Police forces all face major budget cuts

#1
Okay Ive just got out of hospital and was starting to think I was still under general anesthetic after I saw.....


Police forces all face major budget cuts
By Danny Shaw Home affairs correspondent, BBC News

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Every police force in England and Wales is preparing for major budget cuts over the next five years, the BBC has found.

Forces are facing a 5% cut in government funding in 2015/16 and more cuts after the general election.

Some forces are planning to reduce officer numbers to help them operate on smaller budgets.

To lessen the impact, 34 forces plan an increase of the precept - the part of the council tax put towards policing - over the forthcoming year.

Gwent's Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) Ian Johnston said the scale of planned cuts has not "been understood by the public or politicians". His force is facing a deficit of £18.9m by 2018/19.

But former policing minister Damian Green said forces could do more to save money.

Cuts forecasts
The expected budget cuts come after a reduction of 20% since 2011 in the amount spent by the Home Office on the police.

After 2015/16, all forces are bracing themselves for further cuts amounting to hundreds of millions of pounds.

The exact level of savings required will depend on the outcome of the general election.



Some PCCs have produced forecasts of budget cuts to 2019, others until 2020, among them:

  • Kent - £61m budget cut over the next four years
  • South Yorkshire - £49m between 2016/17 and 2019/20
  • Merseyside - £47.5m between 2016/17 and 2018/19
  • Thames Valley - £33m between 2016/17 and 2017/18

Full Story here

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-31771456


Will this mean Plasmas all round or should I start getting my Charles Bronson disguise out?

Meanwhile!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ups-waste-handed-despite-MPs-told-misuse.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/pol...dget-on-wealthy-countries-ministers-told.html

Nigel Farage "you just can't make this up"
 
#2
The rozzers have nobody to blame but themselves. If they hadn't been shouting so loudly about how they've driven crime down so low that crims. are banging on the front doors of prisons and demanding to be let in, then they wouldn't be in this mess.

My local constabularly is down to its last diversity officer and the Chief only gets a new limmo every other year now. If this goes on I'll be living in a Mad Max sequel.
 
#3
The rozzers have nobody to blame but themselves. If they hadn't been shouting so loudly about how they've driven crime down so low that crims. are banging on the front doors of prisons and demanding to be let in, then they wouldn't be in this mess.

My local constabularly is down to its last diversity officer and the Chief only gets a new limmo every other year now. If this goes on I'll be living in a Mad Max sequel.
Irrefutable logic, Sir. I presume the Army is similarly being cut drastically due to it's unqualified success in Afghanistan and Iraq, and inability to stop harping on about the great victory?
 
#4
My force has had to find £80 million in the last 4 years with another 5% estimated for next year and the same for the following 4.

Given that shifts are half what they used to be. Over 70 % of the buildings are being sold and every member of civvy staff that can made redundant has been, I'm not sure what more can go. The cars we are driving are getting close to 200,000 miles on the clock in some cases.

Soon I can imagine reactive only call answering with only the most serious life and limb calls being attended.

A bad state of affairs and not what anyone wants.

With the new regime of crime classification, I can see crime stats going up.


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#5
My force has had to find £80 million in the last 4 years with another 5% estimated for next year and the same for the following 4.

Given that shifts are half what they used to be. Over 70 % of the buildings are being sold and every member of civvy staff that can made redundant has been, I'm not sure what more can go. The cars we are driving are getting close to 200,000 miles on the clock in some cases.

Soon I can imagine reactive only call answering with only the most serious life and limb calls being attended.

A bad state of affairs and not what anyone wants.

With the new regime of crime classification, I can see crime stats going up.


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Which could work in your favour regarding budgets.

The problem there is that you can't just magic plod out of thin air, so it would be a while before qualified officers hit the streets so the stats would always rise faster than the rise in actual "boots on the street". I don't agree with any further cuts, unless it starts at the top, and maybe the whole way that the police in England and Wales is run should be looked at to remove some of the deadwood at the top end of the different forces. I ain't arguing for a "Scottish" solution of one unified force, but surely there's room for change.

