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Police officer tried to hang himself from lamp-post' outside force HQ.

#1
As you might have heard, a lad from Cheshire Constabulary recently tried to hang himself from a lamppost outside Ches Pol HQ.

Absolutely shit to hear. The amount of bobbies suffering with mental ill health is ridiculous.

The lad was quickly rescued by fellow officers and taken to hospital where his condition was described as stable. Shocked colleagues described him as a “really nice lad” and sadly, this indicates how common it is for sufferers to appear fine.

I know it’s a cliche but f*ck it. If you fear an oppo or someone close to you is suffering in silence, don’t flap.

It can be daunting to approach someone who is struggling to cope and you may not know what to say, how to start a difficult conversation or worry that you'll make things worse. However, you don’t need to be an expert. Often, just asking if someone's OK and letting them know you're listening can give people the confidence to open up about how they're feeling.

Reminds me- it is worth highlighting a fantastic charity I had dealings with through work : SOBS Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide.

It’s a charity dedicated to overcoming the isolation and supporting those who have lost a loved one to suicide. Might be useful to promote.
 
#3
Would be interesting to see how TRIM was applied with him if he'd had operational issues previously.
Good point.

From experience there has been continued investment in Wellbeing and forces have been granted funding to provide more TRiM practitioners.

It’s open to all officers and civvie staff who believe they have the correct attributes.

Paper sift, then interview followed by a two day pass/fail practitioners course where their ability to deliver the TRiM process will be continually monitored by force leads.

All cop TRiM practitioners must be available to be deploy 24/7. Especially in a major incident so it limits the likes of firearms,
casualty Bureau/FLO/DVI from throwing their hat in the ring as in the event of a major incident they would be required to complete their day job in the first instance.
 
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#4
I wonder what he was suspended for.............
Come on, this isn't the NAAFI.

Sometimes it's not a specific operational event - the job is relentless pressure. Simply having too much to do and no time to do it might have been the trigger for this poor chap. There are support set ups from the job and outside but as the OP suggests, the best early warning system is those around you. I hope this chap is better soon.
 
#5
A drinking buddy of mine is Cheshire and we were chatting recently in this. The only surprise is it’s not happened before which is a dreadful state of affairs.

I know nothing of policing other than chatting to a mate but another cliche, thanks for looking out for my safety.
 
#6
Come on, this isn't the NAAFI.

Sometimes it's not a specific operational event - the job is relentless pressure. Simply having too much to do and no time to do it might have been the trigger for this poor chap. There are support set ups from the job and outside but as the OP suggests, the best early warning system is those around you. I hope this chap is better soon.
A good friend of mine who's an ex Sapper was with Gwent police. All I can say is that if people were aware of the mental health issues that were cropping up, why couldn't those he was working with see it.
He's ok now, got his issues sorted out with the help of RBL. But his wife fully expected to come home and find he'd taken his own life.

Absolutely Zero support from Gwent police, if anything supervising officers put him under even more pressure rather than helping the bloke.

I hope the copper in Cheshire gets the help he needs and that systems are put in place to prevent it happening again.
 
#7
A good friend of mine who's an ex Sapper was with Gwent police. All I can say is that if people were aware of the mental health issues that were cropping up, why couldn't those he was working with see it.
He's ok now, got his issues sorted out with the help of RBL. But his wife fully expected to come home and find he'd taken his own life.

Absolutely Zero support from Gwent police, if anything supervising officers put him under even more pressure rather than helping the bloke.

I hope the copper in Cheshire gets the help he needs and that systems are put in place to prevent it happening again.
As one colleague put it "How did I celebrate the end of my probation? - I took a month off with stress!" I think he was joking, but it can get to you. A few weeks back a combination of excessive workload, a couple of bad sleeps and a slight bug meant that just after the start of an evening shift my body simply shut down and I had to come home - I basically slept for 4 days. This can happen in any job, agreed, and my new location is better than before [I moved to reduce my commute] but there are stations where everyone seems to be on the edge of collapse and that is not ideal.

I have a pal who is a great copper, the one time I put out an 'assistance' call he was there at the speed of light and he really knows his stuff. Two months ago he was seriously assaulted and spat at full in the face - he has been off since and now he's leaving, he's simply had enough.
 
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#8
As one colleague put it "How did I celebrate the end of my probation? - I took a month off with stress!" I think he was joking, but it can get to you. A few weeks back a combination of excessive workload, a couple of bad sleeps and a slight bug meant that just after the start of an evening shift my body simply shut down and I had to come home - I basically slept for 4 days. This can happen in any job, agreed, and my new location is better than before [I moved to reduce my commute] but there are stations where everyone seems to be on the edge of collapse and that is not ideal.

I have a pal who is a great copper, the one time I put out an 'assistance' call he was there at the speed of light and he really knows his stuff. Two months ago he was seriously assaulted and spat at full in the face - he has been off since and now he's leaving, he's simply had enough.
I never suffered with that, luckily. A very good mate of mine was the county bike god and in between courses he used to do ordinary traffic duty on the bike. He ended up being the bloke who used to get to fatal traffic incidents first and built up a vast expertise in dealing with said incidents. As a result of that experience and reputation when he was out and about if there was a fatal then control would task him to it.

It took its toll on him having to sort out the accidents, working in and around an effective road traffic warzone. He never went on a bender, or tried to top himself but, every so often he used to unload when we went for a sunday morning ride out - grown man crying.

