Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Police apologise after telling wrong family teenage son died in crash

Says it all really...

Police have apologised to a family who were incorrectly told their son had died in a car crash.

Officers were called to a collision on the A90 near Crimond in Aberdeenshire at 7.30am on Monday 5 October, Police Scotland said.

One man was pronounced dead at the scene and another was taken to hospital in a critical condition.

But police were forced to apologise after they told the injured man's family he died in the crash by mistake.

The victim was finally identified as Dylan Irvine, 19, and the injured 18-year-old is still in hospital in a critical condition, the force said.

Chief Inspector Neil Lumsden said that officers were "faced with a confused scene" when trying to identify Mr Irvine and incorrect information was provided by a witness.

He said: "Once identified, the error was promptly corrected and the families of those involved were spoken to and were understanding of the circumstances.

skynews-crimond-aberdeenshire_5130229.jpg


"We have apologised to the families for any unintended upset and will review to identify any learning."

Mr Irvine's family described him as a "loving son, brother and grandson".

They said in a statement: "He was loved by all that had the pleasure of knowing him. He is sorely missed by all. He had an adventurous and outgoing soul and had the biggest heart."

They thanked the emergency services for "their efforts at the scene".

Sergeant Chris Smith, of the North Road policing unit, said that police are still investigating the cause of the crash.

He added: "I would again ask that anyone who has any information regarding the movements of the vehicle or the occupants, who hasn't already been spoken to by police, please contact us on 101, quoting incident number 0491 of Monday 5 October 2020."
 

ericferret

War Hero
A few years back the missus goes flying in a light aircraft. Just after takeoff it develops a serious vibration and she declares an emergency returning to the field she took off from.
Safely on the ground she cancels the emergency. Turns out to be a loose wing access panel.
Meanwhile Distress and Diversion have decided to turn it into a practice exercise.
Knock at the door answered by my 15 year old daughter. It's the police there to tell her that her mothers aircraft is missing!!!

I was working in Holland at the time and received a phone call from a distraught daughter.
Spent the next hour in a panic until D&D confirmed the aircraft was safe.

Not a nice day and I feel for the familly above.
 
A sorry situation. I'll bet the polis involved are pretty distraught at having got it wrong, in addition of course to the deceased family.
 

Tyk

LE
I'm sure this has happened on many occasions before, when there's bits of vehicle/building/train/aircraft with personal possessions strewn about all over the place, identifying victims with certainty must be very difficult especially if they're similar ages and builds.
In these days of Twatter and Faceache it must be a race to inform families before they find out another way which must be a nightmare for the Police who really want to get it right.
Miserable situation for all involved.
 
Aged thirteen, along with a friend I administered a jumper pulled over the head kicking to a scrote who was shooting at kids in the park with an air rifle.
When the parky showed up we decided that our task was completed and removed ourselves from the scene, followed soon after by the daftie with the air rifle.

The park keeper called the police, who thought it was appropriate to go to my mum's door and tell her they wanted to speak to me in relation to a shooting incident.
 
I had a mate who had the padre and some officer turn up at her door to say her husband was at death door in Poland after being ran over. Which was odd as he had just popped out to the shop 5 minutes before.
It was her ex, who never bothered updating JPA.

He survived.
 
Exact same thing happened to a girl friend of mine on a night out in Southport...
Hideous car smash , full of teenagers..
Two dead at scene (pre seatbelts) one I'm afraid to say decapitated, so you could only imagine the scene confronting Plod....
News broken to parents...
View the body, positive ID (her dress was deemed sufficient) we had her Grandad, hysterical, absolutely broken,for nigh on twelve hours, until E****e regained consciousness...
She'd swapped dresses with her friend in the Nightclub and as both had come out through the windscreen nobody was able to sort the mess out at the scene.

'Shit happens' after shit happens sometimes.
 
Bad admin, but let me give you the other side of the coin, just to put things in context/perspective,...........you'll figure it out.

My motorcycling mate in the UK was the force class one bike instructor, along with doing contract work teaching other euro-police agencies how to effectively use motorcycles. A veritable biker god. When he was not teaching he used to ride his bike doing traffic duties and slotted into dealing with fatal accidents - he had a knack for it.

