Police officer tried to hang himself from lamp-post' outside force HQ.

#21
@Boumer

I was talking to a lad from Gwent police that I know quite well. They are haemarraging officers rather badly.

Young keen probationary constables binning the job after 9 months due to the obscene workload and lack of support.
 
#22
@Boumer

I was talking to a lad from Gwent police that I know quite well. They are haemarraging officers rather badly.

Young keen probationary constables binning the job after 9 months due to the obscene workload and lack of support.
how sad.jpeg


Best those bright thrusting minds that call themselves leaders get a plan then.

Other than locking themselves in the car until it is all over, I mean.
 
#24
Unfortunately, no substantial new money or resources are on the horizon any time soon. Things are only going to continue to decline or at best stay as they are. Demand is rapidly increasing with workloads escalating. Check out the new crime figures which are out today.
 
#25
@wetsmonkey

What, these stats?
Screenshot_20181019-070311.jpg


And I think those are the ones adjusted to take out statistical anomalies like terrorist attacks.

Mate, get with the winning team.

The rise is due to -

A) better recording,
B) increases public confidence in reporting to police.
C) some other clever specious rubbish I can't think of right now due to a hangover.

If does not represent a rise in steady crime rise under successive glorious leaders, and more can be done with less.
 
#26
@Boumer - The is a lot to your option B - "B) increases public confidence in reporting to police."

When I was at Kennedy School one of my classmates was a UK cop, (Kent Police ) After returning to the UK, becoming a DCI and got a D.Phil.. He returned to Harvard as a faculty member and did a lot of research on just that phenomenon. Apparently any publicity of police success against any type of crime increases reporting of that crime. The increased reporting does cause an uptick in the stats but indicates that the police are doing their job.
 
#27
@Boumer - The is a lot to your option B - "B) increases public confidence in reporting to police."

When I was at Kennedy School one of my classmates was a UK cop, (Kent Police ) After returning to the UK, becoming a DCI and got a D.Phil.. He returned to Harvard as a faculty member and did a lot of research on just that phenomenon. Apparently any publicity of police success against any type of crime increases reporting of that crime. The increased reporting does cause an uptick in the stats but indicates that the police are doing their job.

it may well be true (and when I did real policing and worked sexual assault cases, an increase in reported sexual offences was perhasp due to the presence of a specialist team).

But, as I may have said before on this site; You've only got a drugs problem, when you've got a drugs squad. If you go an find things, they become statistically signifcant. These statistics can't be ignored, as due to prioritisation due to lack of resources I would imagine police respond to violent crime over non-violent matters.

Anyway, It's also the standard line trotted out by senior police to try and pacify the Home Office.

And you don't get promoted telling people what they don't want to hear.
 
#29
@wetsmonkey

What, these stats? View attachment 358135

And I think those are the ones adjusted to take out statistical anomalies like terrorist attacks.

Mate, get with the winning team.

The rise is due to -

A) better recording,
B) increases public confidence in reporting to police.
C) some other clever specious rubbish I can't think of right now due to a hangover.

If does not represent a rise in steady crime rise under successive glorious leaders, and more can be done with less.
And only 8.7% of all recorded crimes result in a Summons or Charge. Indeed, in almost half of recorded incidents - 46.6% - no suspect is even identified before the investigation is closed.

Still, at least we keep dangerous hate preachers locked up where they can't pose a security risk by inspiring terror attacks...

Oh, wait:(
 

MrBane

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#30
Would be interesting to see how TRIM was applied with him if he'd had operational issues previously.
I'm a TRIM assessor. It's routinely applied far too late, not at all, or in a half arsed fashion.

Two I did, both were basically on the verge of topping themselves after what they'd seen. One was going home to an empty house each night and drinking themselves to sleep.

Horrendous how it's still not being done right.
 
#31
My stepson has just announced he's considering joining the police after he finishes college.

Im going to show him this thread.
I think that would be a wise thing to do. Even now after many years I still find it mentally painful to discuss these things, so don't. Over the years, two of my colleagues ( and friends) topped themselves. One by firing himself with petrol as he had been on desk duty for about four years and they decided to put him back out into an unpleasant area and on a response team at the age of 50 years.

