PIAT

I've seen the same video on Youtube can't remember the title
It wasn't the skinny German (Austrian?) dude whose YouTube series name I have also forgotten, was it?

ETA:
Come to think of it, IIRC the presenter quoted total production figures for Tigers, leaving me very surprised at how few were ever built, but those details haven't stuck in my memory either.
 
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As Listy says, it could out shoot a rocket launcher with regards to rate of fire, but it had another trick up its sleeve. Buildings make for handy protection/concealment. No problem for the PIAT, but I wouldn't fancy firing a bazooka et al from inside a room.
Did post on here I think about one good thing about the M1A1 bazooka was the ammo came in individual cardboard tubes.

Some bright spark had the idea of sticking a few in the soil pointing towards the Hun, connecting them with DON 10 to a battery.

Not accurate but would put the Huns on the back foot.

Someone also posed hay there was a field manual with them being buried vertically so if a vehicle ran over them they would detonate.
 

Chef

LE
It wasn't the skinny German (Austrian?) dude whose YouTube series name I have also forgotten, was it?

ETA:
Come to think of it, IIRC the presenter quoted total production figures for Tigers, leaving me very surprised at how few were ever built, but those details haven't stuck in my memory either.
I honestly can't remember. OT As far as production numbers go we had more JagdTigers and the like at my school wargames society than were actually built.
 
The panzerfaust certainly had it for a throwaway job that could defeat armour.
I'm surprised we didn't nick the idea. Were there any recorded events where we used captured versions against the oppo?
 
(pretty sure it was a history documentary presented by a proper historian, and not in a book)
OOoooooo Meow!
Tell ya what, anything in my book you disagree with challenge me to provide a source for it.
:D

Did post on here I think about one good thing about the M1A1 bazooka was the ammo came in individual cardboard tubes.

Some bright spark had the idea of sticking a few in the soil pointing towards the Hun, connecting them with DON 10 to a battery.

Not accurate but would put the Huns on the back foot.

Someone also posed hay there was a field manual with them being buried vertically so if a vehicle ran over them they would detonate.
Allow me to introduce you to the LILO rocket

(My next book is likely covering British rocketry)
 
The panzerfaust certainly had it for a throwaway job that could defeat armour.
I'm surprised we didn't nick the idea. Were there any recorded events where we used captured versions against the oppo?
No because as shown it was a bit shite, and we had a perfectly good PIAT.
 
OOoooooo Meow!
Tell ya what, anything in my book you disagree with challenge me to provide a source for it.
:D
You misconstrue me: there are proper historians (the late, great Prof Richard Holmes, for example) on TV, and then there's the likes of Dan Snow.

The words "not from a book" is just me reminding myself that I haven't read anything recently about Normandy.

So - apologies for any unintentional offence caused.
 
You misconstrue me: there are proper historians (the late, great Prof Richard Holmes, for example) on TV, and then there's the likes of Dan Snow.

The words "not from a book" is just me reminding myself that I haven't read anything recently about Normandy.

So - apologies for any unintentional offence caused.
Pffft you didn't cause any offence, you'd have to work much harder to achieve that aim. It was just amusing to me.
 
OOoooooo Meow!
Tell ya what, anything in my book you disagree with challenge me to provide a source for it.
:D



Allow me to introduce you to the LILO rocket

(My next book is likely covering British rocketry)
That looks like the home-made stuff used in Syria. What was the intended role please?
 
That looks like the home-made stuff used in Syria. What was the intended role please?
If memory serves, it was a rocket you set up and aimed at a German psoition while getting ready for an assault. When ready, you stand well back light the blue touch paper and the infantry go charging through hole you've just blasted.
 
No because as shown it was a bit shite, and we had a perfectly good PIAT.
My memory suggests that I did once read (or read of) an official allied report on the potential of employing captured Panzerfausts. IIRC it took the view that doing so would entail way too much risk, for too little benefit.

But it's easy to see why the Hun had a different perspective on those issues.
 
It wasn't the skinny German (Austrian?) dude whose YouTube series name I have also forgotten, was it?

ETA:
Come to think of it, IIRC the presenter quoted total production figures for Tigers, leaving me very surprised at how few were ever built, but those details haven't stuck in my memory either.
History visualised?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
The panzerfaust certainly had it for a throwaway job that could defeat armour.
I'm surprised we didn't nick the idea. Were there any recorded events where we used captured versions against the oppo?
The Soviets systematically collected Panzerfausts, which the Germans abandoned in large numbers as they retreated. The Soviets apparently didn't use them much as anti-tank weapons, but their infantry lobbed them at bunkers, houses, trench positions, and the like as a sort of pocket artillery.

I recall read this in "Tank Archives", which presented it as translated instructions to Soviet infantry to collect up any Panzerfausts they found left by the Germans.
 
It wasn't the skinny German (Austrian?) dude whose YouTube series name I have also forgotten, was it?

ETA:
Come to think of it, IIRC the presenter quoted total production figures for Tigers, leaving me very surprised at how few were ever built, but those details haven't stuck in my memory either.
The Tiger was a heavy tank intended for specialised roles such as breaking through enemy positions and defending against enemy attacks. The late war general purpose medium tank was intended to be the Panther.

The Soviet equivalent to the Tiger was the KV, and later the IS. The closest British equivalent was the Churchill. The American heavy tanks didn't make it out of the testing grounds until the very end of the war.
 
The Russians were losing so many men in urban warfare that it was easier to simply blast a German out of it with a Panzerfaust rather than sending in a squad to clear a building out. They couldn't have cared less about setting a building on fire or blowing it apart,if it impeded the advance. It has been said that they even fired the panzerfaust at individual infantrymen, if it ment clearing the way.
 

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