Pics of the dogs

#1

So I've got to take a picture of a moving object for my camera course at college, What you think?

Bit blurred






Nice shadows of the dogs










Would have chosen this one hands down if Oisin had been more in the lense




The two stars of the photo's




 
#2
Great pictures of your dogs. Wheaten Terriers ???
No objection to posting here but there are a lot who would enjoy them on this thread:
ARRSE Kennel Club

Cheers!
 
#3
So I've got to take a picture of a moving object for my camera course at college, What you think?

Bit blurred






Nice shadows of the dogs










Would have chosen this one hands down if Oisin had been more in the lense


Great dogs. Blurriness can help convey a sense of movement. It can also help isolate the subject from the background. There are some nice scenic photos there with dogs in the foreground. The smaller the moving subject is compared to the background, the less emphasis on movement perhaps. To some extent it may depend how big the submitted print will be. Shadows are nice to have but in thinking about the brief for the exercise, there are other signs of movement, such as water splashes and sand kicked up by the dogs in motion, that help illustrate movement. They all have points of interest but I thought the above five particularly interesting. I wondered how bringing the dog "closer" by cropping the original would work, while retaining the shadow.
60336097_101571674875dog-cr.jpg
 
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#4

So I've got to take a picture of a moving object for my camera course at college, What you think?

Bit blurred






Nice shadows of the dogs










Would have chosen this one hands down if Oisin had been more in the lense




The two stars of the photo's




I’ve posted this one of our dog before on the other thread. Taken by my mate, who is a very handy photographer and has the gear. Captures the personality of the little man perfectly in my opinion.
19F5C9A6-498B-4F49-8C24-A57865B41597.jpeg
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#5
You need to rotate your pics so the horizon is straight. It’s especially obvious when the sea is the background.

Good pics but they’re all on the piss.
 
#6
Great pics and a handsome pair of furmonsters. Those mud flats look like great fun. I'd be in there with the dags, a screwdriver and a bottle of Tabasco scoffing clams or whatever else is lurking in there till we're completely sated.
 
#7
@brettarider - My favorite of the pictures is the one third from the bottom in which a dog is entirely in the air and the shadow is visible below.

One older but still used technique for capturing rapid movement is panning. One would move the camera to follow the speeding car, motorcycle , horse etc which results in a clearer picture of the car etc but somewhat blurs the background. It started in the days of slower shutters and slower film speeds but kept being used for the artistic representation of speed. One quirk was that for cameras with focal plane shutters (such as Leica M's and Nikon F's ) there was distortion so that things like wheels/tires looked elliptical.
 
#8
You need to rotate your pics so the horizon is straight. It’s especially obvious when the sea is the background.

Good pics but they’re all on the piss.
keeping straight when youve got 2 terriers charging about at full pelt is easier said than done Ive a shit load that didnt work out due to being too slow to catch them in motion.
 
#10
I do a bit of dog photography.

Here's my tips.

1. For static portraits get a whistle or take the squeaky out of a dog toy and keep it in your mouth. Get close, fill the frame, then **blow**. The dog will give you a 'look'; that's what you photograph. Take multiple shots.

1a. Treats will also hold a dogs attention. Make them look at the camera by holding a treat.

2. Use a helper and get them to throw a ball straight at you. Make sure it's into the sun, so the dog's face isn't in shadow. Take multiple shots. Do it multiple times. If it's a dog that doesn't know you it may not get close at first, but with multiple throws, it will gain confidence and get closer.

3. Fast shutter speed is a must for quick moving dogs. I use AI servo and put my shutter on continuous. I'll use about f/4 upwards. I'm not a bokeh whore and the extra depth of field means more chance of sharp photos.

4. Lie down and shoot, or at least kneel. Get down to the dog's level.

5. Take loads of photos; you're after 'lucky shots'. The more you take the more chance you have of getting one.

Scooby Don't
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr

IMG_1590
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr

IMG_7190
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr

IMG_2934-Edit-Edit-Edit-Edit-Edit
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr


IMG_5863
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr

IMG_7021
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr

IMG_1093
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr

IMG_0861
by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr
 
#11

So I've got to take a picture of a moving object for my camera course at college, What you think?

Bit blurred






Nice shadows of the dogs










Would have chosen this one hands down if Oisin had been more in the lense




The two stars of the photo's




Made me smile: thanks much!
 
#12
Would have chosen this one hands down if Oisin had been more in the lense


This one is my favourite; it doesn't fill the frame though. The blurry ones, delete. If you have a photo that isn't 'tack sharp', it's no good. Kill your babies (metaphorically speaking).

What's your course?

What camera are you using?

Are you using photo-editing software?

Do you shoot in RAW?
 
#13
I do a bit of dog photography.

Here's my tips.

1. For static portraits get a whistle or take the squeaky out of a dog toy and keep it in your mouth. Get close, fill the frame, then **blow**. The dog will give you a 'look'; that's what you photograph. Take multiple shots.

1a. Treats will also hold a dogs attention. Make them look at the camera by holding a treat.

2. Use a helper and get them to throw a ball straight at you. Make sure it's into the sun, so the dog's face isn't in shadow. Take multiple shots. Do it multiple times. If it's a dog that doesn't know you it may not get close at first, but with multiple throws, it will gain confidence and get closer.

3. Fast shutter speed is a must for quick moving dogs. I use AI servo and put my shutter on continuous. I'll use about f/4 upwards. I'm not a bokeh whore and the extra depth of field means more chance of sharp photos.

4. Lie down and shoot, or at least kneel. Get down to the dog's level.

5. Take loads of photos; you're after 'lucky shots'. The more you take the more chance you have of getting one.

IMG_2934-Edit-Edit-Edit-Edit-Edit by Whey-Aye-Banzai, on Flickr
Great tips and great photos. Have an informative and a like.
 
#16
This one is my favourite; it doesn't fill the frame though. The blurry ones, delete. If you have a photo that isn't 'tack sharp', it's no good. Kill your babies (metaphorically speaking).

What's your course?

What camera are you using?

Are you using photo-editing software?

Do you shoot in RAW?
Just a night school course at local college Camera Techniques (Beginners Digital Photography)that finished 2 weeks ago now. I took the pics using a Ni kon D3400 Yes shot in Raw but did make some minor tweks to this pic in photoshop we covered it breifly but its a seperate course.
 
#18
Sandwiches? It could be worse! Much worse.

KSDD7312.JPG


Back when my old Lizzie was alive she would et paper. One night I sat down in an organized fashion and paid all my bills (gas, water, phone, Visa, Amex, etc) . So I would not forget them in the morning I left the envelopes with checks on the chair by the door. Came down in the morning to find them shredded as efficiently as a document shredder. I had to do it all over again, this time without preprinted envelopes.

Another time I had left US$100 on the kitchen counter for the cleaning lady. Lizzie ate much of the money, not one note intact. I ended up doing a bit of a jigsaw puzzle with the pieces and taping them to paper and sent them off to the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston. I few weeks later I got a check from the US Treasury for $45. Made the jigsaw work worth it I guess. After that the cleaning lady's money was put on the windowsill behind the kitchen sink where Lizzie could not reach it.
 

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