He is out and about one day and gets a call to attend a fatal at a location on the A47. When he gets there fire and ambulance are in attendance. Let me set the scene for you: A bloke and his Mrs are in his new TVR, him showing off and he goes to overtake, one of those sections of road that is three lanes, the centre lane more or less being first come first served. It was a slight hill and the HGV 1 coming the other way in the centre lane had not been able to get in past the vehicle it was overtaking. The TVR hit it straight on and exploded, the largest single component they found was the engine and gearbox combo, everything else was just shredded fibreglass. The husband was instantly killed as the steering column went through his chest and the wife was ejected upwards and landed in a tree at the side of the road.

They know what happened because my mate was holding the hand of the woman and talking to her whilst she was in the tree bleeding to death internally - the paramedic had given him the nod that she was not going to survive. She knew and she asked my mate if he would go and tell her kids nicely what had happened and make sure they were taken to their Nan's house.

After she died with him holding her hand he got on his bike and rode to tell a 12 year old and a 14 year old that their parents who had gone for a 15 minute drive were never coming home.

Our little gang went for the usual sunday ride that weekend and he broke down and cried when he unloaded that on us.

Coppers are human, mistakes happen, dealing with fatals is a shit job.
 
Last edited:

jmb3296

War Hero
I attended a driver training, road safety class for 17 year olds just taking to the roads. I met one of the bravest most dignified people I have ever met who was there to tell the oiks what had happened to her two boys from the mothers perspective a story she had told to previous courses. She used photographs and got through to everyone in the room. You could hear a pin drop during her part of the day.

basically her two boys, late teen and early 20 had a summer job and were both insured on her car. They left early morning to drive to work. She didn’t see them leave and didn’t know who was driving that day.

they met a coach driven by a coach driver still over the limit from the night before. He failed to take the bend and took them head on. She showed photos of the impact site.

the boys were cut from the car and one was dead at scene, driver I think. both he and the passenger were facially disfigured.

she, their mother, sat for I think several days beside the bed of the surviving son who was in a coma without knowing which one had lived and which one had died.

fatal car smashes can be horrific, wrong id’s can happen in the early stages, it’s tragic but understandable.
 
A few years back the missus goes flying in a light aircraft. Just after takeoff it develops a serious vibration and she declares an emergency returning to the field she took off from.
Safely on the ground she cancels the emergency. Turns out to be a loose wing access panel.
Meanwhile Distress and Diversion have decided to turn it into a practice exercise.
Knock at the door answered by my 15 year old daughter. It's the police there to tell her that her mothers aircraft is missing!!!

I was working in Holland at the time and received a phone call from a distraught daughter.
Spent the next hour in a panic until D&D confirmed the aircraft was safe.

Not a nice day and I feel for the familly above.


.... then it was confirmed that, yes, her life insurance was indeed up to date?

RIP to the lad
 
You have a bad day at work, and then a story like this, and additional stories, make you realise that it's of no consequence whatsoever.

Very sad for all involved.
 
I went to a fatal RTC yesterday. Traffic were held up at another big one and the three Response crews who went (I was single crewed, so 4 officers in total plus an off duty PCSO who was passing) were on our own for a while. Traffic were pleased when they got there a we had done what we could in terms of scene management while letting fire and medics do their stuff. It’s never easy and the traffic guys sent out a really good email to the grown ups thanking us.
 
After she died with him holding her hand he got on his bike and rode to tell a 12 year old and a 14 year old that their parents who had gone for a 15 minute drive were never coming home.

In our syndicate at the staff course was a police sergeant - Flying Squad, no less.

His description of "sh!t" was as a young copper, going to a house on Christmas Eve to tell a couple that their son and daughter, who had been driving over for the holiday, had both just died in a traffic accident. Worst job in the world.
 
