy learning about our inner thought processes and so forth. It does get a bit chewy at times but stick with it, and you'll learn a few things about yourself.

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  5. I am a Yank Ex-HueyCobra pilot in Viet Nam. I've been asked to prepare a program on Military Post Traumatic Growth [PTG] for presentation to about 200 Military Behavioral Health professionals, in Washington, D.C. on the 20th of February.

    I hope to include some examples of PTG in Allied Forces.

    I would appreciate hearing from anyone willing to add their stories of PTG following combat.