Possible new biker - advice please!

AFA06

LE
You don't mention the chrome!
Very little chrome on it except for the wheels and they will hopefully be black soon - but I know what you mean!
 
The Honda Dullsville would get my vote too for your proposed use. Has the benefit of built in panniers to carry some of your gear in - useful if the bike is a substitute for a car rather than a weekend toy.
 

armr617

War Hero
The dullsville is an odd duck.
I have ridden most types of bikes from supersports to uber trail type, last year i was told i was going to be commuting warminster- fleet so i decided to get a dullsville after a test ride.

Its quick enough on the m'way (cruises happily around 80) although wind blast is a bit noisy for me, back roads to work are a bit of a giggle, although not as grippy as my old gixer. Gets around 220miles to a tank which costs around £21 to fill at the moment.
Shaft drive is seeemples for maint, the panniers will just about take the issue NI daysack with nowt in the side pouches.

As to it attracting sensible riders, jury is out at the moment, i ride mine like a cnut at times!
 
Welcome to the club Alfred

If you were just sticking to the 19 mile commute, a smaller engined bike would be fine or even better a 400cc scooter....very comfy and economical.

With the 190 mile run, you would be wanting something along the lines of a 650cc bike, that distance would be a balls ache on a small bike and it wouldn,t do the bike much good either.

Most bikes come in 2 flavours N is unfaired and normally more upright riding position ( comfy )

S is the sportier of the type, normally half/full faired and slightly sporty riding poition.

Some types to look at....you did not mention your budget however.

Suzuki SV650....lovely little bikes, great for commuting.Decent speed,reliable,good mpg.£ 2500 to £5000 ( owned one )

Suzuki GSF650 ( Bandit ) again great bike for virtually anything you throw at it,reliable,good mpg.£2000 to £ 5500 ( owned one )

Yamaha Diversion 600 the old type was the archtypical despatach riders bike...good reccomendation. £1500 to £ 5500

Kawasaki Versys 650...This bike is a cracker, excellent riding position,great brakes,220 mile tank range,beautiful engine, good lights etc etc...£3000 to £6000 ( owned one )

Or choose an old BMW like a R100GS,R1100GS....absolute workhorse, built for massive miles and comfort..very,very cheap to insure( got one now )
What he said.Especially about the Diversion and Bandit. Aldi have just had a run on budget bike attire. It's fairly good stuff. Lidl sometimes do winter gear too. Dont bother with the helmets though..
 

girliebiker

Old-Salt
The Deauville has a good write up in the latest Rider mag, shaft drive so low maintenance.

I ride an XJR 1300, naked bikes are ok for short commutes but can get abit uncomfortable on long m/way commutes (though also keeps your speed down).

Most bikes mentioned above are good bikes and would fit your needs:

Suzuki Bandit 600, with a fairing, you can pick one up for £1000+, easy to ride, quick enough when needs, but naked ones tend to have been thrashed by new riders, so check them over, loads out there, so some good deals to be had. Easy to ride, spares are plentiful and lots have been looked after by owners, especially the half faired ones.

Suzuki SV650, very good rep, more sporty looking than the Bandit.

Yamaha FZS 600 Fazer, pre FZ6 model, £1200 ish upwards, better handling than the Bandit, very good tank range (i got 180+ from a tank riding at m/way speeds-ish , sat at 80mph), ideal first 'big' bike, also they tend to have been well looked after. Easy to ride in traffic and around town, very forgiving bike if you are in the wrong gear etc

Some sports tourer bikes are also good:

Honda CBR 600F, or the Yamaha YZF 600 Thundercat (excellent bike my mate did over 54k in 2 years on one no probs), also not as popular as the CBR but just as capable, fairly cheap and a lot of them are owned by girls for some reason, not sure why as they are top bikes.

If your not concerned about image an older Yamaha Diversion would also be worth looking at. Good commuting bikes, easy to ride and look after, i know the 900 is shaft drive i think the 600 may be as well.

Best of luck with the license and getting a bike. As someone else posted, try them on for size, even if you don't test ride one, as a new rider being sat comfortably with at least one foot able to touch the ground with more than just your tip toes, handle bars a comfortable reach, levers easy to reach, can all be discovered just sitting on a bike in a shop. Most of the above bikes wil handle rougly the same anyway
I used to ride my Thundercat back and forth to Munich for 2 years, loved it. You can pick them fairly cheaply at the moment. It's a good height too if you are a little on the short side, the reach is good and you don't end up leaning on the tank. Handled well in ice and snow, better than my Kwack did.

Just watch out for large Kraut's coming round corners on the wrong side of the road, they hurt :-(
 

P_J

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
I'd go for a CBR600F personally - cracking bike, never let us down, very comfy, responded like an addition to your body with everything that was asked of her. Went round Ireland on her for a week and there wasn't a single second I thought "must have a break because my arrse/arms/legs need a break.
 
P-J, I am sure the CBR 600 was a good bike for you - and a fine bike in general - but(and this is important here) did you read the question? I dont think the CBR600F is an ideal beginners bike or commuter bike.
 
I'm in exactly the same predicament as Alfred, except that I prefer something smaller and not so quick. I've a round trip of 25 miles per day over some quite drastic hills.

I'm torn between my old Mod days and going for something like a Vespa PX 125 or something completely different, a 125cc Cruiser.

