Police gone soft?

It's probably worth noting that the fed isn't actually well supported politically these days. Most people remain members for the support and legal advice through complaints and pip and whatnot or for the long term sickness support. Low level fed is an amazing and supportive organisation, but as soon as it starts trying politically speak for us it manages only to sound utterly toothless or like some rent-a-quote police version of unite.

It exists in a vacuum similar to the College of Policing types. They have lost so much confidence of their officers over the pensions debacle and their unwillingness to support the independent challenge until it had already won. It may have coppers or ex-coppers high up but I don't think they'd know a crime scene these days if it bit them hard on the arse.

My reaction whenever this useless organisation pipes up with some catchy sound-bites about working to rule is to think 'oh fuc k off'. They haven't spoken to their members about it. Are we? No one told me. And i'm not sure I support that either.
 
It's probably worth noting that the fed isn't actually well supported politically these days. Most people remain members for the support and legal advice through complaints and pip and whatnot or for the long term sickness support. Low level fed is an amazing and supportive organisation, but as soon as it starts trying politically speak for us it manages only to sound utterly toothless or like some rent-a-quote police version of unite.

It exists in a vacuum similar to the College of Policing types. They have lost so much confidence of their officers over the pensions debacle and their unwillingness to support the independent challenge until it had already won. It may have coppers or ex-coppers high up but I don't think they'd know a crime scene these days if it bit them hard on the arse.

My reaction whenever this useless organisation pipes up with some catchy sound-bites about working to rule is to think 'oh fuc k off'. They haven't spoken to their members about it. Are we? No one told me. And i'm not sure I support that either.

Working to rule in relation to responding to 999 calls would be a bloody stupid idea. Politicians don't give a flying fornication for the average citizen. Not only would it not put them under any direct pressure, it would be a golden opportunity to shaft the police by spinning it into coppers putting lives at risk by being greedy bastards.

A mass return of blue tickets is a different matter. Politicians are perfectly fine with Joe Bloggs and his family being protected by someone armed with nothing more than a hitting stick, a can of cry-baby spray and some harsh language. But they prefer something rather more robust when it's their own arses on the line. And as I pointed out, the idea is not without precedent.
 
Last edited:
Working to rule in relation to responding to 999 calls would be a bloody stupid idea. Politicians don't give a flying fornication for the average citizen. Not only would it not put them under any direct pressure, it would be a golden opportunity to shaft the police by spinning it into coppers putting lives at risk by being greedy bastards.

A mass return of blue tickets is a different matter. Politicians are perfectly fine with Joe Bloggs and his family being protected by someone armed with a hitting stick, a can of cry-baby spray and some harsh language. But they prefer something rather more robust when it's their own arses on the line.

Agreed. The shooty types can give back their shooty things and the world will keep turning for the most part. I find it very difficult to stomach the idea of holding the normal public to ransom. I have contempt for the ambulance service and fire brigade for when they did.

The bottom line is most people will and do remain members of the fed but really that's out of necessity and because we do need some representation, but if there were a second option, I wonder how many would remain...

I think people see through them a bit - at a relatively recent large protest, the Met had put together a welfare site, with seating, loos, tea, coffee and some snacks available. The fed took a photo of their people handing out chocolate bars at the site and tweeted it, and made it look like they had created and paid for the whole thing. They were called out and it's things like that which paint them as out of touch and bring them in for contempt.
 
That's quite handy actually mate, any chance you could tanslate something off a note I nicked from a crack in the wailing wall probably 10 years ago?
I took a phot of it at the time but don't have the note anymore now due to housemove etc.

View attachment 591151

All quiet on the Hebrew front?
 
Agreed. The shooty types can give back their shooty things and the world will keep turning for the most part. I find it very difficult to stomach the idea of holding the normal public to ransom. I have contempt for the ambulance service and fire brigade for when they did.

The bottom line is most people will and do remain members of the fed but really that's out of necessity and because we do need some representation, but if there were a second option, I wonder how many would remain...

I think people see through them a bit - at a relatively recent large protest, the Met had put together a welfare site, with seating, loos, tea, coffee and some snacks available. The fed took a photo of their people handing out chocolate bars at the site and tweeted it, and made it look like they had created and paid for the whole thing. They were called out and it's things like that which paint them as out of touch and bring them in for contempt.

To a certain extent, it's the same in the Private Sector. I've paid my dues to Usdaw for a couple of decades now. But they're only useful in a worst-case scenario, when you're being investigated for something that could end up with you being dismissed. They are absolutely useless when it comes to T&C's. and their Partnership Agreement with Tesco means they do not have the power to call for strike action.
 

Chef

LE
To a certain extent, it's the same in the Private Sector. I've paid my dues to Usdaw for a couple of decades now. But they're only useful in a worst-case scenario, when you're being investigated for something that could end up with you being dismissed. They are absolutely useless when it comes to T&C's. and their Partnership Agreement with Tesco means they do not have the power to call for strike action.
O/T Back in the 70s doing a day release course in management and distributive principles one of the lecturers got fed up with a gobby female who was a bit chippy about women in the industry.

'Do you know the union with the biggest female membership?' He asked the class 'No? It's USDAW'.

Cue much happiness from said woman

He paused and added

'It's also the least effective union in the country'.

Collapse of stout party.
 

