Police officer dies in training accident

#1
BBC News

A police officer has died after suffering a gunshot wound to the chest in a training exercise in Manchester.
Hopefully there is a reasonable explanation for this. Knowing the preperation and control that Military live firing exercises have I would hope that the Police forces have similar rules/safety parctices.
 
#3
I'm assuming it was a tragic accident.

There is no substitution for LFTT in the military world, and i assume its the same for the coppers. Accidents happen and people occasionally die during LFTT. As long as all the procedures were followed then its just one of those things.
 
#4
There was a thread indicating that the police bump each other off at far too regular an interval. Will this be the level of competence demonstrated if all police are routinely armed?

Apparently the police were doing exercises with live ammunition, although there were not meant to be any weapons discharged on the exercise.


BBC News will be transmitting the news conference live in a couple of minutes.
 
#5
Sven said:
Apparently the police were doing exercises with live ammunition, although there were not meant to be any weapons discharged on the exercise.
Really? Then why have weapons in condition 1?
Either way, the RCO has got to be shitting himself.
 
#8
RIP.

Anyone who tries to use this tragic accident to score points against Armed Plod is guilty of seriously bad form... :evil:
 
#9
The guy may not have been military, but he still wore the Queens uniform, R.I.P. and condolences to the family.
 
#11
please for crying out loud let's find out what happened before slating the Police (again). I know first hand that the amount of training daily for firearms officers nationally is colossal, and actually the record for accidents, fatal or no is good. The Police is NOT the Army - I am a product of both and believe me thay are poles apart. Thoughts and massive symapthy to the family.
 
#12
While not trying to detract from this sad loss, radio 4 reported that the site used for this training was being used with no knowledge of the local community.

I find it somewhat strange that effectively a shooting range could be created without any public knowledge, and could potentially have resulted in a member of the public becoming a victim. Irrespective of whether live weapons training was intended, it clearly has happened, and tragically somebody has lost his life as aresult.
 
#13
bobthedog said:
While not trying to detract from this sad loss, radio 4 reported that the site used for this training was being used with no knowledge of the local community.

I find it somewhat strange that effectively a shooting range could be created without any public knowledge, and could potentially have resulted in a member of the public becoming a victim. Irrespective of whether live weapons training was intended, it clearly has happened, and tragically somebody has lost his life as aresult.
There is no way that the site was being used as a range officially.

edited to add the word officially
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#14
Update from the mail
A policeman shot dead during a routine training exercise has tonight been named as Ian James Terry from Burnley.

The 25-year-old, is believed to have been shot in the chest by a fellow officer in a tragic accident.
The married officer suffered horrendous chest wounds and was rushed to hospital where he was later pronounced dead.
Detectives gather to investigate how a police officer was shot dead during a routine training exercise

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) has confirmed it is investigating the shooting and are examining the events leading up to the tragedy.
One senior source said: 'All hell has broken out here and no-one can understand how this dreadful mix-up has happened.

'Officers are never issued with live rounds if they are going to be pointing guns at each other - live ammunition is only used during target practice or an active operation. This has obviously been a mistake of tragic proportions.'


The shooting happened at 11.35am this morning at a huge disused warehouse, a former distribution centre for electronic giant, Sharp.

During the training exercise the officer is believed to have collapsed to the ground after being shot by a fellow officer.

Another senior police source said: 'Officers may have been issued with live ammunition for target practice but but live ammunition is never used in a training exercise such as this as it is simply too dangerous. Instead all officers should have been issued with blank rounds.

'There are all sorts of precautions in place to prevent this type of thing and I am astonished it could have happened.'

Forensic officers swamped the scene and were last night examining four parked cars taped off from the rest of the warehouse yard.

One of the cars, a grey Citroen Xsara, appeared to have its front passenger window smashed and the driver's door was open as was the door to a Suzuki Vitara parked in front.


Acting chief constable Dave Whatton refused to confirm reports the officers should have been using blank rounds
A bulletproof jacket, oxygen mask, police helmets and a yellow jacket were on the ground close to the cars in the yard.

Home Secretary Jacqui Smith expressed her 'deepest sympathy' to the family of the police officer and said it represented the dangers faced by them.

She told the Commons: 'The whole House will be saddened to learn of the tragic death today of a police officer during a training exercise with Greater Manchester Police.

'This demonstrates the dangers that police officers face on our behalf. I am sure that the whole House will join with me in expressing our deepest sympathy to the officer's family, friends and colleagues.'

Acting chief constable Dave Whatton refused to confirm claims the officers should have been using blank rounds.

He said: 'We always carry out firearms training in the safest way possible. There are occasions when we use a variety of ammunition including paintballs and stun guns. Occasionally there are types of training which we can't do in a confined training range.

'We will in due course make known what can be known about the incident. One of the things we are looking at is what ammunition and anything else was being used but we can't comment at this time.'

Police have occasionally used the warehouse for training purposes since the centre closed down a few years ago.

The tragic death comes just days after Greater Manchester Police launched a new £6.5million programme to tackle gun crime.

The high level police crackdown on firearms crime between rival gangs comes after a series of fatal shootings in the city.

A special task force has been set up to deal with the scourge of the shootings after 60 people were shot dead in nine years.

In May last year a police call centre worker was shot in the chest during a 'firearms awareness' training session at the Thames Valley Police headquarters in Kidlington, Oxfordshire.

