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Police Protection Officers

Watching too many action films.

@ThelmatheBelmer - genuine question: Have you ever carried a pistol outside of a shooting range? Or carried one at all?

There is absolutely no shame in not having done so, but what you're describing just sounds like something that someone who has only ever seen firearms in use on TV.

You don't put empty cases back into your weapon; you don't cock your pistol to de-escalate the situation - certainly this wasn't taught on any of the courses that I ever went on, and I never heard of it being taught elsewhere either.

If you've ever been taught these things I'd be interested to know where / who by.

Yes.

The weapon in question was one of the last few Browning Hi-Powers. It was at the time described as almost shot out.

Intelligent and less than law abiding individuals.
 
Why would you chamber a used casing rather than either a) a live round or b) not chamber anything?

Edit: Also, what safety devices did the pistol / holster have?

It had a safety, and the holster was a full lock, with a personalized nylon webbing and the plastic clip thing (sorry, can't remember the name) that you get with a daysack. The nylon stretches, and has to be replaced regularly, but I only had to replace a couple of the clips.
 
Why would you chamber a used casing rather than either a) a live round or b) not chamber anything?

Edit: Also, what safety devices did the pistol / holster have?

It had a safety, and the holster was a full lock, with a personalized nylon webbing and the plastic clip thing (sorry, can't remember the name) that you get with a daysack. The nylon stretches, and has to be replaced regularly, but I only had to replace a couple of the clips.

...but not if you are in an operational (both military or otherwise) situation.

I've never claimed I was. It's very good practice to not be subjected to a live fire situation in the first place.
 
Why would you chamber a used casing rather than either a) a live round or b) not chamber anything?

Edit: Also, what safety devices did the pistol / holster have?

It had a safety, and the holster was a full lock, with a personalized nylon webbing and the plastic clip thing (sorry, can't remember the name) that you get with a daysack. The nylon stretches, and has to be replaced regularly, but I only had to replace a couple of the clips.

...but not if you are in an operational (both military or otherwise) situation.

I've never claimed I was. It's very good practice to not be subjected to a live fire situation in the first place.

Funny, from the moment I joined and was trained with firearms, christ was it really 42 years ago we were trained to have finger outside the trigger guard until the weapon was aimed and ready to fire, that was from Walther and Sterling, through Ruger Speed Six, M-1 Carbine, AC-556, SLR , Hk long arms, baton guns and finally Glocks before I retired.
Just what is your experience?

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Lot of longs there... Not many sidearms.
 
@ThelmatheBelmer
I have been an AFO/SFO for 20 years and an instructor since 2007.
If it's all the same to you, I will stick to my skills and drills.
 
It had a safety, and the holster was a full lock, with a personalized nylon webbing and the plastic clip thing (sorry, can't remember the name) that you get with a daysack. The nylon stretches, and has to be replaced regularly, but I only had to replace a couple of the clips.



I've never claimed I was. It's very good practice to not be subjected to a live fire situation in the first place.



Lot of longs there... Not many sidearms.
Walther PP carried on and off duty 1978-82, Ruger Speed Six. 357 on and off duty 1982-2000, Glock 17 2000-2005 on and off duty. The only times in over 26 years I didn't have a handgun either on my person or within reach was on a couple of weeks a year when I was out of the country on holiday, since retirement I still shoot handguns for sport so at total of 42 years handgun experience including instruction.
My own handguns, Walther PPK and P99, Tanfoglio. 45 1911, S&W Model 29 44 Magnum. Also trained on Sig 226 and 228 when in the RUC during weapon evaluation, a few others I have shot, Colt Python, Webley, Enfield, P-38, Luger, Browning, HK USP, various 1911s including Colt and Kimber, S&W Model 10, CZ 75 and 85, various Glocks in different calibers, numerous. 22 pistols and revolvers
Just what experience do you have again?