But one thing I wonder is how much money is spent on PCSO's and whether that money would be better spent on actual police officers. I can't think of another country where such a thing is "normal"
 
#6
Me niether. We must be the only country to employ people to look like something they're not. Even a yank couldn't grasp the concept when I tried explaining it. 'They're like mall cops - only more ineffectual!'
 
#7
The cars we are driving are getting close to 200,000 miles on the clock in some cases.



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Well there's one major saving highlighted. Central purchasing of cars. Focus or Astra estates for general patrol cars, imagine the discount you would get if centrally bought for all forces.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
I've always thought they were nowt but political window-dressing. What brought it home to me was sitting listening to a former colleague recounting his jury service. He was sitting on the jury for an assault case. Two PCSOs had attended where one bloke was kicking the living shot out of another in a supermarket. In accordance with their training, apparently, they made comprehensive notes about what was going on but didn't intervene. How the hell that makes any sense I cannot fathom.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
Well there's one major saving highlighted. Central purchasing of cars. Focus or Astra estates for general patrol cars, imagine the discount you would get if centrally bought for all forces.
Tending to see more Hyundais and the like than European manufacturers in some areas now.
 
#11
Just think how busy and efficient they would look if thay acutely investigated rapes, abuse and kidnappings carried out by certain sections of the community as opposed to turning a blind eye for fear of upsetting a few people.
 
#12
Well there's one major saving highlighted. Central purchasing of cars. Focus or Astra estates for general patrol cars, imagine the discount you would get if centrally bought for all forces.
Regional purchasing has been in for sometime already. Massive discounts already apply, the problem is cars are doing 300 miles a day and are finished in 18 months to 2 years with the lower end spec cars. BMW and Volvo offer very good deals along with Skoda, the warranty package is better, they last longer and have better resale. My force used to have Skoda Octavia VRS as area cars, £500 cheaper than a Mondeo, much faster, more reliable and last and resell for more, the surrounding forces wouldn't purchase them so we have to pay more for a worse car. Figure that.


Wets.
 
#13
They'd save a shed load more money if they amalgamated the 40 odd Police Forces in England and Wales down to 10 or so Regional Forces.
Agreed, most police agree but government currently will not entertain it. Something about divide and conquer with more smaller weaker and less coordinated forces.


Wets.
 
#14
Well there's one major saving highlighted. Central purchasing of cars. Focus or Astra estates for general patrol cars, imagine the discount you would get if centrally bought for all forces.
Yeah, then you get what we see here which is VW Combis, Fiestas, the occasional Opel "crossover" and even Smart4two........

That's the ones marked as police cars, the unmarked ones tend to be Seats and Skodas.......
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#16
Agreed, most police agree but government currently will not entertain it. Something about divide and conquer with more smaller weaker and less coordinated forces.


Wets.
Irritating, cut down the dead wood at the top, a greater efficiencies, in purchasing, training, equipment etc. Local county police forces would still exist, but at a divisional level, rather than as distinct forces.
 
#17
A very large leap - however given the noises made about fricking sandbags the whole time, I would expect to see the Army offering to shoulder a greater burden in UK Resilience/UK Ops and spaces being made in Emergency Planning roles as a consequence.
Though the Police do a bloody good job as Cat 1 Responders often providing the central GOLD coordination for all other responders, it is a thankless task, especially where, in some places, local authorities have declared major incidents in order to raise a profile.

Handing over some of the "Chalice that brimmeth over with ye brunneous, profound and pungent" to some other keen-crack-on-can-do-sort-of-chaps must be manna from heaven for PCCs.
 
#20
What we need is more outsourcing to private enterprise of most Police back office functions, speed traps etc. Then we employ a security firm to replace most traditional policing roles such as Olympics, Footy matches, patrolling the streets etc etc. Introduce payment by results so if Force A fails to achieve its targets it suffers a clawback.
Oh yes privatisation is the way ahead for all public services
TAXI
 

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