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Police Protection Officers

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
stick this on his bangstick
pair it to the phone
simples
 
stick this on his bangstick
pair it to the phone
simples
I must say I am surprised that the military and the police haven’t cottoned in to this type of thing by now, or perhaps they have?
A small tracking device concealed in anything that goes bang, in the butt or pistol grip of weapons, activated by mobile phone, or just always traceable from a laptop. Has to be the way ahead for weapons security, they have them in shopping trolleys FFS!
 
I don’t know statistics on the matter, I would hope SF soldier incidents of weapon loss are much lower than the average squaddie, perhaps you have the figures to hand and can enlighten us?
Given Them have form for collecting unauthorised weapons and dumping some of them in a river, I would suggest there is a rather cavalier attitude to weapons from some SF.
 
I must say I am surprised that the military and the police haven’t cottoned in to this type of thing by now, or perhaps they have?
A small tracking device concealed in anything that goes bang, in the butt or pistol grip of weapons, activated by mobile phone, or just always traceable from a laptop. Has to be the way ahead for weapons security, they have them in shopping trolleys FFS!
The problem is that, if you can locate items using that technology, so could someone else. There is also the issue of rfid tag range, a passive (no onboard battery, the tag is powered by the readers radio waves) RFID tag has a very limited range (a couple of metres) whereas an active (with onboard battery) tag can have a range in excess of 100 metres.
We have active tags for our twats cats. The tag is slightly larger than a 10 pence piece and the tracket is slightly larger than a credit card, with a range of up to a couple of hundred metres, with clear line of sight.
 
Has to be the way ahead for weapons security, they have them in shopping trolleys FFS!
Interesting.
Is it illegal to chip SWMBO? She fecks off with the trolley as well soon as my back's turned.
Thought about one of them, but I don't think she's too keen.
1600513554617.png
 
The problem is that, if you can locate items using that technology, so could someone else. There is also the issue of rfid tag range, a passive (no onboard battery, the tag is powered by the readers radio waves) RFID tag has a very limited range (a couple of metres) whereas an active (with onboard battery) tag can have a range in excess of 100 metres.
We have active tags for our twats cats. The tag is slightly larger than a 10 pence piece and the tracket is slightly larger than a credit card, with a range of up to a couple of hundred metres, with clear line of sight.
Hmmm, we used to have trackers on items that can be activated by remote, have a range of hundreds of miles and require a small watch like battery that is only used when the devise is activated, when inactive it is in a deep sleep, require so little power that the battery’s were guaranteed for 5 years, all that was 10 years ago in the retail industry. I am sure the tech is not only available and encryptable, so it can’t be hacked but is much better than 10 years ago and probably a lot smaller.
 
I must say I am surprised that the military and the police haven’t cottoned in to this type of thing by now, or perhaps they have?
A small tracking device concealed in anything that goes bang, in the butt or pistol grip of weapons, activated by mobile phone, or just always traceable from a laptop. Has to be the way ahead for weapons security, they have them in shopping trolleys FFS!

The technology is there, alright. But knowing how military/police minds work, it may be that the grownups believe that such safeguards might actually encourage sloppiness and the tendency to switch off.
 

Euclid

War Hero
When in NI, or anywhere, did the police go out on patrol in bricks, or confront a baying mob, all tooled up, or confront insurgents in Irac, Afghanistan, sierra Leone, Aden, Kenya, Kuwait, the Balkans, etc etc

Armed trained soldiers have been around long before the police were ever thought of.
You’ve clearly never been out in West Belfast supporting the DMSU.
 

Euclid

War Hero
One of my lads left an IWS loafing in a farmyard in NI. First thing we knew about it was when a car pulled up and the driver handed it back to us.

What was a bit strange was that we were just on the outskirts of Crossmaglen!
The locals obviously new that an IWS was more of a hinderance than a help and so were happy to hand it back.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
One of my lads left an IWS loafing in a farmyard in NI. First thing we knew about it was when a car pulled up and the driver handed it back to us.

What was a bit strange was that we were just on the outskirts of Crossmaglen!
Even the shinners thought the IWS was a piece of plastic shit!
 

FEASG

LE
I don't think having to jark our own gats, is the answer, a reliable method of carrying the thing would be better.
 
Bits of the military are probably ahead of the police in all things firearmsy, the chaps in Hereford spring to mind.
That presupposes that the chaps in Hereford aren't busy with their own stuff, doing unpleasant things to Her Majesty's enemies.
The Met's protection command is probably not far off the same size as the regiment, then add in county force's trained CP officers and the number exceeds that.
Police CPOs are well trained, but they are also human so mistakes get made. As another poster pointed out, soldiers are not immune to mistakes either.
 
I don't think having to jark our own gats, is the answer, a reliable method of carrying the thing would be better.
Most holsters used these days have some form of retention.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
That presupposes that the chaps in Hereford aren't busy with their own stuff, doing unpleasant things to Her Majesty's enemies.
The Met's protection command is probably not far off the same size as the regiment, then add in county force's trained CP officers and the number exceeds that.
Police CPOs are well trained, but they are also human so mistakes get made. As another poster pointed out, soldiers are not immune to mistakes either.

I'm sure that's correct but I was responding to a comment which suggested that the police had skills and drills parity with Hereford, which did not seem credible.

It's also worth noting that firearms-capable police officers have felt very unloved by their parent organisations and made their feelings known publicly on more than one occasion. One also has to question the moral component of a group whose members have conspicuously failed during the recent BLM/XR outings and what that means for those required to do the harder-edged stuff which may cause heartburn for a PC higher command wanting a quiet life.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
In my thirty or so years, regular and TA, I never heard of a weapon being lost.
Quick question for the site's resident Plods, how long till this chap is back wearing a tall hat?
noo the Army never lost anything
from the Times


Hundreds of munitions have been lost or stolen from the British military in the past year, according to a freedom of information request.



.
 
I'm sure that's correct but I was responding to a comment which suggested that the police had skills and drills parity with Hereford, which did not seem credible.

It's also worth noting that firearms-capable police officers have felt very unloved by their parent organisations and made their feelings known publicly on more than one occasion. One also has to question the moral component of a group whose members have conspicuously failed during the recent BLM/XR outings and what that means for those required to do the harder-edged stuff which may cause heartburn for a PC higher command wanting a quiet life.

Who suggested that they had skills and drills on parity with Hereford?

What has routine close protection got to do with a minuscule number of cops, who the press have chosen to focus on to the exclusion of the other 99.5% who have performed perfectly well. The SMT in The Met deal with life and death and high stress important decisions on a daily basis, I doubt any of them have a quiet life in a city of over 8 million or expect it.

Why do you think that The SAS handed over 99% of all CP Duties to The RMP in the seventies?
 
Hmmm, we used to have trackers on items that can be activated by remote, have a range of hundreds of miles and require a small watch like battery that is only used when the devise is activated, when inactive it is in a deep sleep, require so little power that the battery’s were guaranteed for 5 years, all that was 10 years ago in the retail industry. I am sure the tech is not only available and encryptable, so it can’t be hacked but is much better than 10 years ago and probably a lot smaller.

Bells and whistles, nothing more.

Address the basics - proper equipment, properly worn and decent training.
 

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