Piece of shit AGA

Truxx

LE
Have to disagree with that. Used properly there is nothing an Aga can't cook beautifully.
Used properly there is nothing that a No1 burner cannot cook beautifully (eh @Joker62 ?) but that is not the point.

But there is a very good reason that the majority of households, cafes, bakeries, restraunts and cookhouses (sorry Dining Facilities) do not have them, a reality reflected in the very title of this thread.

You may have deduced at this point that I am not a fan. They are, in my opinion, an overpriced answer to a question no one was asking and the only reason for their survival into the 21st century is their regular appearance in such rags as "Beautiful Homes" and "Country Life".

An SS100 Jag is a fine thing, but a very expensive way of doing what can be done equally well by a VW Golf.
 
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Truxx

LE
I sense, like so many things these days, contributors are falling into one of two categories. The ayes and the nays.


What we are supposed to be doing is assising our VOR aga owning colleague to get to the bottom of what might laughingly be described as his cooker.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Used properly there is nothing that a No1 burner cannot cook beautifully (eh @Joker62 ?) but that is not the point.

But there is a very good reason that the majority of households, cafes, bakeries, restraunts and cookhoudes (sorry Dining Facilities) do not have them, a reality reflected in the very title of this thread.

You may have deduced at this point that I am not a fan. They are, in my opinion, an overpriced answer to a question no one was asking and the only reason for their survival into the 21st century is their regular appearance in such rags as "Beautiful Homes" and "Country Life".

An SS100 Jag is a fine thing, but a very expensive way of doing what can be done equally well by a VW Golf.
You are Mr. GRB (who insists that a car is merely a means of travelling from A to B) and I claim my £5
 
They have about enough calorific value between them to do 1 roast chicken (badly). Must try harder.
Used properly there is nothing that a No1 burner cannot cook beautifully (eh @Joker62 ?) but that is not the point.

But there is a very good reason that the majority of households, cafes, bakeries, restraunts and cookhoudes (sorry Dining Facilities) do not have them, a reality reflected in the very title of this thread.

You may have deduced at this point that I am not a fan. They are, in my opinion, an overpriced answer to a question no one was asking and the only reason for their survival into the 21st century is their regular appearance in such rags as "Beautiful Homes" and "Country Life".

An SS100 Jag is a fine thing, but a very expensive way of doing what can be done equally well by a VW Golf.
We are fortunate to have a large, basement kitchen that opens out to a garden, whereas most modern kitchens couldn't accommodate one. We pondered what sort of range to put in - we are both foodies - and realised that, whilst an Aga (other brands available) would be great, we couldn't afford one. Then just as we were about to buy a conventional range, a maiden Great Aunt died who left precisely enough money to buy a refurbished two-oven gas one, about 15 years ago. We are not a hotel nor a cafe, and not undertaking volume cooking. But we have cooked for a family reunion (about 30 people) and regularly host family dinners for 8-10 people, roasting something large and quite expensive. We have never found the Aga wanting; perhaps a little bit of forethought might be needed for larger numbers, but the the ovens are commodious and the hot plates take three shaped saucepans each. Or just serve salad.
 

Truxx

LE
We are fortunate to have a large, basement kitchen that opens out to a garden, whereas most modern kitchens couldn't accommodate one. We pondered what sort of range to put in - we are both foodies - and realised that, whilst an Aga (other brands available) would be great, we couldn't afford one. Then just as we were about to buy a conventional range, a maiden Great Aunt died who left precisely enough money to buy a refurbished two-oven gas one, about 15 years ago. We are not a hotel nor a cafe, and not undertaking volume cooking. But we have cooked for a family reunion (about 30 people) and regularly host family dinners for 8-10 people, roasting something large and quite expensive. We have never found the Aga wanting; perhaps a little bit of forethought might be needed for larger numbers, but the the ovens are commodious and the hot plates take three shaped saucepans each. Or just serve salad.
But

Were it not for the windfall you would be Neff or Bosch?
 

Truxx

LE
And would have replaced it by now. I don't love kitchen appliances usually, but i love our Aga. Does that make me a bad person?
You can have half a dozen Neffs for the price of an aga.

Not sure about bad. Soft in the head, certainly.

I had no idea I was so rabidly anti-aga.

Very odd. Must be the virus thingy.
 
Yep. The vast majority of people realise early on that they’re absolutely ******* shit and get rid.

To be fair ours came with the house and I thought it’d be more hassle to replace than to just put up with it.

New ones are eyewateringly expensive. 3 grand to refurb and convert ours was seemingly a bargain compared to the 15k for the new version.
15k? For an oven? FOR A F'KING OVEN?! You could get a new kitchen for that! Some people have more money than sense!
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
The 208 was a dog. Basically a 308 with a shitter engine and a dodgy turbo to meet Italian emission regulations.
to continue the analogy, your conversion is a similar cur.
 
In 1972, a dopey powerman was sent to prison by a military court for a crime he probably commited. This man promptly escaped from a maximum security stockade to the West Midlands underground. Today, still wanted by the government he survives as a retired sparks and peddlar of cold war dits. If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him....maybe you can hire A-Signaller."

I think cookers have a separate 50a single fuse in the main fuse board.
So easily replaced with a nail?
 
15k? For an oven? FOR A F'KING OVEN?! You could get a new kitchen for that! Some people have more money than sense!
Cheapskate.

