PIAT

It wasn't the skinny German (Austrian?) dude whose YouTube series name I have also forgotten, was it?

ETA:
Come to think of it, IIRC the presenter quoted total production figures for Tigers, leaving me very surprised at how few were ever built, but those details haven't stuck in my memory either.
Spielberger indicates a total of 1,350 were built. The table below from his Tiger book shows the monthly production figures. Henschel in Kassel was the only factory producing the Tiger.

de_tiger1-production_0001.jpg


SOURCE:

Spielberger, Walter J. Der Panzerkampfwagen Tiger und seine Abarten. Motorbuch Verlag, Stuttgart, 1977. ISBN 3-87943-456-5 (Band 7 der Reihe "Militärfahrzeuge")
**Page 78**
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
It’s not a section 5 weapon though is it? It’s only the explosive projectiles that are prohibited!
 
Spielberger indicates a total of 1,350 were built. The table below from his Tiger book shows the monthly production figures. Henschel in Kassel was the only factory producing the Tiger.

View attachment 459791

SOURCE:

Spielberger, Walter J. Der Panzerkampfwagen Tiger und seine Abarten. Motorbuch Verlag, Stuttgart, 1977. ISBN 3-87943-456-5 (Band 7 der Reihe "Militärfahrzeuge")
**Page 78**



It’s not a section 5 weapon though is it? It’s only the explosive projectiles that are prohibited!
Its a weapon that launches aerodynamically stabilized projectiles.
Page 18 HO Firearms guidance notes:
any rocket launcher, or any mortar, for projecting a stabilised missile, other than a launcher or mortar designed for line-throwing or pyrotechnic purposes or as signaling apparatus (section 5(1)(ae));
The fins/drum tail on the bomb are the stabilisation required to fall under that category. Now I know the Prac round doesn't fit that definition, but the bomb does (as well as a entries IX, XI and XII, which refer to the bomb). Now just because you are not opting to fire a stabilised missile, doesn't mean it can not fire said missile. Thus you need to treat it as if you were firing the live round.
Now the logic of the situation, IE: No such thing as a live round in existence, matters not, this is the law!

The only way I could see you getting around this, is to manufacture the PIAT anew, with the prac round tray permanently part of the gun. Thus you could argue that it is impossible to fire live rounds, and you might even get it on the shotgun cert then!
I did wonder if a larger calibre spigot might work, so you can't fire live rounds, only modern prac rounds. But that could be easily convertible back to a normal spigot.
 
Maybe of interest. A bloke in the US has gotten his PIAT working again:

He uses newly machined versions of the prac round and blank 12 bore cartridges.

Now, all I need is a range, a PIAT, a FAC and a few other bits!
High-Tech weaponry, 1930s stylie: note the waterbottle cork hanging on a length of chain. . . . . a builder's skip trophy indeed.

That said, and however much oomph that generated back through the firer, it was substantially less dramatic than the myths and legends generally suggest. Same could be said, I guess about the 120mm BAT series, or the 84mm, whose legendary impact on the firer was (for my money) only horrendously shocking the first couple of times of being exposed to it, and then you learned how to deal with it.

I still wouldn't want to be the lucky bloke elected as the platoon's duty tank-killer PIAT hero, mind you.
 
A muzzle cap function of some kind ?
Pretty much. When combat is expected you cock the PIAT. You can carry and store her fully cocked for long periods with no problem. Cocking the PIAT withdraws the Spigot into the body, leaving a great big hole into the internal workings. So you hammer the cork in. When you're getting ready to fire, yank out the cork, flip up your front and back sights, drop a bomb into the tray, and give it a tap to seat it right, and you're ready to fire.

Dirt in the internals might adhere to the spigot, and that's one of the three top causes of misfires. So they took a brutally simple but effective solution to the problem, a cork on a bit of chain.
 
Just as effective in the hands of an Army chef......

 
Spielberger indicates a total of 1,350 were built. The table below from his Tiger book shows the monthly production figures. Henschel in Kassel was the only factory producing the Tiger.

View attachment 459791

SOURCE:

Spielberger, Walter J. Der Panzerkampfwagen Tiger und seine Abarten. Motorbuch Verlag, Stuttgart, 1977. ISBN 3-87943-456-5 (Band 7 der Reihe "Militärfahrzeuge")
**Page 78**
Tiny discrepancy with Jentz there - he quotes 67 in Dec 43.
 
Maybe of interest. A bloke in the US has gotten his PIAT working again:

He uses newly machined versions of the prac round and blank 12 bore cartridges.

Now, all I need is a range, a PIAT, a FAC and a few other bits!
As a minor correction, it's a bloke in Canada, not the US, in that video.
 
A muzzle cap function of some kind ?
From the description by @Listy , I think the closest technical term would be 'tampion' * rather than muzzle cap.

I wonder what term is used in The PIAT Manual, as opposed to the one used by CPL Bloggs: "i'ssa fackin' cawk, ain't it!"
- - -
* With all the f'nar potential associated with that word :)
 

HE117

LE
From the description by @Listy , I think the closest technical term would be 'tampion' * rather than muzzle cap.

I wonder what term is used in The PIAT Manual, as opposed to the one used by CPL Bloggs: "i'ssa fackin' cawk, ain't it!"
- - -
* With all the f'nar potential associated with that word :)
"Tompion" if you don't mind!
 

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