Police chief: we cannot cope with violent crime

Status
Not open for further replies.
#1
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/mai...ml&sSheet=/portal/2005/03/13/ixportaltop.html

One of Britain's most senior police officers has admitted that his force is being overwhelmed by violent crime and cannot cope.

Steve Green, the Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire, said that among the principal causes of the crisis were Government reforms that compelled him to use officers for clerical tasks instead of front-line duties.


Steve Green: 'We are in a crisis situation'
The situation was so bad that he was preparing to "farm out" murder investigations to other police forces because his own detectives did not have time to tackle them.

Nottingham has been one of the worst affected areas for gun crime, which hit record levels across England and Wales last year.

Mr Green said ministers had a "fixation" with keeping officer numbers up - but had, in fact, been responsible for policies that had taken police away from front-line duties to do jobs that should be carried out by civilian staff, such as writing Home Office reports.

"We are reeling with the murders," he said. "We are in a long-standing crisis situation with major crime and it won't go away overnight.

"Having police doing back-office jobs is one of the factors [hampering us]. I want to increase the number of operational cops by reducing the numbers doing back-office jobs. It's frustrating to know that I could make better use of the money I've got, but I'm constrained from doing it because officer numbers is a political football. All the parties have the same fixation."

Mr Green said he was prevented from putting more police into front-line duties because if he reduced the number of officers doing clerical work he would lose a large amount of his funding from the Crime Fighting Fund, a Labour measure that gives extra money to forces that keep officer numbers high.

"Our accountant has said that if there was a way out of it, he would tell me," he said.

Mr Green, whose comments will increase pressure on the Government over its law-and-order policies, said his force was heavily in debt. He regularly had to borrow detectives from other constabularies to tackle a spate of largely drugs-related murders.

"We are now routinely going out to 'foreign' forces to get additional officers." One option they were on the verge of adopting was to farm an entire murder inquiry to another force. "I'm not aware of any other force ever having done such a thing," he said.

Nottingham's crisis has been prompted by a sharp rise in the number of murders and other violent crimes.

Since 2001, the force has had to investigate 21 Category A murders - those classed as being high-profile with no immediate suspect. Before 2000, it was dealing with one Category A murder every 12 to 18 months on average. Its officers are currently running 30 murder investigations.

Nottinghamshire residents are also three times more likely than the national average to have their car broken into, four times as likely to be burgled, almost five times as likely to be robbed, and twice as likely to suffer sexual attack. Nottinghamshire was also among the bottom four of under-performing forces in official figures last year.

Mr Green's decision to speak out follows another fatal shooting last week. Paul Thomas, 34, had left a pub in Radford, Nottingham, when he was gunned down just after 4.30pm on Thursday.

Firearms offences in England and Wales rose to a high of 24,094 last year with levels in Nottingham the fifth highest per head of population after London, Manchester, Liverpool and the West Midlands.

The Association of Chief Police Officers said other forces were experiencing similar pressures to Nottinghamshire because of the need for officers to carry out bureaucratic tasks that should be done by civilians.

"We've been raising it with the Government for some months," said a spokesman. "There is a fixation with police numbers, and an inflexibility over budgets, which is not producing effective policing. We can recruit officers, but not necessarily civilian staff."

David Davis, the shadow Home Secretary, said Mr Green's predicament was an example of the Government's ring-fencing of money, together with forces being swamped with bureaucracy.

He said: "We will do away with the national policing plan that creates these tar-gets so those police they have can be properly used."
 
#2
As the rozzers admit they can't cope with violent crime, I hope that means I can have my handguns back to defend myself....and a deputy sheriff's badge would be nice too.
 
#4
Live in Nottingham myself woo I famous!
The police should stop recruiting ponsey Uni leavers if you ask me!
 
#5
On the contrary, coppers on the street are very good at dealing with violent crime in my experience. The main problem is that i@m arresting the same idiots week in, week out as the courts refuse to hand down appropriate sentences! :x
 

Ventress

LE
Moderator
#7
Maximus said:
On the contrary, coppers on the street are very good at dealing with violent crime in my experience. The main problem is that i@m arresting the same idiots week in, week out as the courts refuse to hand down appropriate sentences! :x
Yep, I deal with the same conkers every week, send them to court to get a £50 fine they cant pay and a 100 hrs community service, they dont turn up for. The courts have a lot to answer for!

RANT OVER!
 
#8
Welcome to "our" world. I deal with this stuff everyday. Murders, rapes, et al and NEVER enough personnel to deal with it.

Of course, further gun control will solve all...
 
#9
You know, the home office had the gaul to put out a statement on the chief constables statement.

It went something like this (paraphrasing, but will replace with statement when i locate it)

" The govt have invested a record amount of money and resources into the police force and are actively cutting beaurocracy and redtape. The number of police officers is at an all time high under labour.

The Home office provide each police force with the resources that are deemed adequate for its individual needs. As such it is up to the individual police force to manage their personnel and resources in order to maintain an adequate level of policing"
In other words, shut the f*ck up and get on with it! Its your fault if you cant manage the resources we give you effectively!

Another example of the govt (home office) passing the blame! :roll:
 
#10
If things are as bad as he says, he should be sacked and a better replacement appointed.
 
