Poppies at Tower of London:

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LE
A splendid sight but if you are planning to go this weekend (along with many, many others) take careful note and plan accordingly:

"This weekend (Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 November) large numbers of people are expected to visit the Tower of London's major art installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, marking 100 years since the first full day of Britain's involvement in the First World War.

There will be no Tube services to Tower Hill station all weekend due to District line improvement work and surrounding stations are likely to be busier than usual

There will be no service on the District line this weekend between South Kensington and Aldgate East,

There will be no service on the Circle line this weekend between Gloucester Road and Aldgate (via Victoria). Trains will operate between Hammersmith and Aldgate (via King's Cross St. Pancras), and between Edgware Road and Gloucester Road (via High Street Kensingon)

https://www.tfl.gov.uk/campaign/tower-of-london-remembers?intcmp=23153

You have been warned.
 
It was the same last weekend, with crowds heading to the Tower just to see the Poppy display, 1 lane of the road was taken up with pedestrians walking around the Tower. In fairness Bank station is a short walk away so long as you know the way.....
 
My office is pretty much bang opposite the area....They were even asking for volunteers from people at work to help set it up. Wanted to do it, but all the spaces were already gone by the time I emailed them back.
 
I took my five year old son. He was overawed by it all. It was hard to explain to a five year old the significance of it all.
 
I went to see the display last weekend, I was quite awestruck when I caught a glimpse through the crowds, however, it did take me about 25 minutes to navigate around Germans, dog walkers and people with pushchairs but apart from that it was worth it.

I was very disappointed with the behaviour of a certain ethnicity group there however, who were quite vocally opposed to the tribute for whatever reason.
 

X59

LE
Read somewhere that any poppies broken during the assembly on site / planting are returned to the manufacturer and given a burial, as every one represents a life lost.

The same article reports that a number of names of the fallen (don't recall how many) are read aloud each evening at sunset and The Last Post is played.

Every name will have been read by the 11th November.
 
...
I was very disappointed with the behaviour of a certain ethnicity group there however, who were quite vocally opposed to the tribute for whatever reason.
Whatever the cause for that particular " ethnicity group" to be opposed, there's no reason for the rest of us to be diverted from what is, in the first case, a beautiful effort to give some thanks to the people under consideration, and in the second, for the thought and effort given by the people who made the display.

On the first: Good on them, their memory, their families and everyone who's been deprived of their company in the last few hundred years.
 
I went there on Monday with Mrs B. It is a truly moving and thought provoking sight.

I got chatting with an American tourist from Florida who didn't know about the poppies - he was there to look at the Crown Jewels and see the Queen. When he asked what the poppy field was all about, I explained the significance of the poppies. He thought there would only be about 20,000 poppies not the nigh-on 900,000 and didn't realise that the Great War lasted from 1914 to 1918 and WWII from 1939 to 1945. He explained that history lessons at his school when he was a kid, only covered the USA's involvement in both conflicts. So in his eyes (up to Monday) WW1 was 1917 to 1918, and WWII went from 1941 to 1945. He was somewhat taken back - and I think a little embarrassed - when I explained the scale of our losses and our involvement before the Americans arrived on the scene.

I really felt like telling him that the yanks always turn up late for a war, unless they're starting one - but tact and diplomacy dictated that I merely stated that we were grateful for their support.
 
The same article reports that a number of names of the fallen (don't recall how many) are read aloud each evening at sunset and The Last Post is played.

Every name will have been read by the 11th November.

It's around 180 per night. However it isn't the case that each name will have been read out by the 11th November (since the installation is only open for around 103 days they'd have to read 8600 names each night!). Those names being read have all been nominated by someone - I nominated several relatives and had them accepted. They've now closed nominations as they have enough to take them through to the end of the installation on 11 November.

You can watch the recordings of each reading here https://poppies.hrp.org.uk/roll-of-honour
 

X59

LE
It's around 180 per night. However it isn't the case that each name will have been read out by the 11th November (since the installation is only open for around 103 days they'd have to read 8600 names each night!). Those names being read have all been nominated by someone - I nominated several relatives and had them accepted. They've now closed nominations as they have enough to take them through to the end of the installation on 11 November.

You can watch the recordings of each reading here https://poppies.hrp.org.uk/roll-of-honour

Happy to stand corrected.

It's a nice touch, even if the numbers are limited.
 
Took my mother today, it is truly moving. Very crowded but people spend quite a bit of time silently contemplating the sea of poppies. Nice tribute to the fallen.
 

Bookman123

Old-Salt
Went yesterday with family, absolutely packed at 10.30 a.m., they seemed to have put up extra barriers around, maybe to channel the crowds, not sure. Anyway got some good photo's and saw the Poppies from different parts of the moat. While in London took son to Saint Pauls, he was mightly impressed - high praise from a 16 year old - and again he took some great pictures of London from the Dome, still a magnificent building. Moved on to Covent Garden and my wife bought a signed limited edtion of the Poppies at the Tower of London in an evening scene by a photographer called Hugh Sun. A very good Photograph.

All in all a good day.
 
I've swapped my seat from an A to an F, so provided the weather is OK next Monday - and it's 27 arrivals - I should swoop majestically overhead and avoid the unwashed thongs.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
It's kind of inevitable that the poppies will start appearing on eBay before much longer.
They don't get sent out to the original.purchasers until mid Jan earliest. They have to be washed off, checked for damage and boxed up. De-installation starts on 12 Nov, I'm down for one spot on 14th.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I was there on Wednesday. The Tube station was open and shut all day, according to a copper I spoke to.

It's just a shame that there wasn't a little more of the travel marshalling that we saw during the Olympics - it's a unique and very moving tribute, and interest/demand could've perhaps been better anticipated.

As to a very vocal bunch of morons... morons is precisely the word, given that some of those poppies will be for those of their own ethnicity. But never let knowledge get in the way of ignorance and prejudice, eh?
 
They don't get sent out to the original.purchasers until mid Jan earliest. They have to be washed off, checked for damage and boxed up. De-installation starts on 12 Nov, I'm down for one spot on 14th.

I would have quite liked one to lay on my great-uncle's grave near Arras, but you just know that it would get nicked in five minutes.
 

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