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Last edited:
Walther PP carried on and off duty 1978-82, Ruger Speed Six. 357 on and off duty 1982-2000, Glock 17 2000-2005 on and off duty. The only times in over 26 years I didn't have a handgun either on my person or within reach was on a couple of weeks a year when I was out of the country on holiday, since retirement I still shoot handguns for sport so at total of 42 years handgun experience including instruction.
My own handguns, Walther PPK and P99, Tanfoglio. 45 1911, S&W Model 29 44 Magnum. Also trained on Sig 226 and 228 when in the RUC during weapon evaluation, a few others I have shot, Colt Python, Webley, Enfield, P-38, Luger, Browning, HK USP, various 1911s including Colt and Kimber, S&W Model 10, CZ 75 and 85, various Glocks in different calibers, numerous. 22 pistols and revolvers
Just what experience do you have again?

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My past is my business, and none of your own.
 
@ThelmatheBelmer

I would suggest that the quality of instruction from your "less than law abiding individuals" many not have been the best. Especially their escalation / de-escalation drills.

They appear to have taken some of their knowledge from Schwarzenegger films.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
The instructions didn't come from them.
It's like getting a straight answer from Bugsy* with you.

Would you care to share who instructed you that:

a) You should keep an empty case in the chamber; and

b) that racking a handgun was a method of deescalation?






*I know; too harsh. I'm sorry.
 

arcticfox042

War Hero
It's like getting a straight answer from Bugsy* with you.

Would you care to share who instructed you that:

a) You should keep an empty case in the chamber; and

b) that racking a handgun was a method of deescalation?






*I know; too harsh. I'm sorry.
What total Bollox........
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Easy to disarm someone if you step in while they have it in a shoulder holster. Wear two holsters, one for seated draw, the other for upright. Scout holster in the back for standing and something similar on the off side while seated should work. Take up little space and easy to transfer unobtrusively, rather than thrashing about under jacket.

When I was in civi clothing and carrying a pistol I didn't have the luxury of being able to use multiple holsters, such as when I was in a civi amulance jump suit, fortunately the holster bulk was generally hidden by the hi vis jacket . Rifles were hidden away inside the ambulance. Several of our trips outside BBK in that thing were escorted (although we lost the escort vehicle one night as they went the wrong way following the wrong ambulance - oh how we laughed as we drove through that red area, at night, during a period of some excitement)

In a lovely place in Africa I didn't know I was going to be armed in civis so wasn't prepared, ended up carrying my pistol in a day sack as there was no way it was going to be a good idea to carry it tucked into my shorts, thankfully we didn't need it.

A very long time ago I ‘lost’ my gat for about 2.5 seconds once when moving out of a LUP where we’d been all night, and then some. In that length of time a couple of still-functioning brain cells figured out that something important was missing, did a complete inventory of all the heavy crap I was supposed to be carrying, concluded it was important, instructed me to break out in the coldest of sweats, visualise the impending charge sheet and calculate the probable discharge after a lifetime of doubling round the square sans cap and belt. I took three paces to the rear, retrieved it just before my bowels were scheduled to open and it never left my clenched hands until prised out of them at the armoury. It never happened again.


I definitely didn't leave my rifle in the ablutions in LKG, or in BSN, only to have one of the civi cleaners find me and ask if I could remove it for them. I was just the first person they found.
I needed another shower after pooing myself over it each time.
 

RTU'd

Old-Salt
This VIP needs protection.
1603287775442.png


Boris likes finding out who are the hotties that could guard him.
1603287875659.png
 

Chef

LE
Our masters must have their Praetorian Guard.

Makes them feel important.

With a bit of luck they might go full Praetorian and appoint new leaders while the old one bleeds out.
 
It's like getting a straight answer from Bugsy* with you.

Would you care to share who instructed you that:

a) You should keep an empty case in the chamber; and

b) that racking a handgun was a method of deescalation?






*I know; too harsh. I'm sorry.

A) No-one. It was a way to prevent inclusions.

B) Because at the time, I was dealing with people who weren't stupid. If required, they'd have an entirely unconnected chap pop along to have a word. The word would have been mostly "ouch".
 
A) No-one. It was a way to prevent inclusions.

B) Because at the time, I was dealing with people who weren't stupid. If required, they'd have an entirely unconnected chap pop along to have a word. The word would have been mostly "ouch".
So you are the sort of totally untrained mong who I would kick off a range in about two seconds and wouldn't leave in charge of a water pistol.

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