For the Cruiser, I particularly like the Suzuki 125 Marauder or the Yamaha Eliminator 125.
For the scooter, something I can stick a few decals on, stick on me ol' Parka and join the local S.C.

125cc is my max and nothing too much maint as I'm the laziest twat in NATO. I've a grand and a bit.

Advice required
 
Fat Cav,

DO NOT buy a 125 "cruiser" (unless you want everyone to laugh at you all the time). The only possible reason to own a 125 cruiser is because you are on L plates and have legs approximately 12 inches long.

If 125 is your engine size, I would go the scooter route, since that seems to be your thing anyway. Otherwise, consider a 125 in a "trail bike" configuration - the only respectable option for a 125.
 
Fat Cav,

DO NOT buy a 125 "cruiser" (unless you want everyone to laugh at you all the time). The only possible reason to own a 125 cruiser is because you are on L plates and have legs approximately 12 inches long.

If 125 is your engine size, I would go the scooter route, since that seems to be your thing anyway. Otherwise, consider a 125 in a "trail bike" configuration - the only respectable option for a 125.
Are they really that bad? A mate a few years ago had a Kymco cruiser which looked good, if you liked that sort of thing, but he told is was as relaible and an un-reliable thing in a un-reliable contest.

Trail bikes do nothing for me at all. I suppose it'll be the Scooter route.

Cheers
 
Fat Cav,

Yes, they are that bad.

One of the defining features of a "proper cruiser" is a torquey (usually air-cooled twin) motor. Some 125 cruisers do, indeed, have genuine V twin engines! Alas, torque is not present in any meaningful quantity.

The whole point of a cruiser is that it should be able to - well - cruise.
At 125cc with a full size adult on board, all it could do is wheeze.

Another thing a cruiser should have is a bit of visual presence - again, not something a 125 can pull off. And a pleasingly deep and loud exhaust note - same detail. Ditto on comfortable ride for a full size rider.

Even 500cc is on the small side for a respectable "cruiser".

May I suggest a scooter with pedigree is what you need. Something Italian. And a sharp new suit!
 

Dwarf

LE
Helmet is top priority. You can get a good quality one from £90, look on Ghostbikes website, Carberg VR2 is a good one. Don't get a lid off e bay, try them on first for sizing.
Good advice.
My daughter's boyfriend bought a bike for more or less the same resons as you, mainly for work. Four weeks ago ago he came off the road on his new BMW, not doing anything stupid, and had an argument with a tree. Result to the tree, he is now at home with a broken, collar bone, knee, arm (in 3 places) nerve damage to his hand and minus his spleen. But he had splashed out on a kevlar helmet and his nut came off without a scratch.

Me, I'd stick to the car, but don't let me discourage you. Good luck.
 
Bonniet - "This Yamaha YZf600r is the best for newbie rider, does not drink to much either."

On which planet is that then? Granted it is slightly more beginner friendly than a Fireblade, but that hardly makes it THE BEST for a newbie rider. Did you even bother reading his requirement?
 

girliebiker

Old-Salt
Take a look at a Honda Baby Blade, 400cc if my memory is correct, if not I'm sure someone will correct me! A comfy ride for both long and short journeys, a substanial bike and reasonably reliable. Do they still make them?

A 400 to 600cc will give you the handling and just the right amount of speed that a new rider needs. They have enough speed for a new rider to cope with but will also give you the power to get out of tricky situations. They allow you to build your confidence, you can always upgrade later.

You can do a weeks course (can not for the life of me think what they are called), most of the local centres offerring this course use 600cc bikes.

Always take a bike for a test ride, make sure that you feel comfy and that you can place your feet firmly on the ground when stationary, you don't want to holding the bike on tip toes. Find one that "fits" you.




please excuse crap spelling & incoherent sentences, i've just finished my night shift and fear I may have left my brain in my locker :)
 
. . . please excuse crap spelling & incoherent sentences, i've just finished my night shift and fear I may have left my brain in my locker :)
I hope you didn't ride home? :wink:
 
Most 400cc class bikes are grey imports. They are mostly small framed which is part of the reason they are grey imports (designed to fit asian riders rather than Europeans and sold in the asian markets only) and also accounts for their reputation as girls bikes.

Nothing wrong with a 400 if you are shorter than average. They should have enough oomph for motorway work as long as you dont plan any Euro touring.
 

P_J

Old-Salt
Book Reviewer
P-J, I am sure the CBR 600 was a good bike for you - and a fine bike in general - but(and this is important here) did you read the question? I dont think the CBR600F is an ideal beginners bike or commuter bike.
Yes I did read the question. Going from a 125 straight up to a 600 wasn't that difficult. I'd disagree on it not being an ideal commuter bike, but that comes down to personal preference. I'd much prefer the CBR6F than the likes of a Bandit 6 or a Gixxer 6 or the Thundercat, but once again, that's personal preference. I wasn't the only one to suggest the CBR6F so it can't be that bad. The knack is to find what is comfy for you, fits your requirements, size and frame, pocket and your riding style. The only way to do that is to get your arrse on a lot of bikes.
 

Pegleg

Swinger
Get a bike your happy with but i do recomend doing some advanced training. IAM, RoSPA, etc . Cheaper insurance as well
 

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