PIAT

Nah.

Not for conformity with the times when that uniform was issued to CCFs.

Rationing only ended 2yrs before I was born, and Ronald McDonald didn't make obesity mandatory in UK until I was over 40 by which time Di Spencer was feeding Wills and Harry at the golden arches, so bony fvckers like @stoatman were commonplace (astonishingly, regarded as sexy, even) until long after DPM landed in the Cadet Force universe.
I forgot to set the baseline.

I was 65 on Paddy's day - my most troubling birthday present being my induction into the high-risk age category for COVID-19..

Feel free to start the sweepstake, but be warned: I think my DNA is part cockroach.
 
Last edited:

Bacongrills

On ROPS
On ROPs
I dunno..

I do a fair bit of gunsmithing here and there, and Mark is pretty good at the sort of things he does. I don't think I would let him near a pair of Hollands but for the restoration and maintenance of the guns he is dealing with, I don't think he is that bad. I think he is the best of the YouTube gunsmiths.. and is the only one that seems to be realistic about what he does.. If you think Mark is a bodger, you should look at Larry and Jack..


I am in 100% agreement with his philosophy that old guns need to be maintained, and that "Patina" in many cases = "Corrosion". Old guns need to be stripped down to the metal every so often to make sure there is no corrosion happening. Now that we have stopped regularly cleaning old guns with boiling water, the mechanism that kept blue, blue has in many cases ceased, and old guns are turning brown. If you look at the state of many of the guns that end up with Mark, he is not often starting in a good place. A combination of age, mishandling and neglect added to a total lack of spares makes it hard to do renovation on some of these cases. As you may have noticed, I do quite a lot of similar work, and you never know what you will find! You just have to apply basic principles and do what you need to do. Like sausages, the consumer is probably better not looking at the manufacturing process! I do cringe sometimes at his use of a hand drill, but to be honest, if you need a hole "there!" often using a hand drill is the only practical way to do it.. electric if you have the nerve!

I will agree that his workshop appears somewhat primitive, however from my own experience, this is something of the nature of the beast. He is not manufacturing or working on a limited class of arms and therefore has to deal with whatever comes in the door. Gunsmithing is an odd trade that sits somewhere between woodwork and metalwork; chemistry and physics; art, science and engineering; black magic and religion! I think that to be a good gunsmith, you need:

1. A BFO Vice with lead jaws and a horse.
2. Polished hammers and punches
3. Lots of files
4. Really, Really sharp chisels.
5. Proper turnscrews.

.... and not a lot else (except knowing how to use the above)! @Ravers - you may wish to comment?

Traditionally the UK gunsmithing trade was made up from a bunch of individuals who would pass work from one to another to get specific things done. This is becoming much more difficult as the pool of expertise shrinks.

Mark gets the reputation for being a bit of an Agraglas queen.. well I don't have a problem with this, as it is by far the best medium for repairing stock damage and if you listen to what he is actually saying, he does understand the forces he is dealing with and how to make repairs that address the underlying problems. His treatment of the Ferguson with the blown stock in the last posting is absolutely on the money, and having built one of these I think I am qualified to comment.. (though I don't agree with his loading sequence...)

He is however a: A good ole southern boy, and b: an ex nuclear bubbler, so we need to factor this into the equation!
He's a bluffer, half the stuff he comes out with sounds good but is made up bolloux and he's spinning out basic jobs to appear like they are major works, I don't care if he Bubba's peoples guns up in another continent but he's making himself out to be a master craftsman when he's not and it gets on my tits when I see people falling for his spiel.
 

HE117

LE
He's a bluffer, half the stuff he comes out with sounds good but is made up bolloux and he's spinning out basic jobs to appear like they are major works, I don't care if he Bubba's peoples guns up in another continent but he's making himself out to be a master craftsman when he's not and it gets on my tits when I see people falling for his spiel.
We shall just have to agree to disagree then...!
 

HE117

LE
Nah.

Not for conformity with the times when that uniform was issued to CCFs.

Rationing only ended 2yrs before I was born, and Ronald McDonald didn't make obesity mandatory in UK until I was over 40 by which time Di Spencer was feeding Wills and Harry at the golden arches, so bony fvckers like @stoatman were commonplace (astonishingly, regarded as sexy, even) until long after DPM landed in the Cadet Force universe.
Watching late 60s and early 70s Top of the Pops shows how skinny most of us were in those days...!
 
Watching late 60s and early 70s Top of the Pops shows how skinny most of us were in those days...!
See my thread "70s Birds, Not 'Arf" :-D

In the early pages is a link to a long, lingering (if only we'd known it then) film eulogy to a hot summer's afternoon on a West End street when cameramen were not PC, and most young ladies were slender :-D
 
That's repro, bought from Epic Militaria.

I did Finnish Brutality 2019 in original 49-patt BD though. Here's the gear discussion video, you can find the playlist wth all the other vids easily (I think it's linked in the description or at the end)

Interesting vid. One observation is that against that background, the BD seemed to blend in better.

In the vid you say your ‘37 pattern webbing belt is being worn high by design. Was that due to the holster being worn as well, or because it’s how the webbing was originally meant to be worn? I know it may be a bone question, but i’ve seen photos of the period where the belt is fairly high, and others with the belt located at the same level as the BD blouse waist.
 
Interesting vid. One observation is that against that background, the BD seemed to blend in better.

