Pistols Hot or Not-Show Us Yer Kit (real or for those in England, imagined)

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
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My new Glock G48 arrived yesterday. It's got the single stack 10 round magazine and slim grips.
It's my first Glock, but after spending a couple of hours familiarising myself with the action and procedures, it feels like this gun was made for me. It just feels right.
I'll run a few boxes of 124 grain through it this weekend and maybe order a Ghost 3.5 connector to make a comparison with the trigger weight, but it feels smooth and light out of the box.
 
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My new Glock G48 arrived yesterday. It's got the single stack 10 round magazine and slim grips.
It's my first Glock, but after spending a couple of hours familiarising myself with the action and procedures, it feels like this gun was made for me. It just feels right.
I'll run a few boxes of 124 grain through it this weekend and maybe order a Ghost 3.5 connector to make a comparison with the trigger weight, but it feels smooth and light out of the box.
I'm a bit worried by the length of your fingernails.

They need either to be trimmed to a manly length, or shaped with emery boards to Cruella De Ville proportions and properly varnished.

The Glock looks OK despite all that.
 

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
I'm a bit worried by the length of your fingernails.

They need either to be trimmed to a manly length, or shaped with emery boards to Cruella De Ville proportions and properly varnished.

The Glock looks OK despite all that.
I was wondering if anyone would comment on them. I've been a guitarist for fifty years, my old nail care habits are hard to break.
 

Carbon 6

Old-Salt
After spending a morning running in my new Glock G48, I noticed an older gentleman on the range shooting an old black powder cap and ball revolver. As I watched him, I became fascinated by the whole reloading and shooting process, so I asked him to tell me something about muzzle loading revolvers. He was kind enough (as shooters generally are), to show me his gun, an original 1860s Remington, and give me the information needed if I were to become involved in the black powder sport.
Anyway, here is my latest acquisition. It's an Italian Pietta Replica Remington 1858 .44. The 1858 is really the year that the patent was issued, most of the original guns were manufactured in the 1860s.
I have a feeling that my Glock and Browning semis might become safe queens.

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4(T)

LE
After spending a morning running in my new Glock G48, I noticed an older gentleman on the range shooting an old black powder cap and ball revolver. As I watched him, I became fascinated by the whole reloading and shooting process, so I asked him to tell me something about muzzle loading revolvers. He was kind enough (as shooters generally are), to show me his gun, an original 1860s Remington, and give me the information needed if I were to become involved in the black powder sport.
Anyway, here is my latest acquisition. It's an Italian Pietta Replica Remington 1858 .44. The 1858 is really the year that the patent was issued, most of the original guns were manufactured in the 1860s.
I have a feeling that my Glock and Browning semis might become safe queens.

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Yes, that is the cutting edge of pistol shooting in UK.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
No photos, but a few reminiscences you may like:

In 1987 I took up pistol shooting in Australia. Getting a pistol was so easy it scared me. Basically a form from a gun club and a trip to the shop. Within 3 months it had to be inspected at a police station to check serial numbers.

No need for a gun safe. mine lay on the bedside table with a full magazine.

If you needed a gun for “self protection” you just applied for a self protection licence. Maybe you were worried about being beaten up. Most bookies carried a pistol 24x7. So did lots of other people. It was even easier than the gun club route. You just needed some flimsy excuse. Having a criminal record didnt preclude you from getting a self protection licence either.

The banks until just before I arrived insisted that all male tellers do a half day training then were handed a pistol and six rounds. They took them home, kept them in the house, and took them to work in a holster, just like wearing a tie. Almost every teller in CBA carried a pistol to and from work, on the train.

 

HSF

LE
Australia seeme to have a very non PC approach to gun ownership,in that they do not see all gun owners or applicants as homicidal phsicopaths & a threat to the establishment? Most strange indeed
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Australia seeme to have a very non PC approach to gun ownership,in that they do not see all gun owners or applicants as homicidal phsicopaths & a threat to the establishment? Most strange indeed
Not since Port Arthur
 
I'm a bit worried by the length of your fingernails.

