Police gone soft?

Sadly, given his testimony to the inquiry, I strongly suspect he has already managed to convince himself he did nothing wrong.
Senior met 'leadership ' has long been impervious to external reality.
 
I wish that I could give you more than one like for this post mate.
We had an incident at work, on sunday, that resulted in a close work friend of mine, being knocked unconcious by a con. I wasn't there, but from what I was told, two new officers failed to respond to his whistle call for assistance.
Their cards are now well and truly marked.
One who walked in the other direction when a mate was subjected to the worst assault on staff that anyone can remember finally resigned yesterday.
Good riddance.
A good baton strike from him wouldn’t have prevented it completely, but it wouldn’t have led to my mate asking me “am I going to die” as he was placed into the ambulance.
Some new staff have not got what it takes to work in a prison environment.
 
There's an article today in the Paper That Shall Not be Named by an ex-Chief Super called Philip Flower, which is a slightly more polite version of what has appeared in these pages.

"As a former police officer who served for 32 years, latterly as a Chief Superintendent. it saddens me to say it but the former Acting Head of the Metropolitan Police Service, Sir Craig Mackey, is guilty of cowardice".
 
Coppers were searching for a bloke in my street today. The dog handler was there, and the Land Shark was a huge German Shepherd, with fur as black as a politician's soul. The last time I saw something that big and hairy, it was co-piloting the Millennium Falcon.

I don't know what effect it had on the bloke they were looking for, but by Christ it scared me!
Fanny!
 
This picture was in the press today , apparently doing the rounds in the police force. There is a lot of anger amongst the rank and file officers, and quite rightly so.
4912292-6259835-Photo_shopped_images_mocking_Sir_Craig_are_also_being_shared_on_-a-16_15391596...jpg
 
Boiler I cannot give you a like even though I totally agree with you. This makes me so unbelievably angry, is this creature not ashamed of his cowardice that he actually boasts about it. He should be sacked immediately and his pension forfeited and given to the Met Police Widows & Orphans at the very least you would expect the Police Federation to hold a vote of no confidence in the Met senior officers
Better yet, prosecute him.

(Big, big, nod, to Pete Leng)

REGINA V DYTHAM: CACD 1979
February 18, 2017 dls Off Crime, Police,

References: [1979] 1 QBD 722, (1979) 69 Crim App R 722
Coram: Shaw LJ, Lord Widgery CJ, McNeill J

Ratio: A constable was 30 yards away from the entrance to a club, from which he saw a man ejected. There was a fight involving cries and screams and the man was beaten and kicked to death in the gutter outside the club. The constable made no move to intervene. He drove away when the hubbub had died down stating that he was due off and was going off. He demurred to the indictment on the ground that it disclosed no offence since misconduct of an officer of justice involved malfeasance or at least a misfeasance involving an element of corruption and not merely non-feasance as alleged in the indictment.
Held: The conviction of the officer for wilful neglect to perform a duty was upheld.
Lord Widgery CJ said: ‘the allegation made was not of mere non-feasance but of deliberate failure and wilful neglect . . This involves an element of culpability which is not restricted to corruption or dishonesty but which must be of such a degree that the misconduct impugned is calculated to injure the public interest so as to call for condemnation and punishment. Whether such a situation is revealed by the evidence is a matter that a jury has to decide. It puts no heavier burden upon them than when in more familiar contexts they are called upon to consider whether driving is dangerous or a publication is obscene or a place of public resort is a disorderly house’

Regina v Dytham: CACD 1979 - swarb.co.uk
 
Better yet, prosecute him.

(Big, big, nod, to Pete Leng)

REGINA V DYTHAM: CACD 1979
February 18, 2017 dls Off Crime, Police,

References: [1979] 1 QBD 722, (1979) 69 Crim App R 722
Coram: Shaw LJ, Lord Widgery CJ, McNeill J