In the vid you say your ‘37 pattern webbing belt is being worn high by design. Was that due to the holster being worn as well, or because it’s how the webbing was originally meant to be worn? I know it may be a bone question, but i’ve seen photos of the period where the belt is fairly high, and others with the belt located at the same level as the BD blouse waist.
BD actually blends in rather well, a good combination of colour and dullness from the type of fabric used.

37 webbing is meant to be worn high, even at blouse waist level cos that's fairly high. It's meant to be worn so that you can sit in a vehicle with the basic pouches on your thighs, although you certainly see in late war photos people wearing it lower and wider in the field.

Here's a photo from the 1939 fitting instructions, so by the book:

1585639222177.png
 
Last edited:

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Nah.

Not for conformity with the times when that uniform was issued to CCFs.

Rationing only ended 2yrs before I was born, and Ronald McDonald didn't make obesity mandatory in UK until I was over 40 by which time Di Spencer was feeding Wills and Harry at the golden arches, so bony fvckers like @stoatman were commonplace (astonishingly, regarded as sexy, even) until long after DPM landed in the Cadet Force universe.
I remember distinctly rotund CCF and RAFVRT officers from the early eighties, before that I will defer to your greater knowledge....
 
BD actually blends in rather well, a good combination of colour and dullness from the type of fabric used.

37 webbing is meant to be worn high, even at blouse waist level cos that's fairly high. It's meant to be worn so that you can sit in a vehicle with the basic pouches on your thighs, although you certainly see in late war photos people wearing it lower and wider in the field.

Here's a photo from the 1939 fitting instructions, so by the book:

View attachment 461301
Thanks. It was a photo similar to that I saw but did wonder whether the belt placement was just personal preference. But your explanation makes sense.
 
37 BD is meant to be worn high, even at blouse waist level cos that's fairly high. It's meant to be worn so that you can sit in a vehicle with the basic pouches on your thighs, although you certainly see in late war photos people wearing it lower and wider in the field.
I'd argue that the ammo pouches are better-placed than those of 58 pattern, because both are readily accessible, with either hand, when you're on your belt buckle, hence the later popularity of chest webbing, and the modern placement of stowage on body armour.

Oddly, it seems to me, chest-mounted pouch designs were an early casualty in the 1970s development of PLCE, on the grounds that they looked "too Soviet".
 
I'd argue that the ammo pouches are better-placed than those of 58 pattern, because both are readily accessible, with either hand, when you're on your belt buckle, hence the later popularity of chest webbing, and the modern placement of stowage on body armour.

Oddly, it seems to me, chest-mounted pouch designs were an early casualty in the 1970s development of PLCE, on the grounds that they looked "too Soviet".
Of course chest rigs got binned. Nowhere to put that ever so crucial kit, boot polish and razor.
 
I'd argue that the ammo pouches are better-placed than those of 58 pattern, because both are readily accessible, with either hand, when you're on your belt buckle, hence the later popularity of chest webbing, and the modern placement of stowage on body armour.

Oddly, it seems to me, chest-mounted pouch designs were an early casualty in the 1970s development of PLCE, on the grounds that they looked "too Soviet".
It was certainly something interesting to come out of the Finnish Brutality experience - 37 patt skeleton order is basically a chestrig in all but name (I didn't wear the water bottle though). I would have had trouble getting through the car window in 58patt CEFO, whereas with the 37 patt basic pouches the gear didn't get in the way at all.
 

QRK2

LE
Watching late 60s and early 70s Top of the Pops shows how skinny most of us were in those days...!
A lot earlier I know but watching the medical scene in this (about 9:48 ) shows quite starkly the difference between what was considered normal only a short time ago and this millennium:

 
A lot earlier I know but watching the medical scene in this (about 9:48) shows quite starkly the difference between what was considered normal only a short time ago and this millennium:

Someone doing the deskbound job I do back in that era likely would do no more exercise than going for a brisk stroll occasionally, or perhaps playing a spot of cricket or football, so would either be portly or extremely skinny with little upper-body tone (like when I was at my minimum weight a while back).
 
Someone doing the deskbound job I do back in that era likely would do no more exercise than going for a brisk stroll occasionally, or perhaps playing a spot of cricket or football, so would either be portly or extremely skinny with little upper-body tone (like when I was at my minimum weight a while back).
Even for desk bound jobs, I would add other factors such as probably having to walk or take public transport to work, less take away food and ready meals and more having to cook from scratch, portion sizes tended to be smaller, food was relatively more expensive, less labour saving devices so for instance mowing your lawn with a manual rotary mower would have straight away burnt more calories than letting your robot lawn mower loose, even having to wear a collar and tie takes more effort than just slipping a T shirt on. Different times.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I have watched a Canadian army film about the commonwealth bde in Korea, the troops when arriving wear every bit of kit issued, within weeks advance to contact seemed to mean a bandolier tied around the waist, a shovel GS in one hand and No 4 in the other!
 
I have watched a Canadian army film about the commonwealth bde in Korea, the troops when arriving wear every bit of kit issued, within weeks advance to contact seemed to mean a bandolier tied around the waist, a shovel GS in one hand and No 4 in the other!
Normandy 1944, the same. Only photos you see of troops carrying more than that are taken at the start line for large-scale formal assaults.
 

Latest Threads

Top