They need either to be trimmed to a manly length, or shaped with emery boards to Cruella De Ville proportions and properly varnished.

The Glock looks OK despite all that.
I wish I'd known about this p'tick'ler shade of nail varnish back then:
BloodOfMyEnemies.jpg
 
No photos, but a few reminiscences you may like:

In 1987 I took up pistol shooting in Australia. Getting a pistol was so easy it scared me. Basically a form from a gun club and a trip to the shop. Within 3 months it had to be inspected at a police station to check serial numbers.

No need for a gun safe. mine lay on the bedside table with a full magazine.

If you needed a gun for “self protection” you just applied for a self protection licence. Maybe you were worried about being beaten up. Most bookies carried a pistol 24x7. So did lots of other people. It was even easier than the gun club route. You just needed some flimsy excuse. Having a criminal record didnt preclude you from getting a self protection licence either.

The banks until just before I arrived insisted that all male tellers do a half day training then were handed a pistol and six rounds. They took them home, kept them in the house, and took them to work in a holster, just like wearing a tie. Almost every teller in CBA carried a pistol to and from work, on the train.

It has changed quite considerably since then. I am just entering the final stage of obtaining a handgun at the moment. I have the endorsement on my licence which allows me to shoot under supervision with a club gun. No self-protection application, primarily only security guard or sport; 6 month probation period; observation by firearms club during that time (they have to endorse your Permission To Acquire form), separate storage from longarms storage; burglar alarm (or CCTV) to storage area which has been checked by police, requirement to attend a set number of club shoots per year (actual number depends on number of handguns owned).
 
So, on a complete side-note, is there any advantage at all to the heel magazine release at the base of the pistol grip common to European pistols such as the old Hi-Power as opposed to the thumb release up near the trigger guard as commonly found on this side of the Atlantic? (My Hi Power has a thumb release, but I recall the one I had in Irish service was a heel release)
 

Chicken

Old-Salt
I remember hearing about when Bank Tellers had a Revolver under the counter in New Zealand.They used to fire them once a year down an alleyway between the Bank and the Butchers shop.

My Dad gave me a inert Mill's Bomb as a kid and I took it into the Bank to show my Great Uncle who worked there.I hung it on the belt of my School Uniform proud as punch.

When I got my gun licence at 16,you could just walk into a Gun shop and if you had the money straight out again with a G3/Slr/AK etc.Dad
So, on a complete side-note, is there any advantage at all to the heel magazine release at the base of the pistol grip common to European pistols such as the old Hi-Power as opposed to the thumb release up near the trigger guard as commonly found on this side of the Atlantic? (My Hi Power has a thumb release, but I recall the one I had in Irish service was a heel release)
It pops the mag into the cupped hand,making it supposedly harder to drop from horseback.

Sadly I don't own a horse but have two pistols that have heal release magazine catches.On the range there is no disadvantage, you get used to it pretty quickly.
 

4(T)

LE
So, on a complete side-note, is there any advantage at all to the heel magazine release at the base of the pistol grip common to European pistols such as the old Hi-Power as opposed to the thumb release up near the trigger guard as commonly found on this side of the Atlantic? (My Hi Power has a thumb release, but I recall the one I had in Irish service was a heel release)

Heel release means that the magazine is already grasped by the hand that operates the release. IIRC it was originally something to do with magazine security for mounted soldiers - most of the early pistol designs being developed for military contracts. It just became the de facto standard in most 20th century military and commercial European pistols.

I have a feeling that button release was inhibited in Europe for while by being someone's patent - possibly John Browning.

Not sure the Browning HP ever had a heel release amongst its variations? Many of the military versions had a lanyard ring or loop there.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Not sure the Browning HP ever had a heel release amongst its variations?
Never heard of one either, although Browning did design other sidearms with that kind of release, the Model 1910 for example.

@California_Tanker, could you post a couple of photos of your pistol ?
 

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