I need to emphasise that these were strong, tough, decent characters. An earlier poster implied it was a build up over years of pressure and maybe frustration that does it with a final thing that causes the snap. I can only concur.

That was a long time ago. If anything, things seem far worse now. If your boy has the ability to do anything else, he should do that instead. Just my opinion.
 
#32
I've transferred out of the MET in the last few months to another force.

This job one involves a lot of trains.

The grass is not greener at all, just different situations and a more select collection of crimes to deal with.

85% of My new colleagues are less than 3 years service or probationers and few are anticipating being in the job for much longer. They are heavily loaded with investigations to try and work through, but also under immense pressure to be physically out walking the network ( like the paymasters are actually paying for )and until a new emergency restructure, were spending months if not YEARS working alone on shifts.

####### SPOILER ######

##### Nikki, do not read the next paragraph####

Thats for the wife who likes reading ARRSE.

A few weeks ago, in a dark tunnel, lit by flashlights, I was picking up the scattered spinal column and skull,brain and assorted bits of a chap who failed to outrun a train and putting him into a small selection of yellow bio-bags.As I was walking out to get my boots steam cleaned,I was informed by a well dressed city chap that he was being delayed yet again and as a shareholder he was f##king disgusted that the police were doing bugger all apart from milling about and shutting stations at random. The most thanks I received in months to be honest.

I would suggest that no-person should even think about applying to join the police until they do a substantial amount of research about the impact on your family life, social, the unavoidable changes to your mental health and the constantly topping up to the meter that regards the general public as an alien species Ideally to go out on a patrol as a member of the public ( most forces will do this ) just to experience the utter hatred and malice from even normal people whom have been told to try and behave like a normal human being ( at least until they leave the station )
 
#33
Part of the problem here in the US is that all officers carry guns and some decide to eat the gun. Officers with mental or substance abuse issues have guns removed and can only work in a police station filing forms etc.

Part of the problem is that once upon a time officers regarded themselves as a band of brothers and tried to support their brothers. Now the superiors seem to worry about meeting productivity guidelines and ensuring all is politically correct. I recall a friend who was discouraged with work. He had had a very busy week with 4 felony arrests including rapist and a bank robber on the most wanted list. The police chief called him into his office and my friend expected to hear "Great Work Jimmy, the department is proud of you" Instead the chief had noticed that he had only written one traffic ticket that week and his productivity was declining.

I did hear that on your side of the pond, as a terrorist was stabbing a constable to death outside Parliament that the Deputy Commissioner was 5 yards away and responded by locking the car doors and ordering his driver to leave rapidly. Brother?? Brother my are!! That deputy is a disgrace to the uniform in my book.
This like this would tend to get to the officers.
Here in NI I knew two people, One RUC and One UDR, who killed themselves with with their PPWs.
 
#34
I've transferred out of the MET in the last few months to another force.

This job one involves a lot of trains.

The grass is not greener at all, just different situations and a more select collection of crimes to deal with.

85% of My new colleagues are less than 3 years service or probationers and few are anticipating being in the job for much longer. They are heavily loaded with investigations to try and work through, but also under immense pressure to be physically out walking the network ( like the paymasters are actually paying for )and until a new emergency restructure, were spending months if not YEARS working alone on shifts.

####### SPOILER ######

##### Nikki, do not read the next paragraph####

Thats for the wife who likes reading ARRSE.

A few weeks ago, in a dark tunnel, lit by flashlights, I was picking up the scattered spinal column and skull,brain and assorted bits of a chap who failed to outrun a train and putting him into a small selection of yellow bio-bags.As I was walking out to get my boots steam cleaned,I was informed by a well dressed city chap that he was being delayed yet again and as a shareholder he was f##king disgusted that the police were doing bugger all apart from milling about and shutting stations at random. The most thanks I received in months to be honest.

