Playing with auto focus.

#1
Anyone got a rec on somewhere I could go to practice using the different auto focus modes no my "new" body?

Need a mixture of approach/retreating & crossing subjects.
 
#3
Not being funny, but how about a busy road junction?
Seems the obvious choice... But, Belfast, Roads, "Big" camera, current events..... Not saying it's necessarily a recipe for disaster but I'd put money on being questioned about intentions in fairly short order. By officialdom or otherwise.

Just not keen.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#6
Not being funny, but how about a busy road junction?
Seems the obvious choice... But, Belfast, Roads, "Big" camera, current events..... Not saying it's necessarily a recipe for disaster but I'd put money on being questioned about intentions in fairly short order. By officialdom or otherwise.

Just not keen.
Sorry, forgot you were in Belfast. PF's idea is also excellent. As dogs do random moves it is a real test of your skills as well.
 
#11
It's mahoosively different from the D200, in terms of operation it's the only really noticeable difference.

Want to be at least semi au fait with it before I next need to use it for something I actually want decent shots from.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#14
I'm a pure amateur photographer, but I enjoy it. You don't need the most expensive SLR to capture some amazing images. I use a Canon EOS 400D. I used a 75-200 lens for these shots:

image.jpg
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#15
Unless you've got about £20k to spend on kit, you're not going to equal that chap's efforts. Skill is a big part of it but you're never going to get those sort of results with less than superb equipment.
I've been saying that about shooting floodlight rugby for years. And there is some truth in it.

Got friendly with one of the pros at Ravenhill (after lending him batteries!) and said as much one evening. After having a bit of a "debate" about it, he took a D50 (6MP, 800EISO maximum) with a f5.6 200mm prime on it and took a series of shots that, with minimum post processing would have been perfect usable for press purposes. Embarrassing.

There's a "line", he couldn't have done the same with a phone camera, but once you've hit a certain point on the equipment ladder, as long as you can spot the shot and know how far you can push... It's skill.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#16
I think sometimes it's being in the perfect position. It used to be dreadfully disappointing with film waiting for the pictures coming back. At least now you can bin the crap and it costs nothing. Catching the dog with his eyes open is surprisingly difficult.
 
#17
Oh, and BTW he gave me a tip which sounds counterintuitive, but works. It may only work with Nikons though, not sure.

If you're having trouble getting a shot because of low light, Shoot RAW. Go to your highest usable ISO and use exposure compensation to lower the exposure. Take it down by a maximum of 1.0 steps. The resulting image will look massively underexposed on camera (naturally) but when you edit in your workflow software, you'll have a lot less noise and greater definition/contrast than you would if you shot at the "correct" level, or close to it.

It does make a noticable difference the only real downside is being unable to "chimp" your images as you shoot.
 
#19
I find Jpeg's fine if I'm shooting "easy" subjects and wanting "straight" images, snapshots if you like. If you're pushing the envelope on speeds, exposure or whatever RAW gives you a little bit of a safety margin for error, if you want to play with digital imaging, HDR, effects from A to Z then you really need to shoot RAW. In some circumstances the size advantage of the jpg option can also be handy - Where you're going to be shooting a lot of continuous exposure sequences for instance.

90% of the time I leave the camera in RAW.