Police Arrest Ipswich Murder Suspect

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#1
I am a bit annoyed with the radio/BBC/press etc who are reporting the 3 murdered women from Ipswich and continually refer to them as "prostitutes", never as "women".

The implication is that "they brought it upon themselves" or they "are lesser people who don't count".

When a black drug dealer is murdered he is treated with more respect by the media.
 
#2
I agree with what you say mate, but this is British Journalism, catering for the great unwashed that make up the British public. Do you really expect anything better?
 
#3
smallbore said:
The implication is that "they brought it upon themselves" or they "are lesser people who don't count"
Your implication. The newsdesks may feel that naming the 'profession' adds context to the developing narrative, i.e. that something of a pattern would appear to be emerging in this case. I'm not sure there is any disdain in the reporting - most adept journalists are quite comfortable with understanding and relaying the social problems that make some people choose prostitution without prejudice.

What would you prefer - some sanitised reference to what they do and did? If the media called them 'wimmin' how would we know that they were prostitutes - a vital fact common to all the deaths?

As for your closing point, do you really believe that?
 
#4
It's quite tragic really that these women had to go down this route in the first place but the world is far from perfect.
 
#5
I think the point does need to be made that they were 'women first, sex workers second'

After all , was every woman Sutcliffe killed on the game?

Every woman in Ipswich of a certain age should be regarding herself as a potential target.
 
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#6
Well i have continually heard to them refered to as "sex workers" today.
I suppose "prostitute" or "sex worker" is still better than "drug addict" which is what they all were too.
It doesnt get away from the fact that there is a very dangerous person in that area preying on a vunerable group of women.
Lets hope the nutter is caught soon.
 
#7
The common factor is that they are prostitutes and not housewives or checkout girls. The BBC et al have made no implication that these women are any "less" than you or I, they have merely stated facts.

I have no doubt that in and around Ipswich tonight, there are a lot of women who are prostitutes through lack of other options that are facing a choice of putting food on the table and a roof over their heads or possibly getting murdered.

I hope this ba*tard is caught very very soon.
 
#8
Victorian_Major said:
smallbore said:
The implication is that "they brought it upon themselves" or they "are lesser people who don't count"
Your implication. The newsdesks may feel that naming the 'profession' adds context to the developing narrative, i.e. that something of a pattern would appear to be emerging in this case. I'm not sure there is any disdain in the reporting - most adept journalists are quite comfortable with understanding and relaying the social problems that make some people choose prostitution without prejudice.

What would you prefer - some sanitised reference to what they do and did? If the media called them 'wimmin' how would we know that they were prostitutes - a vital fact common to all the deaths?

As for your closing point, do you really believe that?
No, I'm with Smallbore here, this fixation with their way of earning a living does not contextualise the narrative, rather it sensationalises on one hand and provides distance at the other. Prostitutes have been around since the beginning of time, as have serial killers who prey on them. I think that Smallbore is not saying ignore what they were, just acknowledge that they were human beings who someone is likely to be grieving over to-day.

There is a comparison to this, what was it now? Oh yes 'murdered innocent civilians' and 'dead soldiers', ring any bells?

Oh yes I do agree that it is the implication made by such reporting
 
#9
western said:
I think that Smallbore is not saying ignore what they were, just acknowledge that they were human beings who someone is likely to be grieving over to-day.
Thank you. I was.
 
#10
My pleasure
 
#11
Ok with what you say but by identifying the group to which these women belong might ease the panic that mums/checkout girls et al could be feeling when out and about- and yes,
It could also create a false sense of security -so it's a no win situation
 
#12
I take the point but there can be too much of the human dimension in the reporting of such news. If the news was filled with such apparently necessary caveats as reflecting on the tragedy and 'thinking about the children' then we would have thicker newspapers and longer bulletins.
 
#13
archer said:
Ok with what you say but by identifying the group to which these women belong might ease the panic that mums/checkout girls et al could be feeling when out and about- and yes,
It could also create a false sense of security -so it's a no win situation
It's looking like at least 5 now...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/suffolk/6168697.stm
 
#14
Whilst I can accept the use of 'prostitutes' in the terms mentioned above, I think it should be borne in mind that we ourselves may be prejudicial. To me, prostitute describes a way of life and is not a term of condemnation or abuse. Those outside the world of sex-worker can never fully understand just why any one particular person has gone down that route. Even if someone describes a woman as a tart, it is up to me how I view that description.
 
#15
It is the same when they refer to the perpetrator of a crime "...and ex soldier". You never hear of "...and retired dustman"
 
#16
I think it's worth pointing out that they are prostitutes - ie women who will invite contact with and disappear to private/secluded places with complete strangers. I don't see it as a negative comment but just a sign that he has targeted them so far.

However, I don't believe for a moment that any women who are not prostitutes will feel a false sense of security. He could change his MO, get more confident or there could be mistaken identity (which is what happened with some of the Sutcliffe women, I think).

Most women are very careful about their safety and will not take risks even when there is not a serial killer in the news - ie we walk longer way home through a busy area than short cuts etc, especially in winter months. My walk home from my local station is down a nice residential street but it's badly lit and on dark evenings I am constantly aware of who is around me and don't use my phone or become distracted for the few minutes it takes to get safely home.

It's good that the local police chief in Ipswich has reminded people that with party season coming up, they should take good care of each other - being drunk and losing friends, running out of cash and walking home or getting into anything other than a licensed cab are sadly how these things can start.
 
#18
I think it unlikely- under the present circumstances- that he/she will switch to "ordinary" women.


This shows very careful planning.
The targets and disposal say a great deal

This person has a percieved reason for killing and there are cold, calculating aspects that I see which indicate someone who has read extensively and thinks they have worked out how to defeat the police and forensic services and having killed wants to prove how good he/she is by beating the investigators and thus continuing their mission.

I think it is more than killing for the sake of the act, it is also a mind game and one I hope Suffolk Police soon win
 
#19
archer said:
I think it unlikely- under the present circumstances- that he/she will switch to "ordinary" women.


This shows very careful planning.
The targets and disposal say a great deal

This person has a percieved reason for killing and there are cold, calculating aspects that I see which indicate someone who has read extensively and thinks they have worked out how to defeat the police and forensic services and having killed wants to prove how good he/she is by beating the investigators and thus continuing their mission.

I think it is more than killing for the sake of the act, it is also a mind game and one I hope Suffolk Police soon win
Want to confess something? :wink:
 
#20
Is there really much difference between a female who says give me a good night out , an expensive meal and a present and I'll drop them for you and a prostitute who says cut out all the first bit and just give me the money ???
Not a lot by my reckonning
 
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