#11
luke said:
If things are as bad as he says, he should be sacked and a better replacement appointed.
Why?

Has it occured to you that he may be doing the best with the minimal resources he has to work with?

Maybe he is just the first one with the balls to admit that they cant cope with the meager resources they are being provided.

Or maybe he is just crap at his job (which i doubt)

A_S
 
#12
armourer said:
As the rozzers admit they can't cope with violent crime, I hope that means I can have my handguns back to defend myself....and a deputy sheriff's badge would be nice too.
Yeah when that happens, I'll have a flying pig sandwhich, on the coach on the way to my two week skiing and ice skating holiday in Hell.
 
#13
luke said:
If things are as bad as he says, he should be sacked and a better replacement appointed.
No, sorry, to disappoint you. Replace him and his successor will just have to admit to the same or let the county descend further into the mire.

The man should be applauded for having the balls to come clean about something that the Homer* Office would rather just sweep under the carpet or blame on someone else.

This is the response of a pragmatist, confronted by a situation that has no easy answer, not a politically correct, Neue Arbeit 'yes man'.


* Doh! Typo; but it seemed appropriate so I left it in. :lol:
 
#14
luke said:
If things are as bad as he says, he should be sacked and a better replacement appointed.
What, and keep sacking them until they say the nice things you want to hear? If there is a problem (which I don't doubt), then it needs to be brought out into the open so that solutions can be found. we keep complaining that there is not enough plain talking, and now it's not good enough when there is!?

:roll:
 
#15
From Telegraph article it appears the problem is officers engaged on paperwork in the station rather than wooden poultice application in the street. Later reports suggest this paperwork is to satisfy the civil serveants that have frown in number, and demands, to meet requirements for monitoring workloads. I heard that one police force was reviewed more than 30 times in one year. The need is to make police accountable to local police committees. I seem to remember Wellington reporting to his civil servants that if he were not busy fighting a war he would be only too pleased to tell them how much butter had been issued. If locals want drunkenness dealt with, that should be the priority and stuff the reports.
Labour spin seems to be that it is all a Telegraph plot to embarrass the Govt. I see that as never mind the message, shoot the messenger. It is nothing to do with ability of the man at the top - other than his strength of character to say 'bolx - I'm busy' to the far off "experts"
 
#16
Agent_Smith said:
You know, the home office had the gaul to put out a statement on the chief constables statement.

It went something like this (paraphrasing, but will replace with statement when i locate it) ...........

Another example of the govt (home office) passing the blame! :roll:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/nottinghamshire/4345599.stm
Downing Street enters police row

The chief constable said he had to "borrow" officers from other forces
Downing Street has defended the funding received by Nottinghamshire police following criticisms raised by the force's chief constable.
Steve Green said his force was "reeling" from dealing with 30 murders, dealt with excessive paperwork and had to "borrow" officers from other forces.

But Tony Blair's spokesman said the force had received "significant support" in terms of resources.

MPs from Nottingham are to meet Home Office chiefs to discuss the issue.

The spokesman said: "Everyone recognises there are problems in Nottinghamshire but there are different views about the cause of these problems."
He said the force had seen a 4.8% increase in its grant - "well above the minimum granted to all police authorities" - in addition to having 200 more officers than in 1997 and 267 more civilian staff.
We are in a long-standing crisis situation with major crime and it won't go away overnight

Steve Green
Nottinghamshire chief constable

Mr Green told the Sunday Telegraph the force may have to "farm out" murder cases to other forces.

The newspaper said that since 2001 officers have had to investigate 21 Category A murders - high profile cases with no immediate suspect.

However, prior to 2000, the average was one every 12 to 18 months.

The paper quotes Mr Green as saying: "We are reeling with the murders. We are in a long-standing crisis situation with major crime and it won't go away overnight."

But Graham Allen, who represents Nottingham North, criticised Mr Green for turning to the press and questioned how officers were being deployed.

HIGHEST GUN CRIME AREAS
1. London
2. Manchester
3. Liverpool
4. West Midlands
5. Nottingham


Fall in Nottinghamshire gun crime

John Hammond, chairman of the Nottinghamshire Police Federation, said the force faces "unique demands" because "Nottinghamshire has always been funded as a rural police force, but the levels of demands that it faces on a day to day basis are those that are faced by metropolitan police forces".

He said the problems faced by the force could be addressed if the way in which it was funded was changed to reflect these demands.

Shadow Home Secretary David Davis said the root cause of problems in Nottingham, and other urban areas, was the "failure of the government's drink and drugs strategy".

And Mark Oaten MP, Liberal Democrat Shadow Home Secretary, said: "The police should be out on the streets deterring and detaining criminals, not stuck behind desks filling in endless mountains of paperwork."

Former home secretary David Blunkett admitted there was a national problem with organised crime and drugs, but said the proposed creation of the Serious Organised Crime Agency showed it was being addressed.
SSDD, same sh1t, different day
 
#17
Thanks scalieback :wink:
 
#19
:roll:

I'm sure this has done wonders for the morale of your entry-level bobby, they get enough crap from the public without their head-honcho bad-mouthing their efforts in public.
 
#20
Nottingham has been one of the worst affected areas for gun crime, which hit record levels across England and Wales last year.
ahhh gun control law seemed to be working then :roll:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest Threads