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Poo Pipes, what are my options?

I had a leak where a toilet waste pipe joins to a wall and as with much of the rest of the house this appears to be the result of some poor bodging. The original 110mm waste pipe is lead and stops flush to the wall however at some point the lead has been buckled around the inside (my guess is someone tried to force in another section of pipe as they went to plumb in the toilet, anyway...because this is buckled (but still sound) I cant fit in a standard toilet waste pipe connector. Neither could the bloke who tried previously but this is something he tried to rectify by slapping silicone everywhere but obviously without success.

As I dont want to have to remove the existing lead pipe I'm thinking about running a flexible pipe (90 or 100mm) through the wall so that it reaches the drain and then adapting/mating it to a wall plate/connection with an exterior 110mm connector. my questions;

1. Can I get away with this without the toilet blocking/backing up every time it gets flushed?
2. Is this a stupid idea for reasons I havent even thought of?
 
I had a leak where a toilet waste pipe joins to a wall and as with much of the rest of the house this appears to be the result of some poor bodging. The original 110mm waste pipe is lead and stops flush to the wall however at some point the lead has been buckled around the inside (my guess is someone tried to force in another section of pipe as they went to plumb in the toilet, anyway...because this is buckled (but still sound) I cant fit in a standard toilet waste pipe connector. Neither could the bloke who tried previously but this is something he tried to rectify by slapping silicone everywhere but obviously without success.

As I dont want to have to remove the existing lead pipe I'm thinking about running a flexible pipe (90 or 100mm) through the wall so that it reaches the drain and then adapting/mating it to a wall plate/connection with an exterior 110mm connector. my questions;

1. Can I get away with this without the toilet blocking/backing up every time it gets flushed?
2. Is this a stupid idea for reasons I havent even thought of?

has your bloke tried
 
has your bloke tried
thanks, I cant see what I'm looking for (some way of going from 110mm toilet to 100/90mm pipe going through the wall) at first glance but dig through their brochure
 

964ST

War Hero
Very tricky without having to Bodge again!
A flexi pipe is not ideal cause it reduces the inside diameter, and every mm counts in my experience?

Ideal solution would remove the old and stick with the DIN sized new piping 110.

My bodge would be get a 110mm piece adapter for a normal toilet and cut a slot length ways where it enters the wall, so it is slightly conical when pressed together. Coat it in the best poop resistant sealant available and batter the thing in as far as it will go, hopefully it would reform the lead and ideally be driven home (I would make sure the slot I cut was uppermost so that if necessary you can seal any slot and avoid the chance of a future Turdicle).
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
If you only have one toilet in the house, then consider hiring a portaloo for a week
makes life easier
also dont forget to check the angle that the pipe comes out of the old toilet
if its an old one, replace the bugger now, modern loos come out at 90 degress
older ones were canted down, that causes lots of problems, I saw one muppet had installed the soil pipe tapering away from the wall to allow it to connect

the lead pipe will probably earn you a few quid in scrap anyway

check where it goes into the ground it should have a concrete collar, or a porcelain section

a complete lead waste system would be very very old, so overdue for replacement any way
sure its not cast iron outside ?

if it is you need to be bloody careful when removing it, same for lead
I usually hook some rope around a pulley and a mate lower it down, otherwise it can kill you
if its cast, then there will be collars filled with putty or cement, chip that away first to allow you to seperate the sections, dont forget it has to rise above the gutter line to allow it to vent
I usually use solvent weld for that section, and install some strap banding to the fascia to prevent any movement

I usually remove as much of the high level pipe as possible, then if there is not coupling at ground level, I use an angle grinder to cut the pipe an ainch above the ground, however be bloody careful as methane gas is explosive, cut as much as you cna and finish off with a hacksaw, then clean up the edges with a file, clean the inside edges with plumbers wipes, then sandpaper, then use silicon grease to lube the adaptor, wiggle it ionto place carefully, then the new soil pipe will slide in
you will probably have to cut the cement away around the entry, and even lift a few bricks out to get unobstructed access, then make good once its all connected
oh andmake sure you use good quality corrosion resistan screws to fix the brackets to the wall
2 and a half inch twelves with brown plugs
 

4(T)

LE
If you put an insert into the lead, it does need to be maximum diameter possible - otherwise you risk blocking.

The waste is low pressure and drains away quickly with gravity, so you just need something to carry it the 6-8" or so into the lead.

As 964ST suggests, its worth just cutting the top of a normal pan connector so that you can get it far enough into the lead.

Alternatively, on some of the connectors, you can trim about 15mm diameter off the flexible sealing "fins" without touching the pipe section itself. Use plumbers putty or something to provide an alternative seal.

At least with toilets its easy enough to loose-fit them and test your bodged creation for leakage.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I had a leak where a toilet waste pipe joins to a wall and as with much of the rest of the house this appears to be the result of some poor bodging. The original 110mm waste pipe is lead and stops flush to the wall however at some point the lead has been buckled around the inside (my guess is someone tried to force in another section of pipe as they went to plumb in the toilet, anyway...because this is buckled (but still sound) I cant fit in a standard toilet waste pipe connector. Neither could the bloke who tried previously but this is something he tried to rectify by slapping silicone everywhere but obviously without success.