I also knew a lovely female DC, married, looks, clever with a good future ahead of her, one of those people who always had a smile on her face and time for everyone. She went out to a nature spot and topped herself by sticking a hose on the exhaust and into the car. No one but, no one, saw that coming - not shagging around, always up to date with her workload, liked by everyone.
 
#9
I hope the poor chap makes a full recovery.

Long hours spent dealing with a violent, feral underclass who have no respect for the law and those who have to enforce it. Daily situations that range from unpleasant to emotionally scarring to life-threatening. Poor pay, given what the job entails, and worse terms and conditions. Little support from senior officers or politicians. Dwindling respect from law abiding citizens who feel abandoned and let down...

Good luck to anyone who wants to be a copper but, with respect, I'd question their sanity.
 
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#10
If you closed your eyes and threw a dart into a room of response officers receiving a briefing you are almost certain to hit one that has a history of work-related psychological illness.
Such as PTSD, stress, anxiety and depression.

There are shortcomings and failings in the system. Most noticeably, there are insufficient resources, too few professionals, a dreadful lack of awareness and a certain indifference.

Oh and throwing a dart into the briefing room would ironically get you time off much quicker...
 
#11
If you closed your eyes and threw a dart into a room of response officers receiving a briefing you are almost certain to hit one that has a history of work-related psychological illness.
Such as PTSD, stress, anxiety and depression.

There are shortcomings and failings in the system. Most noticeably, there are insufficient resources, too few professionals, a dreadful lack of awareness and a certain indifference.

Oh and throwing a dart into the briefing room would ironically get you time off much quicker...
You'd be lucky to hit anyone in our briefing, there are that few of us.
 
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#12
If you closed your eyes and threw a dart into a room of response officers receiving a briefing you are almost certain to hit one that has a history of work-related psychological illness.
Such as PTSD, stress, anxiety and depression.

There are shortcomings and failings in the system. Most noticeably, there are insufficient resources, too few professionals, a dreadful lack of awareness and a certain indifference.

Oh and throwing a dart into the briefing room would ironically get you time off much quicker...
Apologies, mate, I know this Thread is about an extremely serious subject. But I still have to ask: is this you? ;)

police-medic-police-riot-demotivational-poster-1259267024.jpg
 
#13
Three out of fifteen rubber-roomed from our team for months on end, one will never hold down any employment ever again, two eventually came back. A couple more have had odd funny turns requiring just a day or two to put their head straight. Some lie and ask for annual leave, not reporting sick. The "more for less" expectations of them takes its toll, along with the swingeing discipline if they fail in the slightest.
 
#15
I met up with a load of old mates at last years A v N match. Most are Bobbies in various forces and to a man, they were counting down how long they had left before retiring. Made me glad I binned the idea after I left the Army.

Best wishes to the PC concerned, and anyone else who is suffering because of work stress.
 
#16
Being Cheshire Constabulary I wonder if the toxic environment cultured by their ex Chief Constable (currently under investigation), trickled downwards and outwards?
 
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#19

Part of the problem here in the US is that all officers carry guns and some decide to eat the gun. Officers with mental or substance abuse issues have guns removed and can only work in a police station filing forms etc.

Part of the problem is that once upon a time officers regarded themselves as a band of brothers and tried to support their brothers. Now the superiors seem to worry about meeting productivity guidelines and ensuring all is politically correct. I recall a friend who was discouraged with work. He had had a very busy week with 4 felony arrests including rapist and a bank robber on the most wanted list. The police chief called him into his office and my friend expected to hear "Great Work Jimmy, the department is proud of you" Instead the chief had noticed that he had only written one traffic ticket that week and his productivity was declining.

I did hear that on your side of the pond, as a terrorist was stabbing a constable to death outside Parliament that the Deputy Commissioner was 5 yards away and responded by locking the car doors and ordering his driver to leave rapidly. Brother?? Brother my are!! That deputy is a disgrace to the uniform in my book.
This like this would tend to get to the officers.
 
#20
My stepson has just announced he's considering joining the police after he finishes college.

Im going to show him this thread.
I would not encourage children or friends to join.

Feel free to PM me for a blunt and honest assessment, and I had a good and interesting career.

A powerful memory for me, I think I was in my first ten weeks in the job when I met a PC who'd recently tried to hang himself.

I've have mates go ill from PTSD, depression and stress. The sole input appeared to be backside covering meetings with Occ Health and a persistent requirement to come back as soon as possible.

Despite routine exposure to graphic sexually disturbing material over 18 months, I had no support. No wonder my sense of humour is a little odd (those who actually know me on here will confirm I can be a little dark at times). We'll skip the routine dead bodies and bits I had to pick up, that was just normal jogging (well, I thought it was normal anyway).

In Officer Safety Training, during my last couple of years there was messaging that if you went sick - your mates had to pick up the slack.

I always felt like asking why the bosses didn't come out of their ivory tower and help.

I hope the officer recovers and gets help. Yet, I assess with high confidence this will be portrayed as an individual failure rather than the systemic problem which it is.

Mid career resignation stats for the met are apparently being burried, since they show that what would have been expected to be double figures in the time periods - is hitting triple.

Retired mates of mine are getting letters asking them to come back, especially experienced detective officers.

They've told the job to go f*ck itself. Draw your own conclusions.
 

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