DarkBrig

War Hero
Damn, I'm good. ;)

I have got to the stage in my life that I don't expect a response from the police for any property related crime.
I don't really go out any more so thankfully I'm not at risk of the average fuckwit wanting to fight me because I have an expressive face (Wife's words) and to be honest I very rarely see any ethnic minority on the piss in Glasgow it's always drunk locals who want to know what school I went to. I tend to walk past them.

I teach first aid and often quote that the target time for an ambulance to get to you after a 999 call is 8 minutes, I don't even mention the police response time, as I said I wouldn't even bother calling the Police if the "harm" was less than £100. I would forgive the police if I thought that they were busy elsewhere issuing some sort of summary justice at the road side with the aforementioned batons and tasers, however I suspect they would be too busy explaining the relative harm the wrong pronoun's do to some 16 yr old who just needs a good smack , but then I'm 55, white and ex military (therefore I've seen what the rest of the world has to offer) what do I know about life?
 
Last edited:
I have got to the stage in my life that I don't expect a response from the police for any property related crime.
I don't really go out any more so thankfully I'm not at risk of the average fuckwit wanting to fight me because I have an expressive face (Wife's words) and to be honest I very rarely see any ethnic minority on the piss in Glasgow it's always drunk locals who want to know what school I went to. I tend to walk past them.

I teach first aid and often quote that the target time for an ambulance to get to you after a 999 call is 8 minutes, I don't even mention the police response time, as I said I wouldn't even bother calling the Police if the "harm" was less than £100. I would forgive the police if I thought that they were busy elsewhere issuing some sort of summary justice at the road side with the aforementioned batons and tasers, however I suspect they would be too busy explaining the relative harm the wrong pronoun's do to some 16 yr old who just needs a good smack , but then I'm 55, white and ex military (therefore I've seen what the rest of the world has to offer) what do I know about life?
Are you me?
 
Are you me?

1627210107469.jpeg
 
The thing is, we knew that Labour always hated the police.
When did Labour hate the police? I am old enough to remember the Wilson and Callaghan governments and I don't recall any animosity towards the police back then. Under Blair the police were as much beneficiaries of the great spending splurge as any other branch of the public service.

What you seem to be saying is that because the police allowed themselves to be the enforcers of Margaret Thatcher's economic policy in the 1980s they should have retained a special place in the hearts of the Tory party ever since. You appear to be evincing a sense of betrayal that after sticking the boot into the miners and anyone else who attracted Maggie's attention the Tories should for ever more be grateful to the boys in blue and that when it comes to treasury cutbacks the police, uniquely among public sector workers, should be exempt.

There's a lot of former miners and steelworkers who might give an ironic shrug at that notion.

Don't get me wrong, I am no fan of Arthur Scargil but in hindsight the police might have been better off telling the government that while the law would always be upheld impartially, their job was not doing the bidding of Conservative Party Central Office when it came to handling industrial disputes. There might have been some residual sympathy for them among traditional working class voters when it came to their turn to face the cutbacks if they had done so.
 
When did Labour hate the police? I am old enough to remember the Wilson and Callaghan governments and I don't recall any animosity towards the police back then. Under Blair the police were as much beneficiaries of the great spending splurge as any other branch of the public service.

What you seem to be saying is that because the police allowed themselves to be the enforcers of Margaret Thatcher's economic policy in the 1980s they should have retained a special place in the hearts of the Tory party ever since. You appear to be evincing a sense of betrayal that after sticking the boot into the miners and anyone else who attracted Maggie's attention the Tories should for ever more be grateful to the boys in blue and that when it comes to treasury cutbacks the police, uniquely among public sector workers, should be exempt.

There's a lot of former miners and steelworkers who might give an ironic shrug at that notion.

Don't get me wrong, I am no fan of Arthur Scargil but in hindsight the police might have been better off telling the government that while the law would always be upheld impartially, their job was not doing the bidding of Conservative Party Central Office when it came to handling industrial disputes. There might have been some residual sympathy for them among traditional working class voters when it came to their turn to face the cutbacks if they had done so.
The Tories always saw themselves as the party of Law and Order, so they need the police to be on side.
YouGov are running a poll. They ask this question;
"Here is a list of problems facing the country. Could you say for each of them which political party you think would handle the problem best? Law and Order"
Cons on 34% Lab 28%
 
Crime victims to be assigned a designated police officer under Boris Johnson's new plan.

Another bright idea by Bojo and the so called 'party of law and order.' I wonder how well this is going to work?
Errr... you mean like now. If I clock a crime I have to send the crime reference and my details to the victim. If I don't, or forget to tick the box saying it has been done I get a very rapid series of reminders starting with the officer whose sole job is to see that crimes are VCOP (Victims' Code of Practice) compliant.

Victims can have my email and/or my work mobile number (though I reserve the right to block them once it is concluded) or they can phone 101 and ask for me by name or number. f I am not available to take the call a tasking is sent to me with details.
 
Errr... you mean like now. If I clock a crime I have to send the crime reference and my details to the victim. If I don't, or forget to tick the box saying it has been done I get a very rapid series of reminders starting with the officer whose sole job is to see that crimes are VCOP (Victims' Code of Practice) compliant.

Victims can have my email and/or my work mobile number (though I reserve the right to block them once it is concluded) or they can phone 101 and ask for me by name or number. f I am not available to take the call a tasking is sent to me with details.
If you are all tied up doing this, who is doing all the crime prevention work?
 
Top