Police Officer with a Pace stick?

walrusboy

War Hero
Have never seen this before, he looks like an Inspector, is there a Police rank where Pace sticks are issued/bought?

View attachment 551904
Merseyside Police officers are issued signalling sticks on promotion to sergeant. They are metal tipped and were used historically by Liverpool City Police to strike the ground the call in PCs on nearby beats. If you ever go to the match they are a common sight
 
Merseyside Police officers are issued signalling sticks on promotion to sergeant. They are metal tipped and were used historically by Liverpool City Police to strike the ground the call in PCs on nearby beats. If you ever go to the match they are a common sight


Imagine being regarded as too thick to use a whistle and have to be given something to bang on the ground instead....
 
They got a car to hide in if things get dicey or is that just the met?

Your reputation doesn't last long in a county, or smaller city force if you are a knobber.
 
Imagine being regarded as too thick to use a whistle and have to be given something to bang on the ground instead....

Whistles are for emergencies and not for indicating to a beat copper that you want him to come to you for a chat.
 

Ayatollah

Old-Salt
Whistles are for emergencies and not for indicating to a beat copper that you want him to come to you for a chat.
So Noddies aren't intelligent enough to use a radio.. Hmm leaves a lot of questions about recruitment standards?
 
Merseyside Police officers are issued signalling sticks on promotion to sergeant. They are metal tipped and were used historically by Liverpool City Police to strike the ground the call in PCs on nearby beats. If you ever go to the match they are a common sight
In old episodes of Z cars you see sergeants with signalling sticks pre personal radios
 
I can't help think it's rather rich coming from a community, which has some extremely odd traditions and uniforms, criticising something as innocuous as a stick.

The irony of which, is that those criticizing the community are themselves descended from that community, and indeed a similar, but even older one, with even more odd traditions, if not uniforms.

The bastard-child community could of course disclaim their heritage, which would be fair enough. Every child goes their own way eventually. Yet the bastards chose not to, and date their elder squadrons from the time of original formation, well before Gen Trenchard even thought of the bastards.

Those who live in glass houses... :)
 
The drill sergeant at Hendon was not even a proper sergeant, he was given three stripes by virtue of his role. I'm not even sure that he was a police officer. He may just have been a specially employed civvy. Ours was an ex- Scots Guardsman. His name, I think, was Donnelly.
The drill sergeant at Hendon in 1988 was ex Guards. I thought he was ex WG. He wore full police uniform but I heard that he only got the rank for the job. He seemed a decent bloke.
 
Hmmm ... evokes memories of observing Nepalese and Indian Formed Police Units confronting civil disobedience events: the rank and file were equipped with “lathi”, an approximately 1” thick 6’ long cane tipped with about 5” of lead insert, with which to attract the attention of fore-mentioned civil disobedients, by subtle application to knee-caps or ankles ... other bodily regions are available. During said activities the senior personnel would stand back, aloof, vocally encouraging these subtle applications; theirs is not to overly exert themselves.
I remember an episode of Karachi cops where the plod of Karachi PD arrest a bloke who had been impersonating a police Inspector. They took him to the cells and you could hear the 'whacks' and resulting cries as the suspect is hit on the soles of his feet with lathi's.
 
Merseyside coppers carry them. However can't remember the last time I saw a Sgt out and about.
Think it is called a Staff. There was a famous pic of Police Sgt. at Anfield keeping 30,000 Kopites off the pitch, armed with one of them.
 

walrusboy

War Hero
Think it is called a Staff. There was a famous pic of Police Sgt. at Anfield keeping 30,000 Kopites off the pitch, armed with one of them.
In Merseyside Police a wooden truncheon was known as a staff prior to the introduction of expandable batons and other protective equipment. The signalling stick has always been known as that, or a signalling cane.
 
So Noddies aren't intelligent enough to use a radio.. Hmm leaves a lot of questions about recruitment standards?
Amongst the said cohort of previously mentioned Bobbies, was an Inspector (Lancs) who had run the Blackburn, East Lancs Division.
He got 'promoted' to Bruche Training Centre where Lancs, Gmp and Merseyside pooled their training because of his expertise in policing that areas demographic.
He was somewhat bemused by the pass rate criteria between the three 'Forces' as they were named then ...
I'll let you guess which had the highest entry criteria and which the lowest.

