Posh oil or Generic?

#41
I have a 14 yr old car with very high mileage as I'm doing a lot of commuting at the moment and don't fancy throwing money at a newer car just to drive it in to the ground. It's petrol and I change the oil and filters every 4 - 5 thousand miles, using synthetic oil which works out around £50 all in. Probably seems excessive but it gives peace of mind.
£50 for oil & filter sounds a bit premium ?

I previously used a high mileage diesel car and did the same but changed the oil filter more frequently - i.e, also between oil changes; then topped up the oil to replenish what's lost with the old filter. Diesel engines really don't like dirty oil so £5 (ish) for a filter and 10 minutes swapping it out, seems worth it. It was just about to clock over 200k before somebody redesigned the OSR for me - otherwise I'd still be using it.
I thought you'd be better off changing the filter ever other change if your changing the oil early ?
 
#42
Given the rather high cost of say 5/30 motor oil, is it worth spending out for say, Shell, or are the generics (Tesco's etc) the same but in a different package?/
Not entirely sure why that question should have been rated as dumb... I never buy oil* - wouldn't know quite where to put it if I did and thus it is a reasonable question.

I doubt that the cheapest will be 'as good' as the dearest but if changed regularly... is the cheapest good enough? Bit like diesel I suppose. There are those that won't buy supermarket fuel, insisting that BP/Shell/Texaco premium diesel is better for performance/engine longevity etc than standard diesel and a billion times better than supermarket.

Supermarket has served me adequately in my all of my cars over the years and there have been many.

*always main dealer serviced according to service schedule.
 
#43
Oil is just oil, just top it up and maybe change it every 10.000/ 15/000 miles.
If you put synthetic oil into an old engine it will leak like a sieve.
A fair point. Synthetic is specified for the engine and loss is minimal considering its age and mileage. (All things are relative - I've owned numerous Land Rovers over the years).
 
#44
£50 for oil & filter sounds a bit premium ?



I thought you'd be better off changing the filter ever other change if your changing the oil early ?
Oil choice as specified for the engine which is known for its lengevity if the timing chain is changed at the correct intervals and kept well lubricated with clean oil - and one of the reasons I chose that particular car in the first place. Oil filters are a curiously underrated element of engineering.
 
#45
Nothing stops any one mixing the 2. ..minérale and synthétique = 3 in 1
If you are a cost custer type of a person. ...
Any way, just saying : too many bangers in circulation
 
#46
Engine oils have come a long way and any product that meets the makers spec. should be OK. But....

And those buts have changed over the years. A few of the killers:

Continual short journeys
Stop start urban use with lot of idling
Off road
Dusty conditions
Towing
Modern diesel engines with high exhaust gas recirculation rates

Car makers haven't helped with:

Stupidly long specified oil change intervals.
Ever lower viscosity oils to reduce drag and thus CO2 and improve mpg.
Engines with low oil capacity
Lubrication sensitive components incapable of servicing without removal of engine (timing chain a favourite).

Engine damage and death through oil thickening and black sludge blocking pick up strainer and oilways stopped being a thing long time ago. Then all of the above in modern engines conspired to bring it back again.

Even Toyota, BMW & Mercedes got hammered by it.

Moral: choose an oil you are happy with and change it and filter more than you want to.

I tend to use Shell Helix Ultra as it has a very "clean" synthetic base stock.

Oh if if you have an automatic transmission change the fluid (and filter if you can, usually means dropping oil pan).. "Sealed for life" is bullshit and 60k miles rule of thumb, less if used in high temperatures or for towing.

80% of all misery with autos linked in some way to oil oxidation and consumption of the complex additive packages over time.
 
#48
Interesting thread, in some respects.
My 26 years old Roadster, at 146,000 sometimes brutal track/ club run events has enjoyed a "diet" of it's appropriate Castrol GTX & OEM filter for it's 16 years in my ownership...every 4/5k miles or twice a year which ever happened first.

That's an old-school iron block/alloy head twin cam with hydraulic cam lifters...not solid lifters.
A couple of years back, I felt the cylinder head gasket was looking dodgy and when we lifted the head off, I was expecting "not the best". To our surprise, the cylinder bore X-hatching was still visible but the piston oil rings looked a bit suspect so we changed them out while "in there". Bit of an engine-out hassle, but my mate is an experienced retired race-engine builder.

Mirror this against the later Mx5 Mk3/Mk3.5 facelift cars the first of whicvh hit the roads in 2006. There is now a issue emerging with these part "family" Duratec/Mazda mills, having passed through many owners with big & small end crank bearings failing and of late crank main bearings....all down to people (claiming) they stuck to handbook service intervals, and most can prove they have as Mazda dealers use a computer record. Now, the watchword is halve...yes bloody halve....the oil changes and at all times ensure the level is up to or even a smidge over the full dipstick mark. And gents, these are Mazda generic 1800cc & 2000cc mills which were part FoMoCo family engines globally used in a variety of applications, and said way back to be equally bullet proof as my old engine is.
The issue for these owners now is these engines, if you can even find one, exceed the value of the whole car, and quite a few have gone to scrap as a result.

