Pierrepoint on now.

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#1
Showing now on ITV Central. Only been on a few minutes but its shaping up to look very good. Interesting contrast to todays pampered lags!!
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#3
I stand corrected FS, I expect i should have watched the whole thing before posting a title like that!! my own fault for jumping the gun. Still I suppose its started a debate! :wink:
 
#4
I recall seeing Timothy Spall being interviewed about his role in this drama. As with everything he does, his portrayal is brilliant.
 
#5
For the first fifty-six years of this century the name Pierrepoint appeared on the short list of Home Office qualified executioners.

Albert Pierrepoint became an executioner in 1931 and held the office of Official Executioner until 1956.

He carried out over 400 executions. Now, after many years, he should be introduced to the 'Big Brother Ouse' because my daughters are watching it at the moment. I want to watch Albert work his way through the stretching of the rope, the 2 minute task, hood and drop the lot.

Henry, Thomas and Albert would put one in the ' Ouse' right now. Bring it on.

Ooooh !
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#6
Got to agree with you Bovvy, its rivetting stuff.
 
#7
' I have seen prison officers faint on the scaffold, strong men weep, and a woman prison officer crying helplessly. I have known prison doctors who could not examine the body after execution because the beat of their own heart was obliterating anything they could distinguish.I have felt overpowering sorrow for the victims of crime, for little children murdered.., '

Good man.
 
#8
Albert wasn't the last hangman. Two historic hangings took place at the same time in two different cities at 0800 on the 13th of August 1964.

They were conducted at Manchester and Liverpool by two assistants who succeeded Albert Pierrepoint.
 

JINGO

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#9
Tried to edit title to correct historical inaccuracy and failed miserably! Still I take your point FS and JW.
 
#10
Very good film I thought. Deserves more than the 3 stars given to it by Radio Times.

Although it is inaccurate in places, it is very well done and Spall gives an excellent performance.
 
#12
I have in my possession the death watch journal for R mc gladdery, last to hang in N Ireland, cough alledgedly.
It's nothing more than a little grey HMSO book.An interesting point is the last entry everynight"prisoner slept soundly"....how the f... did he manage that
 
#13
Mazur_UK said:
Very good film I thought. Deserves more than the 3 stars given to it by Radio Times.

Although it is inaccurate in places, it is very well done and Spall gives an excellent performance.
Just out of curiosity..what were the inaccurancies
 
#14
Just about the whole of the war time scenes are totally inaccurate. The No2 was actually a Warrant Officer rather than an officer and the executions didn't take place on a make shift scaffold in a warehouse but in a German Nick.
 
#15
Baldrick66 said:
Just about the whole of the war time scenes are totally inaccurate. The No2 was actually a Warrant Officer rather than an officer and the executions didn't take place on a make shift scaffold in a warehouse but in a German Nick.
IIRC, Albert was only supposed to be a consultant/observer at Nuremburg. But was so appalled by the the way the first executions were carried out that he volunteered to do the rest of them, so they would be carried out efficiently.

A master of his craft. I believe his personal best, from shaking hands with the criminal in the cell to pulling the lever, was measured in seconds... 8O
 
#16
ordinaryforces said:
Mazur_UK said:
Very good film I thought. Deserves more than the 3 stars given to it by Radio Times.

Although it is inaccurate in places, it is very well done and Spall gives an excellent performance.
Just out of curiosity..what were the inaccurancies
As said above.

Plus the whole Pierrepoint breaking down thing never happened.

He resigned over a pay disputed in the end. He was offered £1 compensation by a prison after a cancelled hanging when in Scotland he would have been offered the original fee.
 
#17
These so-called documentary makers will not let facts get in the way,of a good story.The hangings took place at Hameln jail,I believe,which could not be described as a 'warehouse' IMHO.

Baldrick66 said:
Just about the whole of the war time scenes are totally inaccurate. The No2 was actually a Warrant Officer rather than an officer and the executions didn't take place on a make shift scaffold in a warehouse but in a German Nick.
 
#18
Baldrick66 said:
Just about the whole of the war time scenes are totally inaccurate. The No2 was actually a Warrant Officer rather than an officer and the executions didn't take place on a make shift scaffold in a warehouse but in a German Nick.
I think you are mixing up the US executions carried our in the gymnasium at Nuremberg Prison by this chap

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Woods

with the executions carried out at Hameln and other locations during 1945-49 in the British occupied areas of Germany by Albert Pierrepoint
 
#19
Mazur_UK said:
Plus the whole Pierrepoint breaking down thing never happened.

He resigned over a pay disputed in the end. He was offered £1 compensation by a prison after a cancelled hanging when in Scotland he would have been offered the original fee.
The drama showed that his wife (who was angry that he did not get paid when he had turned up to hang someone who was reprieved) suggested he could use this as grounds for his resignation and, that way, save the embarrassment of admitting his distress.

FrankCastle said:
A master of his craft. I believe his personal best, from shaking hands with the criminal in the cell to pulling the lever, was measured in seconds... 8O
In last night's drama I recall his father's record was 14 seconds. The drama showed Albert reducing this record to 7 or 7.5 seconds.
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
bovvy said:
.
FrankCastle said:
A master of his craft. I believe his personal best, from shaking hands with the criminal in the cell to pulling the lever, was measured in seconds... 8O
In last night's drama I recall his father's record was 14 seconds. The drama showed Albert reducing this record to 7 or 7.5 seconds.
Pierrepoint learnt his trade assisting his uncle Tom and is credited with the quickest hanging on record when he, assisted by Sid Dernley, executed James Inglis in only 7 seconds on the 8th of May 1951 at Strangeways in Manchester


muhandis89 said:
These so-called documentary makers will not let facts get in the way,of a good story.The hangings took place at Hameln jail,I believe,which could not be described as a 'warehouse' IMHO.

Baldrick66 said:
Just about the whole of the war time scenes are totally inaccurate. The No2 was actually a Warrant Officer rather than an officer and the executions didn't take place on a make shift scaffold in a warehouse but in a German Nick.
During World War II, Pierrepoint was called upon to assist with or be principal in the hangings of the 16 American soldiers executed for murder and rape at Shepton Mallet military prison in Somerset.

After the war Albert made several visits to Austria and Germany and on the 13th of December 1945 hanged 13 German war criminals at Hameln jail including Irma Greese, Elizabeth Volkenrath and Juana Boreman and ten men including the "Beast of Belsen" Josef Kramer. He is thought to have hanged around 200 Nazis in all.

Irma Greese showed no remorse, and her final words to Pierrepoint were: "Quick, get it over".

Mazur_UK said:
Plus the whole Pierrepoint breaking down thing never happened.

He resigned over a pay disputed in the end. He was offered £1 compensation by a prison after a cancelled hanging when in Scotland he would have been offered the original fee.

Pierrepoint resigned over a disagreement about fees in 1956. He had gone to Strangeways on a cold day in January 1956 to hang Thomas Bancroft. He arrived at the prison only to find that Bancroft was reprieved. He claimed the full fee of £15, (more than £200 at today's prices), but was offered just £1 in out-of-pocket expenses by the under-sheriff of Lancashire.

Pierrepoint appealed to his employers, the Prison Commission, who refused to get involved. The under-sheriff sent him a cheque for £4 in final settlement. But to Pierrepoint this was the end of the road and a huge insult to his pride in his position as Britain's Chief Executioner.
 

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