Knock knock
Are you still the widow Smith
No
Well you are now

Death messages one of the worst jobs in the police everyone hated doing them, except on one occasion little scrote always getting nicked, his mother horrid old slag who used to scream and rant about every time he got arrested. Eventually he grew up and moved away but still continued his life of crime, got a phone call from a county force could we go and tell mrs xxx her little boy had been involved in a shoot out with the RCS and not doing well at all. Suddenly every one wanted to pass on the bad news
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
I did an aero-medical moves for a family trying to find help for their son. He'd been in an RTC in a car with three others late one evening, all sober no drugs, all ordinary nice young men. The driver crossed over a junction on a green light when a bus ran the red light and T boned them. Their son ended up in hospital with multiple injuries with severe internal bleeding. He needed his chest drained and his spleen removed in short order, but his brain started to swell. Transfered immediately to the local neurousrgery unit where they operated to decompress the brain. Many days on a ventilator and every time they tried to wake him he started to fit. Eventually they managed to get him off the ventilator and breathing by himself. Only he was now in a persistant vegative state. He has, as far as I am aware never recovered any meaningful consciousness, Lovely caring family now have him being cared for at home.

Sometimes death, is in my opinion, a far more preferable outcome than survival, in particular with brain or spinal trauma, which I would have a my own personal preference to survival.
 
In our syndicate at the staff course was a police sergeant - Flying Squad, no less.

His description of "sh!t" was as a young copper, going to a house on Christmas Eve to tell a couple that their son and daughter, who had been driving over for the holiday, had both just died in a traffic accident. Worst job in the world.

Take an informative, I can't give anyone a like for that kind of thing it does not seem appropriate, no disrespect intended.

For a bit of levity I will share my first sudden death as a probationer: We get the call at about 21.30hrs on a saturday night. We were on town centre, so on foot, we got the shout as the house was just off the town centre. We arrive and my walker knocks, introduces us and we get invited in by the lady of the house, she is around 70'ish. She asks if we would like a cuppa whilst we wait for the undertaker to arrive, we accept and she says we should go to the living room where her deceased husband is sat in his armchair. Match of the day was on and she is telling us it is his favourite thing on telly and that he was sat there to watch it. The undertaker arrives, match of the day is still on so she offers the undertakers lads a cuppa if they let her old man finish watching it before they take him away. No fuss, no bother, all matter of fact, but underneath it I bet she was devastated.
 

Tyk

LE
Bad admin, but let me give you the other side of the coin, just to put things in context/perspective,...........you'll figure it out.

My motorcycling mate in the UK was the force class one bike instructor, along with doing contract work teaching other euro-police agencies how to effectively use motorcycles. A veritable biker god. When he was not teaching he used to ride his bike doing traffic duties and slotted into dealing with fatal accidents - he had a knack for it.

He is out and about one day and gets a call to attend a fatal at a location on the A47. When he gets there fire and ambulance are in attendance. Let me set the scene for you: A bloke and his Mrs are in his new TVR, him showing off and he goes to overtake, one of those sections of road that is three lanes, the centre lane more or less being first come first served. It was a slight hill and the HGV 1 coming the other way in the centre lane had not been able to get in past the vehicle it was overtaking. The TVR hit it straight on and exploded, the largest single component they found was the engine and gearbox combo, everything else was just shredded fibreglass. The husband was instantly killed as the steering column went through his chest and the wife was ejected upwards and landed in a tree at the side of the road.

They know what happened because my mate was holding the hand of the woman and talking to her whilst she was in the tree bleeding to death internally - the paramedic had given him the nod that she was not going to survive. She knew and she asked my mate if he would go and tell her kids nicely what had happened and make sure they were taken to their Nan's house.

After she died with him holding her hand he got on his bike and rode to tell a 12 year old and a 14 year old that their parents who had gone for a 15 minute drive were never coming home.

Our little gang went for the usual sunday ride that weekend and he broke down and cried when he unloaded that on us.

Coppers are human, mistakes happen, dealing with fatals is a shit job.

I used to drink with a retired Chief Fire Officer with similar memories, he'd only talk about them when he'd had an off day and got plastered, all I can say is I'm glad I don't have those sort of memories other than from other people.

The blue light services do a job I could never do unless forced to by circumstances (squaddies too for that matter) and it annoys the hell out of me when I hear criticisms like the article in the OP. It's so easy for there to be accidental ID screwups and it's about impossible to avoid the odd one slipping through.
 
Top