My view is, from long experience, ditch what the handbook says and change the stuff twice as often with a decent quality oil, but always use a proper filter...not some blue-box cheapo filled with cardboard. And..always check the magnetic plug for swarf, maiking sure to clean it off.
 
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#49
Engine oils have come a long way and any product that meets the makers spec. should be OK. But....

And those buts have changed over the years. A few of the killers:

Continual short journeys
Stop start urban use with lot of idling
Off road
Dusty conditions
Towing
Modern diesel engines with high exhaust gas recirculation rates

Car makers haven't helped with:

Stupidly long specified oil change intervals.
Ever lower viscosity oils to reduce drag and thus CO2 and improve mpg.
Engines with low oil capacity
Lubrication sensitive components incapable of servicing without removal of engine (timing chain a favourite).

Engine damage and death through oil thickening and black sludge blocking pick up strainer and oilways stopped being a thing long time ago. Then all of the above in modern engines conspired to bring it back again.

Even Toyota, BMW & Mercedes got hammered by it.

Moral: choose an oil you are happy with and change it and filter more than you want to.

I tend to use Shell Helix Ultra as it has a very "clean" synthetic base stock.

Oh if if you have an automatic transmission change the fluid (and filter if you can, usually means dropping oil pan).. "Sealed for life" is bullshit and 60k miles rule of thumb, less if used in high temperatures or for towing.

80% of all misery with autos linked in some way to oil oxidation and consumption of the complex additive packages over time.
Very true about ridiculous long service times and sealed for life bollox , its done just to get the operating cost down to attract the fleet buyers , in reality if you intend keeping a low mileage car for five or more years change the oils and filters twice as often as recommended , oil is very cheap compared with a new engine.

I`ve always used supermarket / budget oil in run of the mill cars and premium oil in premium cars , only ever blown up a couple of engines in 40 years but that was through sheer abuse.
 
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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#50
As long as the oil meets the vehicle manufacturers requirements as stated in your car handbook it should be ok.
Personally like tyres I buy the best oil I can afford.
My first full licence bike I put Avon Roadrunners on...like being glued to the road after the generic Honda fitted tyres.

Compare and contrast

Avons - £91 each
Pirelli Angel City - £56 each
( I couldn't find Hankook - probably cheaper)
 
#51
The Haynes manual says''To reassemble do what you just did in reverse order''.
Not what they used to be though, I have one for my Ibiza and one for my Scrambler, neither have an 'exploded diagram', which sometimes is all you need. I had (still have?) one for my Tr Spitfire (first car) and it was so much easier when doing stuff.
 
#52
My first full licence bike I put Avon Roadrunners on...like being glued to the road after the generic Honda fitted tyres.

Compare and contrast

Avons - £91 each
Pirelli Angel City - £56 each
( I couldn't find Hankook - probably cheaper)
I remember people doing that when they bought a brand new bike from a dealer. Ironically now the Japanese make some of the best tyres you can buy
 
#53
I was always picky about tyres but then on a bike I reckon more than half of it is down to confidence.
But I tend to go for mid range brand named tyres so while they may not be the latest tech they will at least be decent compounds.

That said there's always the old mechanics tale.
Guy goes into a garage and asks 'How much for some cheap tyres for my daughters car?'
Fitters response 'How cheap is your daughter'?
 
#54
If you've bought an ultra-economical car for the wife's shopping trips, I find a short weekly blast down the motorway in 3rd gear brings it up to temperature, clears all the waxy gunk round the oil filler cap, clears various hypersensitive sensor valves that'll show dashboard warnings, gets it through MOT emission tests if it goes straight in for probing, and so on. The little three-mile stop-start trips kill cheap oils, but you bought it intending it to be cheap to run, including unbranded oils from In Excess or The Range.
Got a nice motor for yourself? Sometimes buying maker's labelled oil from the dealership is, surprisingly, a bit cheaper than a branded one from Halfords and that's what they use during servicing.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#55
I remember people doing that when they bought a brand new bike from a dealer. Ironically now the Japanese make some of the best tyres you can buy
my old 250 G5 was far from new...and the 'pattern' tyres were probably pretty worn, but I was impressed with the Avons nonetheless.

And Hankook are Korean.
 
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#56
If you've bought an ultra-economical car for the wife's shopping trips, I find a short weekly blast down the motorway in 3rd gear brings it up to temperature, clears all the waxy gunk round the oil filler cap, clears various hypersensitive sensor valves that'll show dashboard warnings, gets it through MOT emission tests if it goes straight in for probing, and so on. The little three-mile stop-start trips kill cheap oils, but you bought it intending it to be cheap to run, including unbranded oils from In Excess or The Range.
Got a nice motor for yourself? Sometimes buying maker's labelled oil from the dealership is, surprisingly, a bit cheaper than a branded one from Halfords and that's what they use during servicing.
It is known as an Italian tune up in the bike world.
BTW thread drift.
I have ordered a pair of Nitrous rear shocks and handmade silencers from OS Pipes for my lil' Breva.
The old girl deserves it, as do i.
 
#57
If you check Tesco's have a 50% off sale on the fully synth Castrol from time to time seems to be store dependant I got 2Ltrs for the scoot for £4 result.
 

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