Poachers

Discussion in 'Southern Africa' started by tiger stacker, Apr 22, 2012.

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  1. BBC News - Kenya rangers shoot dead five suspected poachers

    Kenya rangers shoot dead five suspected poachers

    Kenya says there has been an increase in poaching in recent years
    Continue reading the main story
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    Wildlife rangers have shot dead five suspected ivory poachers during a gun battle in western Kenya.

    Two rangers were hurt during the battle in West Pokot county, said officials from Kenya's Wildlife Service (KWS).

    They said 50kg (110lb) of elephant tusks and AK-47 rifles were recovered.

    Kenya has recently taken a more aggressive stance against poaching as it combats a surge in demand for ivory from Asia, despite a long-standing ban on the international trade.

    KWS spokesman Paul Udoto said on Saturday that rangers were determined to make poaching "a high-cost, low-benefit activity".

    The KWS says about 100 elephants are killed each year in Kenya by poachers.

    Ivory from elephants is often smuggled to Asia for use in ornaments, while rhino horns are used in traditional medicine.
     
  2. The Kenyan rangers use SLR's.

    *fap fap fap fap fap*

    Ooooo yeah baby.
     
  3. Easy way to cut down on poaching incidents and raise some cash for conservation - I bet there are rich Spam/Boxhead/whatever hunters out there who would pay USD100,000 for the chance to legally shoot someone.

    Swear them in as Deputies and off you go. Job jobbed.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Yet there was comment about Colonel whatsisname letting loose at a Gibsons only a few days ago.
     
  5. Would've thought you'd need something bigger than an AK to drop Dumbo?
     
  6. It's a 7.62? Actually your right. Grab the mortars and muskets. Much more practical
     
  7. I once sasw a docu about an ex-Royal Marine Lt Colonel who was hunting poachers somewhere in Africa. It could have been Kenya, but I'm not sure. He was ex-SBS, and also spoke the local language. He was training up the local game wardens to do the job. I tried to encourage a few animal rights types to go over and kick some arse. A definite step-up from sending shit to Glaxo employees and breaking butchers' windows. I got no takers.
     
  8. Rule 7.62?
     
  9. You are thinking sportsmanship and one shot one kill from a big Nitro Express rifle.

    I am thinking of half a dozen bandits with cheap chinese AK's tootling up in a technical and simply spraying the Elephant with automatic fire until it drops. It's not pretty and it takes a long time for the crippled Elephant to die, it's probably still alive and in agony when they butcher it for the tusks and feet.
     
  10. Karamojo Bell used a small-bore for his heffelump shots - from that paragon of knowledge, Wikiwotsit:

    "The bulk of his kills were made with Rigby rifles manufactured on the Mauser action in .275 Rigby"

    Seen elephants that triggered land-mines and still walked around, and a couple with AK rounds in them. Not pleasant.
     
  11. Whilst filming a BBC wildlife series we spent some time with a Namibian Anti Poaching Unit. These APUs worked with trackers who would follow Rhino spoor by dipping their hands into dung piles to gauge warmth of the deposit and following the flying dung beetles. They were armed with R4 semi autos but also had a 7.62 FN (in fact a fully Auto R1) in one of the back up vehicles - which I got to carry (woohoo!) The R4 was obviously not for shooting dangerous beasts.

    They fully expected that, should they encounter the poachers, there would be a shoot out. TBH I got the impression that such meetings were rare - however they would expect very little paper work should poachers be killed in the process. The bodies of those killed were sometimes left in the bush as the patrols were occasionally on foot.