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Pioneer Corps in Europe WW2 1944 - 1945

onesixfive

Swinger
I've inherited some medals & service records of my Grandad's who served with The Pioneer Corps during WW2.
The medals include a France & Germany Star, and his records show overseas service between 15 Jun 1944 & 31 Aug 1945.
I take the codes to mean he was with the 21st Army group in North West Europe - hence the star - but the rest of the code means nothing (dates?)
He was possibly attached to 160 & 282 during this time.
I can find nothing online.

Would anyone please know WHERE in Europe he would be based?
What the Pioneer Corps would be doing during that time?
I note they did not come home on VE day in May, but stayed on until August - was that purely logistical?

Any information gratefully received.
 

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Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
The Royal Pioneer Corps Association (Google will be able to help) should be able to give you extracts from the relevant Company War Diaries which would say where and what they the Coy was doing at any given time.
 
AWOL twice in the last weeks before D Day, bit of a lad was he?

The RLC Museum might also be able to help but is in the process of moving to Worthy Down right now:

 
Your Grandads service records should be easy for the Regimental Association to follow up on. It looks like he went to Normandy 9 days after D Day.
Heavier engineering work remained with the Royal Engineers, but the light engineering tasks of the Pioneer Corps included building anti-aircraft emplacements on the Home Front, working on the Mulberry harbours for D-Day, and serving during beach assaults in France and Italy. Pioneers also carried stretchers, built airfields, repaired railways, and moved stores and supplies.

By May 1945, the corps included around 180,000 British personnel and 400,000 Commonwealth members. The following year, it gained a 'Royal' prefix in recognition of its wartime contribution.
 
AWOL twice in the last weeks before D Day, bit of a lad was he?

The RLC Museum might also be able to help but is in the process of moving to Worthy Down right now:

I did notice this, but tried to save the family honour and all that. Bet there was a woman involved!
 
Is that an Orlando Norrie. If so where's he hidden the mouse?
It's a Cuneo - 'Pioneers, Sword Beach, D-Day'

Original is in the HQ RLC Officers' Mess. No idea where the mouse is but I think he's mine detecting up front.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
It can be hard enough to spot the Cuneo mouse even when standing a metre in front of a full size painting. You're never going to see it on a screen at this scale.
 

Chef

LE
Yup, sorry it appears Orlando passed on in 1901 according to Wiki!

So unlikely to have painted much of WWII.

Mr Cuneo's dead too 1907-1996.
 
A major effort for the Corps in NW Europe was smoke generation.
 

Chef

LE
A major effort for the Corps in NW Europe was smoke generation.

From the smoke generation to the woke generation in fifty years or so.

My tin hat and DUKW?
 
I've no idea which battle this was but a WWII Chelsea Pensioner told me about an attack his battalion was on that got stalled and how impressed he was seeing a Guards battalion move through their positions at the double with bayonets fixed. Only for their attack to stall because they ran into a Pioneer company that wouldn't let them onto a bridge that they were repairing and were defending with fists, picks and shovels.
 

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