Our kitchen cost £23k last year

And we have Bosch appliances including separate oven and combi oven/microwave/grill.

And no it's not a particularly big kitchen.
 

Mick9abf

War Hero
I have to say @Ravers that I base how good Aga’s are on the amount of retail outlets they have.

Based on this, and the fact that Aberdeen is filled with a significant quantity of affluent mongs thanks to the once booming oil industry who would, or their wives would buy anything expensive to beat the Jones’s and didn’t care about cost. The fact the Aga store in Aberdeen closed a couple of years ago tells me (which you are already aware of) that they are shit and even the most dim but tidy scheme bird married into money and refers to the microwave or takeaway menu knows they’re shit tells you everything you need to know.

Rip that ****** out once you’ve got it fixed, sell it working and get a gas/electric range cooker in its place. I fitted one in my old gaff which ran off J cylinders for the hob and had double lecky ovens. A twin set of 70kg cylinders with a switch over will last you 2-3 years with normal use.
 
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Ten pages in and I have to say I have been greatly enlightened.

I always thought Agas were luxury versions of what we called "the stove" in my Granny's house. That is they were fancy versions of those lumpen all-purpose ovens, hobs, boilers and heaters that sat in what used to be called the scullery (ie not the "dining room" which was only used once a year at Christmas). They were fed by your grandmother with a shovel full of coal (turf in my Granny's house) in the morning, maybe another in mid afternoon, raked down at night and throughout the day provided hot water for endless pots of tea, heat to warm the kitchen (the only place you could sit in as the rest of the house was freezing) and the means of drying the endless laundry steaming in front of it or hanging on the rail from the ceiling above it.

I now learn that far from being expensive versions these fine old-fashioned rough and ready pieces of kit, Agas are actually oil- or gas-fired, or *gasp!* electric, fashion items, that have all the inconveniences of the ignorant beasts that my Granny couldn't wait to get rid of when she finally did up her kitchen in 1977 and threw the old monstrosity out for a nice shiny four-ring cooker from the Co-op, but without any of the benefits or economy.

So what is the attraction of them, can anyone explain?
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Ten pages in and I have to say I have been greatly enlightened.

I always thought Agas were luxury versions of what we called "the stove" in my Granny's house. That is they were fancy versions of those lumpen all-purpose ovens, hobs, boilers and heaters that sat in what used to be called the scullery (ie not the "dining room" which was only used once a year at Christmas). They were fed by your grandmother with a shovel full of coal (turf in my Granny's house) in the morning, maybe another in mid afternoon, raked down at night and throughout the day provided hot water for endless pots of tea, heat to warm the kitchen (the only place you could sit in as the rest of the house was freezing) and the means of drying the endless laundry steaming in front of it or hanging on the rail from the ceiling above it.

I now learn that far from being expensive versions these fine old-fashioned rough and ready pieces of kit, Agas are actually oil- or gas-fired, or *gasp!* electric, fashion items, that have all the inconveniences of the ignorant beasts that my Granny couldn't wait to get rid of when she finally did up her kitchen in 1977 and threw the old monstrosity out for a nice shiny four-ring cooker from the Co-op, but without any of the benefits or economy.

So what is the attraction of them, can anyone explain?
That all purpose, does the cooking, ironing, pairing, rescues baby lambs, chicks and ducklings, warms the whole house, thing.

Plus, in the case of my first (oil) one, kept us in tea, coffee, hot water and hot food during a four day power cut and other shorter ones in rural North Wales.

It's not just a cooker.
 
Ten pages in and I have to say I have been greatly enlightened.

I always thought Agas were luxury versions of what we called "the stove" in my Granny's house. That is they were fancy versions of those lumpen all-purpose ovens, hobs, boilers and heaters that sat in what used to be called the scullery (ie not the "dining room" which was only used once a year at Christmas). They were fed by your grandmother with a shovel full of coal (turf in my Granny's house) in the morning, maybe another in mid afternoon, raked down at night and throughout the day provided hot water for endless pots of tea, heat to warm the kitchen (the only place you could sit in as the rest of the house was freezing) and the means of drying the endless laundry steaming in front of it or hanging on the rail from the ceiling above it.

I now learn that far from being expensive versions these fine old-fashioned rough and ready pieces of kit, Agas are actually oil- or gas-fired, or *gasp!* electric, fashion items, that have all the inconveniences of the ignorant beasts that my Granny couldn't wait to get rid of when she finally did up her kitchen in 1977 and threw the old monstrosity out for a nice shiny four-ring cooker from the Co-op, but without any of the benefits or economy.

So what is the attraction of them, can anyone explain?
As a snotty nose kid in the east end in the 50's, my paternal grannie had exactly what you describe, as did her daughter, my auntie, all through the 60's and 70's these lovely old Victorian inventions heated both houses admirably, they were part of my youth, memories of a more simpler time. Now in a big old house, in a semi rural setting, with a big kitchen, we raised 6 kids with a conventional 4 ring 2 oven electric stove, where did we go wrong?
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
As a snotty nose kid in the east end in the 50's, my paternal grannie had exactly what you describe, as did her daughter, my auntie, all through the 60's and 70's these lovely old Victorian inventions heated both houses admirably, they were part of my youth, memories of a more simpler time. Now in a big old house, in a semi rural setting, with a big kitchen, we raised 6 kids with a conventional 4 ring 2 oven electric stove, where did we go wrong?
Central heating?
 

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