Possible to get Para fit in 6 months?

I was wondering if it is possible to get fit enough to pass p coy within 6 months and what sort of training program you guys would suggest to achieve this

Thanks
 
Possible. Get a lot of scaled road work in on different terrain, go heavy on core strength and medium on upper body to get prepped. The core stuff will help with the battering and breathing, your upper body (if developed at early stage) will build throughout the course.
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
I was wondering if it is possible to get fit enough to pass p coy within 6 months and what sort of training program you guys would suggest to achieve this

Thanks

Yes.

That's what they do at Para depot, isn't it? Therefore I suggest going to para depot and doing their training programme.

(More) serious answer - there is no answer because it depends on how much work you have to do and how much time you can devote to doing it - and how hard you work in that time.

Possible? Probably, but it'd be a monster of a job to do it on your own while you're working/have family commitments etc - especially as you don't know what you're up against.

Bags of strength, bags of speed and bags of endurance. Be a big lump of training.
 

Drivers_lag

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How often should I be doing cardio?

Strength isn't a problem as been bodybuilding for just over a year.
Thanks for the reply

Strength is a problem because bodybuilding's no use to you with army type phys. You need endurance, not bodybuilding type strength.

There's no reason you can't do cardio 6 times a week.
 

Drivers_lag

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Any strength is good strength ;)
Would recovery not be a problem doing it 6 times a week?

Depends what you're doing, doesn't it?

@Brotherton Lad will probably be along shortly to tell you to do a hard day, then an easy day with the running. Probably some advice about mixing up speedwork with hills and endurance. There's a whole thread on speeding up your running - 1.5 miler something or other. Search for it.

Why are you asking about passing P coy, anyway? Let depot para worry about that - you just worry about getting fit enough to get there.

And no, you can circuit train and do Britmilfit and such 6 times a week quite comfortably, though I'd suggest mixing it up and doing something different each day.
 
I just want to make sure I don't have to worry about fitness, then I can focus more on other more important skills.

Thanks a lot for the help guys
 
I just want to make sure I don't have to worry about fitness, then I can focus more on other more important skills.

Thanks a lot for the help guys
Worry about fitness a lot. You'll consume somewhere around 5-7k calories a day and still lose weight. These chaps (I'm not one) have it double hard on phys.
 
Currently at around 11 minute 1.5 mile, it's not the best but I've not long started cardio. Reason for the 6 months is down to current personal circumstances, I want to get in ASAP.

Mostly struggle with endurance. (Que the jokes)
 

Drivers_lag

On ROPS
On ROPs
I just want to make sure I don't have to worry about fitness, then I can focus more on other more important skills.

Thanks a lot for the help guys

Wot @Peli23 said.

You'll never be so fit that you'll be fit enough. If it was me, I'd run like feck until my mile and a half was sub 9 minutes and I had some respectable endurance, then keep on top of the running, but smash out a ton of Britmilfit and circuit training or crossfit as well.
 
Wot @Peli23 said.

You'll never be so fit that you'll be fit enough. If it was me, I'd run like feck until my mile and a half was sub 9 minutes and I had some respectable endurance, then keep on top of the running, but smash out a ton of Britmilfit and circuit training or crossfit as well.
I'd go further. My old training partner was ex 2 and did the mile and a half in 7.43. He wasn't a muscled weight trainer and only about 5ft5. What he had was mental fortitude AND phys ability. He beasted himself on pebble runs with a rucksack of wet sand in summer and smashed the hills in winter. Well fit and got mentally tough doing it. More commitment than any guy I've met and that's what it takes, I guess, to get a lid.
 

Drivers_lag

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That's great, cheers.

I didn't mean it like that, I simply meant so I am better prepared

Para requirement is I think, 09:30 minimum start standard.

That is a minimum - don't get too hung up on it, smash it. And remember - running fitness is not general fitness.
 
Currently at around 11 minute 1.5 mile, it's not the best but I've not long started cardio. Reason for the 6 months is down to current personal circumstances, I want to get in ASAP.

Mostly struggle with endurance. (Que the jokes)
You need more than that China. I did about 8.45 in prime and it wouldn't be good enough because I did it unladen and on tarmac without the right commitment. Had a family so brain was elsewhere. It's the mind set you need, not necessarily the strength although that's a big part too.
 

Wired Bandit

Old-Salt
I was wondering if it is possible to get fit enough to pass p coy within 6 months and what sort of training program you guys would suggest to achieve this

Thanks

Doing it in your own time would be tough but do able, are we talking just fit enough to scrape a pass on pcoy? Or a good strong pass? If you're starting at depot then they will get you fit enough. But if you're training in your own time have a look at the para fitness guide by major mcgrath.



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Sarastro

LE
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Depending on your initial level of fitness, and if you're doing an 11 min PFT you aren't horrendously bad, you can. It largely depends on effort and determination, which is also largely what will get you through depot. Having recently had some good, effective advice on similar training from an ex-international athlete, I'd suggest:

Break your training into three parts. Speed, Core, Endurance. Don't aim to do everything immediately, plan a gradated program of gradual improvement over six months. Whether you do all three parts every week, or break it down into phases (i.e. 2 months speed, 2 months core, 2 months endurance) is a matter of debate. For what you're training for, I'd suggest doing all three every week is simpler and reflects what you'll actually have to do in depot.