Ratio: A constable was 30 yards away from the entrance to a club, from which he saw a man ejected. There was a fight involving cries and screams and the man was beaten and kicked to death in the gutter outside the club. The constable made no move to intervene. He drove away when the hubbub had died down stating that he was due off and was going off. He demurred to the indictment on the ground that it disclosed no offence since misconduct of an officer of justice involved malfeasance or at least a misfeasance involving an element of corruption and not merely non-feasance as alleged in the indictment.
Held: The conviction of the officer for wilful neglect to perform a duty was upheld.
Lord Widgery CJ said: ‘the allegation made was not of mere non-feasance but of deliberate failure and wilful neglect . . This involves an element of culpability which is not restricted to corruption or dishonesty but which must be of such a degree that the misconduct impugned is calculated to injure the public interest so as to call for condemnation and punishment. Whether such a situation is revealed by the evidence is a matter that a jury has to decide. It puts no heavier burden upon them than when in more familiar contexts they are called upon to consider whether driving is dangerous or a publication is obscene or a place of public resort is a disorderly house’

Regina v Dytham: CACD 1979 - swarb.co.uk
Hopefully there's someone out there with the moral fibre and will to prosecute this wretch.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Gone soft?! Nah . . . !!!

There are "brave" thugs in uniform . . . when it comes to facing, peaceful, old-age-pensioner, unarmed, white folk . . .



and again . . . .

 
Comment from Facebook: "Clock his mate behind - don't look impressed" . . .



 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Razor blades confined to use as weapons these days ?
 
I wasn't going to comment on the Deputy Commissioner's apparent lack of moral fibre. Mainly because I can't say I would have done any better. I've been stabbed, and it left me with a scar on my face, and a deep rooted desire to never be cut again. So I'm not going to pretend for one moment I would have gone Full Bond, disarmed and killed the chap, delivered a pithy one-liner and been home in time for tea and medals. Real life isn't like that, and the natural reaction of anyone to some 'roid-raging psychopath running at them with BFO knives and screaming about Alan's Snackbar is to soil themselves while while making a spirited attempt to break the 400 metres Olympic record in the opposite direction.

That said: this was one of the most senior police officers in the UK. Even after he knew the threat had been dealt with - he admitted to hearing the shots - he left the area without even checking on the status of one of his officers he had watched being stabbed. Contrast that with the efforts of Tobias Ellwood, MP who ended up with PC Palmer's blood on him while trying to administer fist aid, until ordered to stop by paramedics.

So while I'm not in a position to castigate Sir Mackey, I can well understand the disgust and fury of serving and ex-coppers, who's opinion naturally carries far more weight than mine.
Being fairly new in service, I frequently pick my Sergeant's brains as to what to do in certain situations. My current Skip is a big bloke, in both personality and physical presence [think Brian Blessed with a Welsh accent]. By his own admission his approach is 'hands on' and this works very well round our way - the scrotes know him and it usually calms down when he hoves into view. I asked him about getting involved in something off duty after witnessing an incident. His advice was to stay out of it if possible, call it in and concentre on getting information for a good statement "unless someone is in immediate physical danger, then we have a Duty of Care and a Common Law obligation to intervene" [he paused and then muttered 'unless you are a f'kin senior Met officer]
 
One who walked in the other direction when a mate was subjected to the worst assault on staff that anyone can remember finally resigned yesterday.
Good riddance.
A good baton strike from him wouldn’t have prevented it completely, but it wouldn’t have led to my mate asking me “am I going to die” as he was placed into the ambulance.
Some new staff have not got what it takes to work in a prison environment.
I went through police training with a chap who was what the other squaddie on the course described as 'a wet fart'. After training he started his 15 weeks tutorship with an experienced beat copper [mine was ex-7RHA and delighted to have someone along who didn't mind if he farted in the car!] One weekend the tutor was away so our lad was paired with another officer. The situation went titzup and it all kicked off. Our boy stood by and watched while the other copper took a kicking and had to hit the emergency button [at which point everyone within range drops everything and heads for you - I've done it once and it is wonderful when the cavalry rock up!].

He was moved to our nick and a second similar incident took place though thankfully no one was injured. After this he was informed that no one would work with him. A spell HQ followed and then he was told that either he resign or he'd be sacked. He resigned.
 
Gone soft?! Nah . . . !!!

There are "brave" thugs in uniform . . . when it comes to facing, peaceful, old-age-pensioner, unarmed, white folk . . .



and again . . . .

When batons have been drawn you keep your hands to yourself or you get twatted. It's not a hard concept to understand.
 

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