Planters?

#2
Shirt (long sleeves) with tie, trousers and shoes (oh don't forget your pants and socks to!!)

That was what planters was in my last place*



* disclaimer on my part if you end up on duty for 3 years for getting it wrong!
 
#3
Or dry roasted peanuts..
Pretty sure its long sleeves tie and toosers though.
 
#4
methilman said:
Shirt (long sleeves) with tie, trousers and shoes (oh don't forget your pants and socks to!!)
That's certainly what it's always been in messes I've visited, including the old Tamar mess in Hong Kong as I recall
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#5
I've also seen evening trousers, cummerbund, dress shirt no black tie called 'planters' - bit like 'red sea rig'.

As with all these things if in doubt ask your host (or the PMC/Mess sec) what they mean.
 
T

the_mentalist

Guest
#6
Depending on the Mess/RSM, at my place it is trousers, long sleeved shirt, no tie and no jacket, however I have also seen Regimental/Mess polo shirts worn in Planters.

As already said, if in doubt ask............it saves embarrassment and port fines! :oops:
 
T

the_mentalist

Guest
#7
Sorry for my last reply, I stumbled on this question on google and didn't realise this was the Officers Mess, the dress code I have listed is acceptable in the Sgts' Mess.
 
#8
In the officers' mess it is a long sleeved shirt with a tie. Imagine sugar or coffee plantation owners, (psychogically or socially) unable to chill out to any great degree, just removing their jacket during a function on a warm summer's evening. That's "planter's order".
 
#9
Believe with short sleeves/sleeves rolled up this is known as "farmers' order".
 
#10
I believe with trousers rolled up, and sleeves rolled up is "cockle pickers order."
 
#11
So with tie rolled up would it be "Dilbert order"?
 
#12
UOTC - smart trousers and shoes, decent shirt with a collar, sleeves folded up just above the elbow, no tie.....

Supposedly what a planter could tolerate in a hot and humid evening in (say) Malaya - just smart enough. In particular I can't imagine too many real planters wearing a tie in 95F and 100% humidity.

But what to drink - Pimms might be common in the evening, a long G&T is the obvious answer, but not if the smell of juniper berries makes you sick. Some gins are light on juniper, but what's the choice...........
 
#13
You might not be able to imagine a planter in a tie in 95F/100% humidity. However that is exactly what they did wear. Shirt sleeves were not rolled up because of insect bites. I have this on the good authority of my late great-uncle who was in Malaya from 1935-1940 and 1946-1954
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#14
Cuddles said:
You might not be able to imagine a planter in a tie in 95F/100% humidity. However that is exactly what they did wear. Shirt sleeves were not rolled up because of insect bites.
Yes indeedy. We were banned from wearing short-sleeved shirts in Belize after sundown because of the insects and we certainly wore ties for most of the year.
 
#15
cpunk said:
Cuddles said:
You might not be able to imagine a planter in a tie in 95F/100% humidity. However that is exactly what they did wear. Shirt sleeves were not rolled up because of insect bites.
Yes indeedy. We were banned from wearing short-sleeved shirts in Belize after sundown because of the insects and we certainly wore ties for most of the year.
Yes, I should explain it was my referring to dressing in planters' order whilst on exercise in Belize, that led to the old fellah and I discussing his experience. We probably would not have turned to the delightful topic of sartorialness otherwise. We would instead have limited our conversation to a desultory question about "what I was planning to do with my life rather than messing around in the Army" as he charmingly put it!
 
#17
smudge67 said:
I believe with trousers rolled up, and sleeves rolled up is "cockle pickers order."
I think you have to be floating near Morecambe to qualify for 'cockle pickers order'.






Is that my coat? Why thank you.
 
#18
When wearing a jacket, but not a tie, in Planters, we were required to wear open shirt collars outside and over the jacket collar. Definite need for a clean collar at this point.
Can only put that down to what some CO must have done at school, as that was exactly how it was at my school.
Somewhere still in the comfort zone therefore.

On the subject of cockle pickers, we took part in a quiz night in camp once a week whilst in Iraq. There was a prize for the best team name. One of the funniest - shouldn't have been, given the deaths involved - was "Morecambe Bay Cockle Pickers Second XI".
 

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