As I dont want to have to remove the existing lead pipe I'm thinking about running a flexible pipe (90 or 100mm) through the wall so that it reaches the drain and then adapting/mating it to a wall plate/connection with an exterior 110mm connector. my questions;

1. Can I get away with this without the toilet blocking/backing up every time it gets flushed?
2. Is this a stupid idea for reasons I havent even thought of?

Option 1: Get a professional to fix it properly.
Option 2: Flood your home with sewage and ask Earth to support your application for Indian citizenship.
 

anglo

LE
I had a leak where a toilet waste pipe joins to a wall and as with much of the rest of the house this appears to be the result of some poor bodging. The original 110mm waste pipe is lead and stops flush to the wall however at some point the lead has been buckled around the inside (my guess is someone tried to force in another section of pipe as they went to plumb in the toilet, anyway...because this is buckled (but still sound) I cant fit in a standard toilet waste pipe connector. Neither could the bloke who tried previously but this is something he tried to rectify by slapping silicone everywhere but obviously without success.

As I dont want to have to remove the existing lead pipe I'm thinking about running a flexible pipe (90 or 100mm) through the wall so that it reaches the drain and then adapting/mating it to a wall plate/connection with an exterior 110mm connector. my questions;

1. Can I get away with this without the toilet blocking/backing up every time it gets flushed?
2. Is this a stupid idea for reasons I havent even thought of?
Do the job properly, do it once,
A bodged job costs a lot of money
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Waste pipes are 110mm for a reason, if you try and reduce that diameter, you may have one big stinking mess of a problem.

Pull it all out and put a new waste pipe in. So much easier.
 
this isn’t the answer I was hoping for guys, even if it was the one I was expecting....

it’s just a spare toilet and downstairs so not too much of a drama. Had been hoping there was an easier fix as there’s about 2000 other jobs waiting to be done prior to this. Ho hum.
 

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ACAB

LE
Just rip out the lead pipe, and install a new 110mm soil pipe with a collar at the bottom at ground level
easiest in the long run
That is exactly what were having done on our soil pipe (once this bloody Covid nonsense is out the way) It will cost in the region of £500.
 

Tyk

LE
That third pic is a total no-no. While you might be able to reform it to circular with something like a brass former I wouldn't try it's very deformed and could easily be split.
Be far better to replace (at a minimum) the section through the wall to the T joint on the vertical.

Bodging will take longer, cost more in the long run and may well need a proper fix anyway.
 
I had a leak where a toilet waste pipe joins to a wall and as with much of the rest of the house this appears to be the result of some poor bodging. The original 110mm waste pipe is lead and stops flush to the wall however at some point the lead has been buckled around the inside (my guess is someone tried to force in another section of pipe as they went to plumb in the toilet, anyway...because this is buckled (but still sound) I cant fit in a standard toilet waste pipe connector. Neither could the bloke who tried previously but this is something he tried to rectify by slapping silicone everywhere but obviously without success.

As I dont want to have to remove the existing lead pipe I'm thinking about running a flexible pipe (90 or 100mm) through the wall so that it reaches the drain and then adapting/mating it to a wall plate/connection with an exterior 110mm connector. my questions;

1. Can I get away with this without the toilet blocking/backing up every time it gets flushed?
2. Is this a stupid idea for reasons I havent even thought of?
Well,it's a day off work and fun for all the family.
1609606014915.png

I swear there was there compo' from '83 still coming out of my Gary.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
this isn’t the answer I was hoping for guys, even if it was the one I was expecting....

it’s just a spare toilet and downstairs so not too much of a drama. Had been hoping there was an easier fix as there’s about 2000 other jobs waiting to be done prior to this. Ho hum.
Thats a cast iron oil pipe outside, best replace the bloody lot, also fit an access eye so if you get a blockage you can unscrew it and rod it through ( or get covered with shit)
plus, if you need to add other plumbing outlets, it will be easier to cut into
 
Lead you can get away with if it is for waste, but if it is damaged you need to consider a good repair - especially as it is waste from the bog, you don't need that going wrong at 19.00hrs on a sunday. Do the job properly and swap it for plastic, it will be much safer and less pfaffing around in the long term - send the Mrs to visit her sister for a couple of days.

If anyone has any lead water mains pipes coming into the house the water people will ordinarily change those free of charge - don't assume they will, still check with them. Some used to argue that anything after the meter was yours, and some just used to change any lead up to the stop tap in the house. There were some really old places out in Leamington Spa & Warwick that still had lead indoors and we swapped that out for copper from the stop tap indoors.

My fellow piped water engineers, and myself used to buy most of our kit from BES. Not always next day delivery, but pretty close, so you need to have a comprehensive shopping list before ordering. When setting up an account just tell them you are a plumbist and that you want a catalogue sending.

 
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