Police vehicle procurement 1980s

In Leeds it was the registration plate. Nearly all cop cars were shitty escorts starting MUB.....

My local police force has all the number plates supplied by the same co.


Which is handy to know...
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
The VW Van polarity caught everyone out. Big fireworks display if you tried jump starting it or using it to jump start anything else.
That van was fecking awful. Lovely to poodle around in but on a shout, hell those breaks were made of butter, I was bloody standing on the brake pedal the first time I drove it on a call, first and only time I nearly early shat myself.
My operator just sat there laughing, I think he was thinking of the time off and compo.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Had a bit of a laugh reading through this thread.
The scariest time I ever spent in a motor vehicle was when I was in NWP. I was doing some overtime, and pootling around Denbigh in the V8 “Rowdy” (Sherpa). Having done my shift, I was lolling around in the back, ready to lend a hand in the next pub fight.
When an officer called for immediate assistance in Rhyl (about 15 miles away), the Sgt driving decided to ‘make towards’.
I had no idea a vehicle that big could go that fast. Short of lap belts, one could only hang on and hope for the best.
We arrived on scene, the fuss was over, and the engine boiled over.
I have never been in a tumble dryer, but I should imagine it feels like those ten minutes of terror.
Second was in a Volvo T5 on my traffic attachment ‘making’ from Prestatyn to an RTC in Bala (Bala! From here?) At the time all NWP traffic vehicles were ARV, so we had the gun locker in the back (no gats).
Still got all four wheels off the ground. Twice. Just checked: google says 40 miles in just over an hour, I think we did it in a shade under;)
I spent most of my plod career walking the beat, and glad for it.
Prior to that, I was the RACs finest driver
Give me Chieftain any day.
I loved bouncing the old sherpa vans round the mini roundabouts, the rear end would bounce all over the place, not so funny for the lads in the back.
 
I should add, in full disclosure, my experiences are from the late 1990s, when the mighty Sherpa could accommodate a shift, including the Specials.
Or the probationary team.
The much-loved rowdy, with its layers of dark blue paint was replaced with a much more swish van. Battenburg, millions of flashy lights. A thing of beauty. It‘s mere presence on the streets would make people move on.
But it couldn’t get in the nick yard because the old Rhyl nick was built over the gateway to the yard.
How we all laughed as it was then parked miles away.
And then dealt with violent people in two-door Corsas and Fiestas.
 
My local police force has all the number plates supplied by the same co.


Which is handy to know...

Could be wrong, but I think they supplied the fake number plates to Peter Sutcliffe.
 
Mine too.
Sat alongside a cracker of a paperback : A. Tom Topper's 'VERY Advanced Driving' (A Paperfront book, Elliot pub, 35p, 190pp, MCMLXX) .
It has double- declutching, unsurprisingly, but also gems such as
'The uphill start joke' and 'Switching off your indicators "automatically'
" 'Forget me not' cries the mirror at every junction"
"Three year old Buppy children",
"Most motorcyclists are optimist "Buppies" they speed crazily in traffic with unbounded fearlessness".
[ 'buppy' = "they are the customers who buy by price and appearance only ....blindly following the Ad-men". From another informative book in the Paperfront series called "Make Money in a Shop". :) ]
He's very fond of italics and reminds me of Harry Enfield's Don't Wanna Do That Man. I'm not sure he was quite all there.
He has a rant about "Socialist Clement Atlee's wife was an advanced driver but she had loads of accidents" as well.

A quick look at the series reveals the last 2 books published in the catalogue were 'Freedom and Reality (Enoch Powell) and Guilty Madmen at Whitehall ...

I remember that book, it's hilarious, I'll try to get hold of a copy. Not sure if it was meant to be serious but "A Tom Topper" certainly came across as a bit of tw*t. The same publisher did a sort of economy Haynes manual in paperback as well, they must have specialised in that sort of thing.

Just had a quick look - it's still in print!

1625260223007.png
1625260285829.png
 
My local police force has all the number plates supplied by the same co.


Which is handy to know...


As we are talking about the '80s then........

A long long time ago, in a far away galaxy when serious and organised crime in the UK was actually confronted and dealt with, what was then named DVLC used to issue three sets of number plates and tax discs for every Regional Crime Squad motor.
And motorbike, van, black cab and lorry.
The plates to be changed religiously every month, and noted in the big book of issuing in case of any alleged minor wrongdoing.
As if!
Long before camera enforcement and CCTV too.
 
I remember that book, it's hilarious, I'll try to get hold of a copy. Not sure if it was meant to be serious but "A Tom Topper" certainly came across as a bit of tw*t. The same publisher did a sort of economy Haynes manual in paperback as well, they must have specialised in that sort of thing.

Just had a quick look - it's still in print!

View attachment 586005 View attachment 586006
The yoke on the left is the very fella! (except 35, not 50p).
I would buy the rest of the books from the publisher, max-bonkers
 
I've been wanting to add more but, as the subject is now en claire, I'll just share this:

Tri-plates: cash fines for buggering up your plate / tax disc swaps went in the Whip, to be spent only at the Xmas do. Same with radio procedure, back when we could be eavesdropped and spoke in memorised number codes only. Logs, stills and videos for the debrief, but woe betide the Whip-Keeper if it wasn't there too. Only a quid a breach, but somedays someone hungover would come and stuff a fiver in, no questions asked.

Some mighty big piss-ups on the Whip.
 
As we are talking about the '80s then........

A long long time ago, in a far away galaxy when serious and organised crime in the UK was actually confronted and dealt with, what was then named DVLC used to issue three sets of number plates and tax discs for every Regional Crime Squad motor.
And motorbike, van, black cab and lorry.
The plates to be changed religiously every month, and noted in the big book of issuing in case of any alleged minor wrongdoing.
As if!
Long before camera enforcement and CCTV too.
My old fella was in No1 RCS working out of Longsight (Manchester) 1980-1983 and then the newly formed No1 RCS DDU working out of Salford Crescent 1986-1990, some of the cars and bikes the DDU had access to ranged from old ford escort vans to top of the range Granadas and pretty much everything in between.

At the formation of the DDU it was almost totally funded by the Home Office so they almost had a blank cheque for the kit they used. He once brought a mobile phone home to charge up. Something similar to below
5d01ac472500004e12e0bdcc.jpeg
 
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I had a couple of the station wagon's relatives whilst based at Butterworth in Malaysia in the mid-late 70s, ... as a "Singly", for when more than two wheels reduced the likelihood of falling off the motorbike,
1975 AB74?? OBs Prefect sml.JPG

and then as a "Bagger", when more class and style was called for
OBs PA-4444 @Pulau Tikus Flats.JPG
:
 

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