Poor UK education standards

Gave you a like, but unless you’re about 120 years old, it’s hard to be an RE Scaley. You can be Wedge, or Scaley, but not both, unless you change capbadge (eg some LEs).

RE with a signals (small “s”) bent - of course. But not a Scaley. Unles you’re ~120 :)



Haha ok, I was C3S - we called ourselves scaleys, but fair point - I’m sure that’s not what R sigs described us as! :)
 
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True, although I also get sense of "throwing out the baby with the bathwater" in many responses.

I am on the downward slope of life; just use my computer for social sites (like Arrse).
Most of what I read here may as well be written in Chinese, as far as my understanding goes.:?
What are these "e mails" of which you speak?
 
This is all you’re getting:
View attachment 682874


You’re a predatory camera owner who never served in the army nor worked in a school. Probably legally I suspect not even allowed anywhere within 100m of a school. Claims to have previously been a teacher but has no idea about pedagogy and didn’t even know what the term digital native means until I posted the wiki on it. And given the time it is where you are now, also not much more going on than to sit up all night drinking and insulting strangers on the internet. You need help.

Whatever, Walter. Everything you post means another lie you have to remember. I can wait.
Apologies for the thread derailment.
 
I am on the downward slope of life; just use my computer for antisocial sites (like Arrse).

Corrected it for you. FOC.

Although, my associates and I may ask you for a small favour at some time ...

morden.jpg
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
Exactly, and watch the stares you get if on a train (or especially bus or Tube in London) you pull out a physical book and read it or *Lord Have Mercy* starting writing in a notebook or jotter; people look at you as if you've grown horns! Such dumbing down...
Horses for courses, of course, but I was recently congratulated by a passing station cleaner for reading "a real book" rather than having a screen in front of me.

I also have an engineering friend who keeps a slide rule - which his younger staff seem to file as "ritual object" (museum speak for "we don't know what this is or did but it seems important"). Not to mention the kids who had it drilled into them that hand written thank you cards generate more good will than a text, which their grandparents are highly unlikely to see anyway.
 
That's often not incompetence, just the way they have been trained to use files. I have an iPad I have to use for some applications and I am continually frustrated at how impossible it is to see and move files easily. My Android phone is slightly better but not by much, to the extent it's often easier to re-download a spreadsheet or document for the tenth time than it is to try and find the previous versions already there.

Trying to move a file from my iPad to a Windows PC? I've given up and now email myself anything I need, effectively using the email server as a transfer system.

Speaking of which, organising emails also appears to be something that teenagers are fundamentally clueless about. Lots of them have multiple thousand unread emails which they just ignore and use the search function to find something they might need later.

I've long taken the view that I'll use whichever tool offers the most convenience and least cognitive effort. Many's the time I've been using Mathcad/Mathematica/Maple Flow/Excel/Numbers/whatever to rough up some ideas, and at some point or another, I'll usually pick up pen & paper and scribble out a diagram or some derivation.

And there are possibly good reasons why it pays to be flexible on such matters.

 
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Horses for courses, of course, but I was recently congratulated by a passing station cleaner for reading "a real book" rather than having a screen in front of me...
On the other hand, a Kindle or suchlike is capable of storing quite a collection of books, rather than just the one you hold?
 
On the other hand, a Kindle or suchlike is capable of storing quite a collection of books, rather than just the one you hold?

I prefer reading on an e-reader. I like the fact that on my Kobo I can change the size of the font, increase the spacing between lines, and also the backlight makes it easier to read. I find reading on a decent e-reader screen is nicer than physical paper.
 
On the other hand, a Kindle or suchlike is capable of storing quite a collection of books, rather than just the one you hold?
However, the UI hasn't yet managed to successfully replicate the 3D page-flipping capability of the multilayer compressed-tree format. Nor the pullout centrefold.
 
I prefer reading on an e-reader. I like the fact that on my Kobo I can change the size of the font, increase the spacing between lines, and also the backlight makes it easier to read. I find reading on a decent e-reader screen is nicer than physical paper.

At night, that is certainly the case. I can ask Alexa to turn off the room lights and still read using a Kindle app.

However, when adequately lit, I still prefer paper for its look and feel. Plus, Kindle still hasn't replicated that "new textbook" smell. Just the mention of Margenau and Murphy evokes the memory of its scent and sets the serotonin flowing.
 
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