PC David Micklethwaite accidentally shot Keith Tilbury with a high-powered Magnum revolver as horrified colleagues watched on. Civilian worker Mr Tilbury survived when the bullet passed through his body narrowly missing vital organs.

Last night, David Dyson, a barrister who has been working in gun law for 25 years, said live ammunition should never be used in a training environment.

He said: 'A live weapon should never be pointed at anyone, especially during routine training. It sounds as though they have been acting out a situation - if that is the case then a loaded firearm should never have been used.

'When the army does training exercises they always put a yellow muzzle over their rifles to show their weapon is not loaded.

'I have never heard of any incidents like this happening - it should be almost impossible to get shot during the exercises. There should never be a situation where a live weapon is pointed at colleagues during an exercise.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...dead-training-exercise-disused-warehouse.html
 
#15
Quote,,
""Anyone who tries to use this tragic accident to score points against Armed Plod is guilty of seriously bad form""
Perhaps..
Anyone who uses the Death of a policeman to surpress public comment is also guilty..
 
#16
Sven said:
There was a thread indicating that the police bump each other off at far too regular an interval. Will this be the level of competence demonstrated if all police are routinely armed?
Apparently the police were doing exercises with live ammunition, although there were not meant to be any weapons discharged on the exercise.


BBC News will be transmitting the news conference live in a couple of minutes.
C0CK!!!!!!!!!!!!

What would you know..... :roll:

To put this into perspective, and I can only surmise here it looks like the GMP SFO's were conducting a tactic that is regularly practised , not only in training areas such as disused wharehouses but on the streets on 'live' jobs. I have discharged rounds in such training tactics and 'live' on jobs to detain criminals.
I wont divulge the tactic for obvious OPSEC reasons. But suffice to say I believe they would have been using Shotguns with hatton or RIP frangible rounds. basically a compressed lead powder round that will breach the desired object then rapidly dissipate. Still it would do a person serious damage at close range.
Oh and the so called senior officers comments are a load of tosh, Live rounds are issued all the time during training......Yet again a load of b0llocks spread by the media... :roll: :roll:
RIP the officer and my thoughts are with his family.... :cry:
 
#17
Last night, David Dyson, a barrister who has been working in gun law for 25 years, said live ammunition should never be used in a training environment.

'When the army does training exercises they always put a yellow muzzle over their rifles to show their weapon is not loaded.
don’t you just love idiots who have a little knowledge and speak with authority.

RIP
 
#18
RIP Sir. Lots of us bleat about them in blue. But those guys and gals face chavs clowns every day and are not allowed to klub them.
Respect and condolences for the family. If we can help in any way... we will.
 
#19
I understand it was a shotgun wound to the chest.
Police normally use shotguns for tyres or hinges, and the media report, that there are cars involved would suggest it was an exercise that involved disabling the tyres.

If anyone can design a 'blank' Hatton round, please let me know.
 
#20
A sad tale on any level. Story is fuzzy (no surprise there) but our man collected something moving fast out of a 12g at close range.

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/s/1053296_shot_cop_was_playing_criminal

"A POLICE officer shot dead by a colleague was playing the role of a fleeing criminal during a training exercise.

Pc Ian Terry, 32, was hit in the chest in the grounds of a disused warehouse in Newton Heath. He was rushed to hospital but was already dead.

The M.E.N. can reveal that he was not wearing body armour when he was hit. He is the first police officer to be accidentally shot dead for 58 years.

It is understood that Pc Terry, from Burnley, was a passenger in a stationary Suzuki Vitara, playing the role of a criminal in a getaway car cornered by armed police.

He was shot by a so-called "R.I.P. round", a cartridge which releases a blast of gas at high pressure. It can be used for stopping cars.

A colleague in the firearms unit, who was outside the Vitara, opened fire through the window.

It is not clear whether the officer was aiming at the vehicle or if the gun was fired accidentally.

The incident was captured on CCTV and was being reviewed today.

Pc Terry was a well respected member of the firearms unit who worked undercover.

He had been a firearms officer since 2002 and had joined the police in 1997.

He was married with two children, aged two and four.

Pc Terry also had a brother who is a serving police officer.

The tragedy happened in the grounds of the former Sharp Electronics distribution centre on Thorpe Road. The Independent Police Complaints Commission is investigating the tragedy.

The Health and Safety Executive is also expected to launch an inquiry. The officer who fired the shot is expected to be suspended today, in line with procedure.

The investigations will look at whether appropriate risk assessment, planning and training was carried out before the exercise and whether any senior officers were culpable.

Uniformed police were last night guarding the site, which Sharp moved out of a few years ago. Officers who witnessed the tragedy have been offered counselling.

Firearms officers sometimes use derelict or disused buildings to practice techniques impossible to try out on the force firing range.

Acting chief constable Dave Whatton said: "Occasionally, there are types of training we can't do in a firing range environment."

He said the training exercise had taken place `completely away from any members of the public, involving experienced firearms officers'.

He said: "There was no risk to any members of the public, no one else was hurt during the incident and there is a full investigation taking place involving the coroner, Greater Manchester Police's professional standards officers, the Independent Police Complaints Commission and the Health and Safety Executive.

"Everybody from Greater Manchester Police is devastated with the loss of a highly regarded colleague and friend to many officers in the Greater Manchester force."

"The most important thing is we secure all the evidence. As you can imagine, there are a lot of very, very devastated colleagues and friends."
 

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