Police persue suspect to Mosque-and then pause!

#1
The Times reports today,on a Manchester based British man,subject to a Control Order,who is thought to have left his accomodation,and fled to a local mosque,shortly after the Order was granted.He is now thought to be 'abroad'

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2551251,00.html

It appears that while police 'sought' to enter the mosque,the man escaped out of a rear door(in a burka?).

My question:Do police observe such tactics when chasing suspects in all religious buildings in UK ,or just Mosques?
 
#2
Please consider this mans religious and human rights!
 
#3
Unfortunately, with the continual ramming down their throats of "RFD" (that's Respect For Diversity, folks) the average copper is quite probably sh*t-scared of offending any member of a minority, and if they had continued the chase into the mosque you can guarantee that every infidel hater in the nation would be out on his soap-box calling for a Fatwah on the GMP, which no doubt would be supported by the Govt, as a trust building measure between communities.
 
#4
It would seem that 'fatwas' can be issued by any m-mouse muslim cleric.They are often issued by these 'so called' imams,who,themselves,have little formal training.That's 'diversity' for you.No doubt Big Brother will get one,one day!!

Themanwho said:
Unfortunately, with the continual ramming down their throats of "RFD" (that's Respect For Diversity, folks) the average copper is quite probably sh*t-scared of offending any member of a minority, and if they had continued the chase into the mosque you can guarantee that every infidel hater in the nation would be out on his soap-box calling for a Fatwah on the GMP, which no doubt would be supported by the Govt, as a trust building measure between communities.
 
#5
muhandis89 said:
It would seem that 'fatwas' can be issued by any m-mouse muslim cleric.They are often issued by these 'so called' imams,who,themselves,have little formal training.That's 'diversity' for you.No doubt Big Brother will get one,one day!!
think i'm right in saying that a "fatwa" is simply a religious ruling... rather than the western misconception that it is always some sort of incitement to assassinate salman rushdie / kill all white people.

just like jihad (struggle) has many interpretations other than "religious war".
 
#6
Correct.

The trouble is that fatwas can be issued by any Muslin religious leader, be he an intelligent, well educated man or an illiterate, foaming at the mouth nutter.
 
#7
Chinggis said:
Correct.

The trouble is that fatwas can be issued by any Muslin religious leader, be he an intelligent, well educated man or an illiterate, foaming at the mouth nutter.
Mostly I prefer the foaming at the mouth nutters, you know exactly who you are dealing with then...
 
#8
I don't know if it was ever recinded but any person could ask the Church for sanctuary and no other authority could remove them, save the Church itself.

Don't know if it still works, and if it applys to all religouse biulding or not. Would they have been able to chase him in to a church? Would the Vicer of Dibbly given him up?
 
#11
The right of sanctuary within a church has been removed, quite some time ago.
WW
 
#12
Consider my neck to be wound in then.
 
#13
Whilst the right to sanctuary might well have been withdrawn, there have been several cases in Yorkshire of individuals claiming sanctuary in churches and it being respected
 
#14
Glad no-one ever got around to telling the Gerry & Macker club. The 'Right of Sanctuary' saved a few asses in NI in days gone by.
 
#15
yes I agree with that and for the life of me that comes under something I cant remember and applied to a particulr religion.
WW
 
#16
Is it true that government offices and some business offices in the UK have a Prayer Room so that the namaz can be read/ offered during the prescribed time?

How do they hear the aazan? Is there a loudspeaker as is usual on mosques in India and Malaysia?

Can non Moslems also use this room to say their prayers at the same time if they suddenly have to urge to do so? Or is it a Moslem only room?

What good does a prayer room do? Is there any real pressing requirement felt by the Moslems to have a special prayer room? Namaz can be offered anywhere so long they have the kibla and they face Mecca. Even a prayer rug is not necessary.

I am curious to know this since in India, where we have the second largest Moslem population of the world, the Moslems have not asked for special prayer rooms as yet.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#18
bob_lawlaw said:
Glad no-one ever got around to telling the Gerry & Macker club. The 'Right of Sanctuary' saved a few asses in NI in days gone by.
By the time I got there in 83 the right to enter the local arms cote, sorry Corpus Christi, even under hot pursuit was under severe restraint!
 
#19
I see nothing in s17 PACE that prevents me from entering any premises to effect the arrest of offenders, suspected offenders or those unlawfully at large.

Whether my employer would back me up in this, now there's a different matter.

I enjoyed the bit that said the absconding individual didn't pose a danger to the public; so why's he on a control order then?
 
#20
Needle_Point said:
I see nothing in s17 PACE that prevents me from entering any premises to effect the arrest of offenders, suspected offenders or those unlawfully at large.

Whether my employer would back me up in this, now there's a different matter.

I enjoyed the bit that said the absconding individual didn't pose a danger to the public; so why's he on a control order then?
I think the spokesman meant that there is not at the moment a danger to the British public because the suspect is thought to have run abroad.

Anyway, I read the article over lunch today and was frankly amazed at the apparent lack of competence and initiative shown by the policemen on scene. Apparently they had posted men outside but had somehow failed to prevent the man from running away. More than that, I do not see why there is a need to how 'discussions' - after all, a mosque is a public place. More than that, they appeared to have reasonable belief that he was inside, so even if it is private property, I believe PACE allowed them to enter and search to arrest a person for an 'arrestable offence' (which IIRC, the breach of a control order is).

Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, s.17
Entry for purpose of arrest, etc.

17. - (1) Subject to the following provisions of this section, and without prejudice to any other enactment, a constable may enter and search any premises for the purpose -

(a) of executing -
(i) a warrant of arrest issued in connection with or arising out of criminal proceedings; or
(ii) a warrant of commitment issued under section 76 of the Magistrates' Courts Act 1980;
(b) of arresting a person for an arrestable offence;
(c) of arresting a person for an offence under -
(i) section 1 (prohibition of uniforms in connection with political objects), ... of the Public Order Act 1936;
...
(d) of recapturing any person whatsoever who is unlawfully at large and whom he is pursuing; or
...

(2) Except for the purpose specified in paragraph (e) of subsection (1) above, the powers of entry and search conferred by this section -

(a) are only exercisable if the constable has reasonable grounds for believing that the person whom he is seeking is on the premises
; and
(b) are limited, in relation to premises consisting of two or more separate dwellings, to powers to enter and search -
(i) any parts of the premises which the occupiers of any dwelling comprised in the premises use in common with the occupiers of any other such dwelling; and
(ii) any such dwelling in which the constable has reasonable grounds for believing that the person whom he is seeking may be.

...
 

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