Plan Ex Process

#1
Got my Main Board coming up in January and I'm struggling with the Plan Ex; not in terms of the Maths side,
but coming to a solution quickly and getting it all down on paper.

Has anyone got a process they go through when doing them, I've tried reading the narrative first then starting with the sketch map, then aims, factors, COA, ARRT and then plan. It just seems to take me too long, and I struggle to get down more than 2 COAs.

Thanks for any help.
 
#2
Got my Main Board coming up in January and I'm struggling with the Plan Ex; not in terms of the Maths side,
but coming to a solution quickly and getting it all down on paper.

Has anyone got a process they go through when doing them, I've tried reading the narrative first then starting with the sketch map, then aims, factors, COA, ARRT and then plan. It just seems to take me too long, and I struggle to get down more than 2 COAs.

Thanks for any help.
This might seem obvious, and you might already be doing it however:

Why not break down the time you are allocated into sections- X mins for the sketch map, X mins for the factors analysis, X mins to develop COAs. Be brutal with yourself, once the time comes, move on! Leave yourself X mins at the end to go back through and check workings out, confirm the plan makes sense etc.

Just a suggestion.
 
#3
The plan itself is a red herring. As long as you have something top present the you will be ok. The scenario carries a lot of weight.

How are you getting on with the SDT side of things. Have you been told how to do it without the triangle.
 
#4
This might seem obvious, and you might already be doing it however:

Why not break down the time you are allocated into sections- X mins for the sketch map, X mins for the factors analysis, X mins to develop COAs. Be brutal with yourself, once the time comes, move on! Leave yourself X mins at the end to go back through and check workings out, confirm the plan makes sense etc.

Just a suggestion.
I like that idea i think the problem for me is reading the narrative so if i can cut down my time on that your idea would be really beneficial.

The plan itself is a red herring. As long as you have something top present the you will be ok. The scenario carries a lot of weight.

How are you getting on with the SDT side of things. Have you been told how to do it without the triangle.
I'm fairly decent at sdt sort of figured it out on my own just by practising them, what method do you use for them?
 
#5
The trick is the all divide into 60.

Ie 15 mph - 4 mins per mile

12 mph = 5 mins per mile

There are only so many of them so just learn and practice them against different distances and you'll do well.

Like I said the plan is a red herring. Most candidates have about 4 plans down on paper and none of them actually achieve the objective and they've wasted time on not learning the narrative or doing SDT.

The biggest mistake is to think you can do the SDT triangle in your head under pressure, it just won't happen and some crazy figures will come out of this process.

Create a plan that achieves your main aim, it will have errors but the syndicate leader will let you work them out. You only present a small part so they might not even discover the errors.
 
#6
Had my briefing report over the last week and this is what it said

"His planning exercise could be improved by ensuring that he takes the time to analyse all of the aims and factors before moving on to developing his plan in order to make sure critical details are not missed"
 
#7
Take notes while reading the narrative so you don't have to go back over it. Factors, aims, pax, vehicle speeds etc then when you move to the map its all there. Most of the text is unimportant it is all about getting through the guff and picking up the main points quickly and that will come with practice. The cadets have loads of planning Ex's online with solutions if you have a hunt.

The 1st one I did was forest fire without ever being given the method and my plan was crap but I was able to pull it back by being able to present clearly what little I had and a strong involvement in the group plan. Once shown the method they liked people to use it all fell into place.
 
#8
All you need to do is write them down and make sure your plan meets them. If your primary aim is X then your plan must achieve X.
 
#9
Some 'top tips'

1) Mark the key parts of the scenario on the write up you are given as you go
2) Pull objectives out as you read and then prioritise - don't miss implied objectives
3) Look to get 3 plans in rough, (literally got to A, do X gotot B do Y) evaluate and make only one a full plan
4) Learn the scenario and your plan.
5) Even if you screw it up present confidently- I realised as I walked to the front I'd made a huge error, but managed to brazen it out.
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#11
There is some really dogshi* advice here. The method given at the Briefing is the one you should use. See Practice AOSB Planning Exercises Needed for a reiteration.

A few points:

Use your sketch map to generate COAs. If you've put all the information from your factors on the sketch map - e.g. speeds, distances, times, resources - the COAs should drop out very easily. You need to generate at least 3 COAs.

Show all your working on the answer sheet. Don't write anything on the scenario: it won't get seen when it's marked. It is important that you produce the best written solution you can. A sound written solution demonstrates your ability to systematically work your way through a problem under pressure. When you're questioned at the map, you are demonstrating whether you can think on your feet, which is slightly different.

Do make sure you consider each piece of information you are given, and how it has an impact. Does it imply a task, a risk or a constraint?

There are no shortcuts. Practise.
 
#13
Hey, what does the 'ARRT' stage mean? I've just finished my briefing and i don't recall seeing that.
ARRT stands for "Aims, Risks, Realism, Time".

This used to be a mandatory part of the plan-ex and was included as a table within the bottom left of the A3 you're given.

However, they have now removed it as it was considered unnecessary and a big time waster as it was essentially re-writing the same things. Since you have already covered your aims, risks/opportunities in your factors/deductions section and timings in your courses of action (COA) section.

Long story short, ARRT is now irrelevant.
 
#14
ARRT stands for "Aims, Risks, Realism, Time".

This used to be a mandatory part of the plan-ex and was included as a table within the bottom left of the A3 you're given.

However, they have now removed it as it was considered unnecessary and a big time waster as it was essentially re-writing the same things. Since you have already covered your aims, risks/opportunities in your factors/deductions section and timings in your courses of action (COA) section.

Long story short, ARRT is now irrelevant.
Ah, thank you. you've cleared that up for me.
 

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