If you haven't done much endurance, for the first three months start out doing 5 days a week, with two rest days. Initially do 2 days : rest : 3 days : rest. Then do 5 days : rest : rest. For the last three months, move to 6 days a week, with one rest day. Take a "recovery week" in the middle of the last three months, were you only do 4 sessions over that week, and only do "Active Recovery" or Slow sessions. Ensure that your pattern of training is:

Day 1 Hard session (i.e. sprints, circuits, or a 2 session day)
Day 2 Slow session / "Active recovery" session (i.e. long slow run, or low-heartrate session working different muscles to previous day
Day 3 Hard session(s)
Day 4 Active Recovery session
etc

If you try to go Hard every day, everything will simply default to "medium" and you will not improve. Make sure there is a noticeable difference between Hard and Slow days.

Speed. Your aim is an 8:30 PFT in 6 months time. This is to give you a safety margin, because people find the Para PFT course in Catterick can be a bit ninja. Google Tabata sprints, and start working those into your program (10 x 1 minute sprints, 1 minute rest between). Google fartlek and interval training, and work out sessions of those ranging between 1.5-3 miles for the first 3 months. For the second 3 months, you want to be doing between 3-5 miles fartlek / interval. Do one test PFT every three weeks, the first session after a rest day. Use your results on these test PFTs to adjust your training according to what has been working.

If you can fit it in, a lot of people recommend Olympic powerlifting to increase burst speed, because it works those quick twitch fibres that you need for power sprints (or section attacks, hill sprints, etc).

Core. Your aim is to comfortably do the 60-odd pressups / situps required, and to build up core strength for tabbing and weight carrying. For the first three months, do mixed strength circuits, at least 45 mins each time, aiming to do a range of exercises for a set time. For example: 12 exercises, 1 x min each, 3 mins rest. Repeat 3 times. Google Pilates exercises and Yoga (find an athlete's version of yoga like P90X, not a yummy mummy one), and work these into your program: Pilates for abdominal/core work, Yoga for recovery days.

For the second three months, keep up the circuits, but do for at least 60mins, and they should be working your cardiovascular system hard as well. Start building up sets of pressups and situps (30 x 4 a day, then 40 x 4, etc). Work isometric (holding a static stress position) Pilates exercises into your sessions every day, even if for only 10 minutes at start. Start doing one leg overload circuit a week - an hour of constant weighted squats, weighted lunges, stepups and so on. Your leg muscle groups are big, and can take a lot more than anyone thinks. The first session will seem insane, and you will have trouble walking the next day, but these sessions will provide very quick results and massively improve your hill and tabbing ability.

Endurance. Your aim is to comfortably run 10k in under 48 minutes. For the first three months, start with two endurance runs a week. One building up from 3 to 5 miles (over the three months) where you work up to maintaining an 8 min mile pace. The second where you build up from 40 minutes to 60 minutes (over the three months) at a recovery pace: i.e. HR between 60-70%, no more. This can be a shuffle, the point is do the full time and don't walk. For the last three months, your first run will be 10k between 7-8 min miles pace. Your second run will be 75-90 minutes at a recovery pace as before.

Additionally, for the last three months only, you can start working on walking fast with weight. Once a week, start with 8kg in a backpack, and aim for 12 minute miles (this will mean you have to alternate between walking and a shuffle run) over 60 minutes. Increase the weight by 1kg a week until you get to 15kg maximum. Over the same time period, gradually increase the pace until you do 10 minute miles. If you can do 10 minute miles with 15kg for 60 minutes, you will be in a good position to start depot. NOTE: The official advice is always not to run with weight before starting training. Take it or leave it. Frankly, I'd suggest this is risk averse and counterproductive. Carrying weight is all about gradual conditioning. The important factor is you must build up slowly and be aware of injury: STOP if you feel immediate or chronic pain from training with weight. But, if you do what I outline above (which is essentially a longer, lighter version of the Army program of training with weight), you will gradually build up your body's capacity to run with weight, so when you reach depot it will be less of a shock to the system, therefore you will be less likely to get injured. If you get eager and do too much too soon, you can injure yourself. What I outline here is designed to give you an extra 6 months conditioning to reduce the chance of injury in depot, not to turn you into a Para Reg tabbing machine from the day you start at Catterick.

Aside from that, understand that everyone has bad days. Don't beat yourself up about it, focus on the next session, and keep working.
 
Last edited:

ERFPO

Old-Salt
Go to your local drink 2 pints then take on the whole pub declaring you are the hardest guy on the planet.
If you survive the kicking(s)
Then your ready.
 
Go to your local drink 2 pints then take on the whole pub declaring you are the hardest guy on the planet.
If you survive the kicking(s)
Then your ready.
Make sure the pub is in Devonport and full of Booties.
 

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