As an aside, he resigned and moved to Spain in the early Noughties, one of his intakes included a 'speshul' type of recruit, innit ,who failed his exams three times...
The word came from above it was imperative he was to pass out, so a whole intake of recruits eventually breezed through.

The fact it occured within a few months of The Macpherson Report being published, was as my mate surmised, just an interesting coincidence.
 

walrusboy

War Hero
Amongst the said cohort of previously mentioned Bobbies, was an Inspector (Lancs) who had run the Blackburn, East Lancs Division.
He got 'promoted' to Bruche Training Centre where Lancs, Gmp and Merseyside pooled their training because of his expertise in policing that areas demographic.
He was somewhat bemused by the pass rate criteria between the three 'Forces' as they were named then ...
I'll let you guess which had the highest entry criteria and which the lowest.

As an aside, he resigned and moved to Spain in the early Noughties, one of his intakes included a 'speshul' type of recruit, innit ,who failed his exams three times...
The word came from above it was imperative he was to pass out, so a whole intake of recruits eventually breezed through.

The fact it occured within a few months of The Macpherson Report being published, was as my mate surmised, just an interesting coincidence.
East Lancs has a relatively high Indian sub-continent heritage population and it is defensible that all communities are represented in line with Peel's seventh principle of policing. Some of these recruits might struggle with the academic side of training, particularly if English is not the first language spoken at home and it is reasonable that additional training be given to help them meet the quality line.

These adjustments are not new. The RUC and PSNI used to have recruit intakes comprising equal numbers from both sides of the sectarian divide. This was in order to secure the confidence of the Catholic population and follows sound counter-insurgency doctrine, although I'm not sure how successful it was.

As regards the Force pass rates for entry into Bruche, it was pretty much identical. A pass in the national police entrance exam (pre-assessment centres) was the academic quality line, notwithstanding you might get stay-behind graduates in major cities like Liverpool and Manchester which spiked the graduate intake in city Forces. There were slight differences in eyesight and height requirements across the region and Cheshire Constabulary required successful completion of an outward bound weekend but the overall quality line was the same. As a matter of interest the minimum height requirement ended to 'level the playing field' for BAME candidates as there was some evidence to indicate that some BAME groups were, on average, shorter than white males.
 
I assumed that Bruche was just a training centre. I went there first in 1995 when I joined NWP. We did two stints there, with training in between taken in force. We were there with GMP, Lancs, Humberside, W Yorks and N Yorks. I assume the other forces weren’t recruiting at the time.
It was impressed on us NWP (in force) that this was just a minor inconvenience to be borne and nothing much would come of it, but the HO made us do it. My tutor Constable worked me harder than Bruche ever did.
Anyway, we had a bloke with a pace stick for the ultimately futile shambles that was the final parade. He also had a role as a PTI, IIRC.
A waste of time and effort. One woman in my group was a theology graduate. Smart, funny and tough. But the silly drill lessons gave her what we would call these days anxiety. And a chance for bloke with pace stick to shout.
Never quite worked out if this bloke with the pace stick was a copper, or an ex-RPC LCpl with issues.
Did I also mention it was a complete waste of time?
 

The_Poltroon

Old-Salt
I assumed that Bruche was just a training centre. I went there first in 1995 when I joined NWP. We did two stints there, with training in between taken in force. We were there with GMP, Lancs, Humberside, W Yorks and N Yorks. I assume the other forces weren’t recruiting at the time.
It was impressed on us NWP (in force) that this was just a minor inconvenience to be borne and nothing much would come of it, but the HO made us do it. My tutor Constable worked me harder than Bruche ever did.
Anyway, we had a bloke with a pace stick for the ultimately futile shambles that was the final parade. He also had a role as a PTI, IIRC.
A waste of time and effort. One woman in my group was a theology graduate. Smart, funny and tough. But the silly drill lessons gave her what we would call these days anxiety. And a chance for bloke with pace stick to shout.
Never quite worked out if this bloke with the pace stick was a copper, or an ex-RPC LCpl with issues.
Did I also mention it was a complete waste of time?
Cwmbran made Bruche look like Hurawalhi Island Resort in the Maldives
 

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