I would suggest that no-person should even think about applying to join the police until they do a substantial amount of research about the impact on your family life, social, the unavoidable changes to your mental health and the constantly topping up to the meter that regards the general public as an alien species Ideally to go out on a patrol as a member of the public ( most forces will do this ) just to experience the utter hatred and malice from even normal people whom have been told to try and behave like a normal human being ( at least until they leave the station )
NODUFF I have nothing but admiration for your self-control.
 
#35
NODUFF I have nothing but admiration for your self-control.
Unfortunately you can have self control for decades in the face of extreme provocation and then make one mistake or crack under pressure and respond incorrectly and you will be shafted.
You might be prosecuted, if that fails then the discipline route will be followed with your career raked over to find something or other if they can’t get you for the initial thing.
You will then be sacked, placed on a public discipline register and have to explain that every time you apply for a job.
 
#36
Couple the shit job prospects & lack of management support when needed, when, as DS with a few years under your belt & an A level education, you can get yourself into a mid-level management role in the private sector for the same money if not more. Steady hours, good packages. Whats not to like?
Cousin of mine did 25 years with Merseyside left as a DS & now works as a consultant for a specialist recruitment coy, chasing serving & recent ex-blokes & lasses for roles in the security sector. The relatively recent crowded places initiative by the govt got the larger private sector companies into a risk averse tail spin for some reason so roles opened up in a lot of places.
 
#38
I've transferred out of the MET in the last few months to another force.

This job one involves a lot of trains.

The grass is not greener at all, just different situations and a more select collection of crimes to deal with.

85% of My new colleagues are less than 3 years service or probationers and few are anticipating being in the job for much longer. They are heavily loaded with investigations to try and work through, but also under immense pressure to be physically out walking the network ( like the paymasters are actually paying for )and until a new emergency restructure, were spending months if not YEARS working alone on shifts.

####### SPOILER ######

##### Nikki, do not read the next paragraph####

Thats for the wife who likes reading ARRSE.

A few weeks ago, in a dark tunnel, lit by flashlights, I was picking up the scattered spinal column and skull,brain and assorted bits of a chap who failed to outrun a train and putting him into a small selection of yellow bio-bags.As I was walking out to get my boots steam cleaned,I was informed by a well dressed city chap that he was being delayed yet again and as a shareholder he was f##king disgusted that the police were doing bugger all apart from milling about and shutting stations at random. The most thanks I received in months to be honest.

I would suggest that no-person should even think about applying to join the police until they do a substantial amount of research about the impact on your family life, social, the unavoidable changes to your mental health and the constantly topping up to the meter that regards the general public as an alien species Ideally to go out on a patrol as a member of the public ( most forces will do this ) just to experience the utter hatred and malice from even normal people whom have been told to try and behave like a normal human being ( at least until they leave the station )
Why didn't you open the bag and invite him to look inside ?
He might have been reassured his money was well spent.
 
#39
Good buddy of mine, has been in the force around a decade.....she is under a lot of pressure and unfortunately fallen into some of the aforementioned drawbacks of the profession. And yes I believe she has been signed off for stress etc. Safe to say she has no support at work and around the time of her parents funeral recently the only comunique from the inspector was a stern warning reminding her that she could be on thin ice if she doesnt ace the annual PT test .

If that is not the case I heard from one of her relatives (former firefighter) that he and his colleagues attended major RTA on some road. Only for the incident commanders (both police inspectors) bickering between themselves about who was in charge/ petty swearing at each other thus holding up the response to cut folk free, (thankfully no one had died)

Cheers
 
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#40
Good buddy of mine, has been in the force around a decade.....she is under a lot of pressure and unfortunately fallen into some of the aforementioned drawbacks. And yes I believe she has been signed off for stress etc. Safe to say she has no support at work and around the time of her parents funeral recently the only comunique from the inspector was a stern warning reminding her that she could be on thin ice if she doesnt ace the annual PT test ,
Cheers
Support networks - be it at work or personal, are the key to staying sane. Unfortunately, due to various circumstances not always possible. I am a good example.
 

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