Plane Crash in Canada

#1
Last night I sat watching the events unfolding with my fingers crossed that there were some survivors.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4740381.stm

Thankfully all 300+ passengers and crew escaped.

This is testament to the safety features of modern airliners and the training of the crew.

Having said that, they were French, and like rats deserting the proverbial sinking ship...;)
 
#2
Happened in my back yard, so to speak..

just ten minutes from my place..plane overshot the runway in adverse weather conditions, some say it got hit by lightning as it touched down knocking out all electrics...Not the first time a plane has done the ' off road' bit, here.. happened a few years back..

I remember that one as well..more serious with loss of life then.. thankfully all survived this one with only bumps and bruises..though the eleation is tempered by the fact that they were Frenchies...
 
#3
Scary though, even if it was lightening strike, it still shouldn't happen! The technology is supposedly robust enough to handle it
 
#4
And their were some brits on it as well glad they made it out .Your own fault for flying frog :lol:
 
#5
Amusingly the foam-flecked jingoists of mil.com are blaming it on the "damn French" already because it was an Airbus. :roll:
 
#6
Shame, especially as a fair bit of it is made in the UK
 
#7
Oneshot said:
Scary though, even if it was lightening strike, it still shouldn't happen! The technology is supposedly robust enough to handle it
How? Ever tried to stop a lightening bolt? You can't ground an aircraft which is in flight; but if the aircraft is relatively low over the ground, a lightening bolt can pass through an aircraft(using the airframe as a conductor) before it hits the ground, and can destroy many of the aircrfat systems in the process. There is no technology to prevent this - it's just a hazard associated with air travel. There are some excellent clips of a Korean airliner being struck by lightening around the WWW somewhere which illustrates this perfectly.
 
#8
Crusty(LE) said:
Oneshot said:
Scary though, even if it was lightening strike, it still shouldn't happen! The technology is supposedly robust enough to handle it
How? Ever tried to stop a lightening bolt? You can't ground an aircraft which is in flight; but if the aircraft is relatively low over the ground, a lightening bolt can pass through an aircraft(using the airframe as a conductor) before it hits the ground, and can destroy many of the aircrfat systems in the process. There is no technology to prevent this - it's just a hazard associated with air travel. There are some excellent clips of a Korean airliner being struck by lightening around the WWW somewhere which illustrates this perfectly.
The witnesses said that all the power went, which is why it couldn't stop - with fly by wire systems this shouldn't happen, they are all supposed to be protected (can't go into the technology, you will have to take my word)
 
#9
Some witnesses speculated on a lightning strike - but no-one reported same.

Several other witnesses said it seemd to land further down the runway than any other they'd seen.

Poor conditions and all that, but pilot error is a strong possibility. At least they all got out.
 
#11
tomahawk6 said:
The airline Air France isnt called Air Chance for no reason. :wink:
Ha, ha, T6. Good to see you. Just leave the Frogs alone, you were happy enough to have their help in the Revolutionary War (not you personally, I assume)

"French military involvement in the war proved decisive, though disastrous for the French economy." Wikipedia
 
#13
Even with fly by wire, there are still hydralic accumulators on the brake systems, which means, even when you have lost the electrical services or the fuses have gone, the pilots should still have use of the brakes, added to that reverse thrust is powered by the engines and engines work independently of the electrical system...
Lots of "witness accounts" of the aircraft "floating" or touching down well beyond the normal area well up the run way, now the conditions on the day were not good, so a strong or sudden tail wind component can cause a float.... which can get critical on a day when its slick on the run way and your a heavy aircraft needing a long deceleration run..... in the simplest terms you have 2 options, to go arround, which is to get airbourne again and perform a missed approach, or to commit to the landing, with the risk you might not have enough run way available which could be seen as what may possibly have occured here, you end up running off the end of the run way!
.... but speculating is not good of course, so who knows, good to see every one got out and no injuries, that is the most important thing!
 
#14
Hi Hackle been awhile. I agree their help was critical to winning. There are some days that I do think that I helped row Washington across the Delaware hehe. One would think though that bailing the French out of trouble in two world wars would make us even. :)
 
#16
gearupflapup said:
Even with fly by wire, there are still hydralic accumulators on the brake systems, which means, even when you have lost the electrical services or the fuses have gone, the pilots should still have use of the brakes, added to that reverse thrust is powered by the engines and engines work independently of the electrical system...
Lots of "witness accounts" of the aircraft "floating" or touching down well beyond the normal area well up the run way, now the conditions on the day were not good, so a strong or sudden tail wind component can cause a float.... which can get critical on a day when its slick on the run way and your a heavy aircraft needing a long deceleration run..... in the simplest terms you have 2 options, to go arround, which is to get airbourne again and perform a missed approach, or to commit to the landing, with the risk you might not have enough run way available which could be seen as what may possibly have occured here, you end up running off the end of the run way!
.... but speculating is not good of course, so who knows, good to see every one got out and no injuries, that is the most important thing!
Agreed. Seems to me that the pilots might well be interviewing at McDonalds before Xmas. Well done to to the trolley dollies though for getting everyone out more or less in one piece. A marked constrast to their response can be seen in todays other report of a Malaysian Airlines flight from KL to Oz- the cabin crew got on the floor and started praying when their 747 hit some clear air turbulence and dropped a couple of hundred feet.

Back to the Toronto incident, I would have imagined that the Frogs' aversion to waiting in line and coupled with their abject cowardice would have resulted in numerous crush injuries. Conversely the Canadians on board would probably still be inside politely saying "No. Please, after you... Buddy" to their fellow passengers as the flames licked their ankles, so the cabin crew had their work cut out..
 
#17
Sounds a lot like the American A.L. crash at Little Rock a bit back.

Flight 1420, an American Airlines MD-82, leaves Dallas-Fort Worth for Little Rock two hours late due to thunderstorms. To keep the airline schedules on track, the American Airlines dispatcher tells the crew to "expedite their arrival" to beat the storms to the Little Rock airfield. It's a short hop and radar weather data shows a clear corridor, or a "bowling alley," as the dispatcher calls it, through which Flight 1420 should be able to fly to its destination. Captain Richard Buschmann and co-pilot Michael Origel prepare to beat the storm. One hundred miles from Little Rock, as 1420 begins its descent, severe thunderstorms close in on the airfield, bringing with them dangerously unstable winds. Racing the Storm recreates the flight to Little Rock, analyzing the decisions made by Captain Buschmann and co-pilot Origel. Interviews reveal the harrowing experience of passengers in the cabin of Flight 1420 while experts, including members of the NTSB, provide insight into industry standards and practice. Was the crash due to pilot error? Intent on staying on schedule and getting passengers to their destination, could the pilots have made the bad decision to fly into the eye of a storm in the face of severe crosswinds?
http://www.nationalgeographic.com.hk/watch/SeriesSchedule.asp?Seriesid=437

It just ain't cool to land in a severe thunderstorm...pilot's call...but HE WAS the first one at the scene of the accident.
 
#18
Just heard the Chief of Airport Fire Service on the radio, his first crew was on the scene in 52 seconds!!

Either they anticipated the crash, of they have some pretty fast fire engines in Canada. Good drills whatever the reason.
 
#19
Shame that "Frenchperson" wasn't on board...
 

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